Walz is a Fraud on Covid LockDown

Go4Broke

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 5, 2010
Messages
5,030
Reaction score
1,588
Points
113
Thanks, Gov Walz. Your executive actions over the course of the last 13 months have saved many lives in Minnesota.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

State Covid-19 Death Rates per 100,000 Residents

Iowa, South Dakota, and North Dakota all ranked among the 17 Highest Covid Death Rates

Minnesota ranked 15th Lowest


Here is a breakdown of COVID-19 deaths per 100,000 people in all 50 U.S. states and Washington, D.C. The data was last updated April 23.

New Jersey: 285
Population: 8.9 million residents

New York: 264
Population: 19.4 million

Massachusetts: 254
Population: 6.9 million

Rhode Island: 251
Population: 1.1 million

Mississippi: 241
Population: 3 million

Arizona: 237
Population: 7.3 million

Connecticut: 225
Population: 3.6 million

Louisiana: 222
Population: 4.6 million

Alabama: 221
Population: 4.9 million

South Dakota: 221
Population: 884,659


Pennsylvania: 203
Population: 12.8 million

North Dakota: 199
Population: 762,062


Indiana: 197
Population: 6.7 million

New Mexico: 192
Population: 2.1 million

Illinois: 190
Population: 12.7 million

Arkansas: 189
Population: 3 million

Iowa: 187
Population: 3.2 million


Michigan: 183
Population: 10 million

South Carolina: 182
Population: 5.1 million

Georgia: 181
Population: 10.6 million

Tennessee: 176
Population: 6.8 million

Nevada: 175
Population: 3.1 million

Kansas: 172
Population: 2.9 million

Texas: 172
Population: 30 million

Oklahoma: 170
Population: 4 million

Delaware: 165
Population: 973,764

Ohio: 163
Population: 11.7 million

Florida: 162
Population: 21.5 million

West Virginia: 157
Population: 1.8 million

District of Columbia: 156
Population: 705,749

California: 155
Population: 39.5 million

Missouri: 149
Population: 6.1 million

Montana: 146
Population: 1.1 million

Kentucky: 145
Population: 4.5 million

Maryland: 143
Population: 6 million

Wisconsin: 128
Population: 5.8 million

Minnesota: 126
Population: 5.6 million


Virginia: 125
Population: 8.5 million

Nebraska: 122
Population: 1.9 million

Wyoming: 122
Population: 578,759

North Carolina: 120
Population: 10.5 million

Idaho: 114
Population: 1.8 million

Colorado: 110
Population: 5.8 million

New Hampshire: 94
Population: 1.4 million

Washington: 72
Population: 7.6 million

Utah: 68
Population: 3.2 million

Oregon: 59
Population: 4.2 million

Maine: 57
Population: 1.3 million

Alaska: 43
Population: 731,545

Vermont: 39
Population: 623,989

Hawaii: 33
Population: 1.4 million
 
Last edited:

Spoofin

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
19,584
Reaction score
4,306
Points
113
This is the kind of thing that leads to those tasked with finding a connection to publish pie graphs supporting the narrative, based on a selected 2.5% of cases where they used “contact tracing”. Good thing no one on here fell for that...... well, at least no one on here defended it when others called it out as clear BS..... promote it as “science”?.... wait! what? Sheep be sheep.
 

Blizzard

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
3,996
Reaction score
311
Points
83
I'm not sure if this has been posted but if it hasn't:


Minnesota's controversial pause on youth sports last fall received new attention Monday as lawmakers and sports advocates accused Gov. Tim Walz and state health leaders of overselling the danger of athletes spreading COVID-19 to vulnerable people such as long-term care residents.

The Let Them Play MN group that opposed many sports-related pandemic restrictions obtained thousands of pages of internal state e-mails from last fall and raised concern about one in which a spokesperson advised promoting the pause by connecting youth sports infections to severe COVID-19 cases in long-term care.

"As [people] push back on youth sports and whether they really need to be ended ... we need to more explicitly tie youth sports to LTC. People are going to youth sports, sitting in bleachers, eating popcorn and talking with people around them, cheering, then maybe stopping at a restaurant or bar on the way home, then going to jobs in LTC the following day," said the e-mail by Kate Brickman, a contractor hired to help with state COVID-19 communications to other spokespeople.


Michelle Benson, R-Ham Lake, said she was "embarrassed" that the Minnesota Department of Health considered such a backward strategy.

"Here's the way it should work: There is data, then there is a decision, then there is communication," she said. "It's not, 'We need a message. Go find me the data that matches it.' 

Health officials knew the sports pause last fall would be unpopular, based on e-mails at the time. Laura Oliven of the state's COVID-19 response team wrote on Nov. 5 that "the election, particularly the loss of six DFL seats in the House, was in part a referendum on our guidance, and sports was part of that."
 

Spoofin

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
19,584
Reaction score
4,306
Points
113
I'm not sure if this has been posted but if it hasn't:


Minnesota's controversial pause on youth sports last fall received new attention Monday as lawmakers and sports advocates accused Gov. Tim Walz and state health leaders of overselling the danger of athletes spreading COVID-19 to vulnerable people such as long-term care residents.

The Let Them Play MN group that opposed many sports-related pandemic restrictions obtained thousands of pages of internal state e-mails from last fall and raised concern about one in which a spokesperson advised promoting the pause by connecting youth sports infections to severe COVID-19 cases in long-term care.

"As [people] push back on youth sports and whether they really need to be ended ... we need to more explicitly tie youth sports to LTC. People are going to youth sports, sitting in bleachers, eating popcorn and talking with people around them, cheering, then maybe stopping at a restaurant or bar on the way home, then going to jobs in LTC the following day," said the e-mail by Kate Brickman, a contractor hired to help with state COVID-19 communications to other spokespeople.


Michelle Benson, R-Ham Lake, said she was "embarrassed" that the Minnesota Department of Health considered such a backward strategy.

"Here's the way it should work: There is data, then there is a decision, then there is communication," she said. "It's not, 'We need a message. Go find me the data that matches it.' 

Health officials knew the sports pause last fall would be unpopular, based on e-mails at the time. Laura Oliven of the state's COVID-19 response team wrote on Nov. 5 that "the election, particularly the loss of six DFL seats in the House, was in part a referendum on our guidance, and sports was part of that."
Data and Science.
 

Ogee Oglethorpe

Over Macho Grande?
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
10,245
Reaction score
1,841
Points
113
Michelle Benson, R-Ham Lake, said she was "embarrassed" that the Minnesota Department of Health considered such a backward strategy.

"Here's the way it should work: There is data, then there is a decision, then there is communication," she said. "It's not, 'We need a message. Go find me the data that matches it.' 
This is pretty much what happened all across the country in blue states, probably none more so than right in MN. Then again, it continues to happen here on the board also. Nobody here is better at digging up AFFIRMATION rather than INFORMATION than Broke and JTF
 

stocker08

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2009
Messages
23,948
Reaction score
5,317
Points
113
Thanks, Gov Walz. Your executive actions over the course of the last 13 months have saved many lives in Minnesota.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

State Covid-19 Death Rates per 100,000 Residents

Iowa, South Dakota, and North Dakota all ranked among the 17 Highest Covid Death Rates

Minnesota ranked 15th Lowest


Here is a breakdown of COVID-19 deaths per 100,000 people in all 50 U.S. states and Washington, D.C. The data was last updated April 23.

New Jersey: 285
Population: 8.9 million residents

New York: 264
Population: 19.4 million

Massachusetts: 254
Population: 6.9 million

Rhode Island: 251
Population: 1.1 million

Mississippi: 241
Population: 3 million

Arizona: 237
Population: 7.3 million

Connecticut: 225
Population: 3.6 million

Louisiana: 222
Population: 4.6 million

Alabama: 221
Population: 4.9 million

South Dakota: 221
Population: 884,659


Pennsylvania: 203
Population: 12.8 million

North Dakota: 199
Population: 762,062


Indiana: 197
Population: 6.7 million

New Mexico: 192
Population: 2.1 million

Illinois: 190
Population: 12.7 million

Arkansas: 189
Population: 3 million

Iowa: 187
Population: 3.2 million


Michigan: 183
Population: 10 million

South Carolina: 182
Population: 5.1 million

Georgia: 181
Population: 10.6 million

Tennessee: 176
Population: 6.8 million

Nevada: 175
Population: 3.1 million

Kansas: 172
Population: 2.9 million

Texas: 172
Population: 30 million

Oklahoma: 170
Population: 4 million

Delaware: 165
Population: 973,764

Ohio: 163
Population: 11.7 million

Florida: 162
Population: 21.5 million

West Virginia: 157
Population: 1.8 million

District of Columbia: 156
Population: 705,749

California: 155
Population: 39.5 million

Missouri: 149
Population: 6.1 million

Montana: 146
Population: 1.1 million

Kentucky: 145
Population: 4.5 million

Maryland: 143
Population: 6 million

Wisconsin: 128
Population: 5.8 million

Minnesota: 126
Population: 5.6 million


Virginia: 125
Population: 8.5 million

Nebraska: 122
Population: 1.9 million

Wyoming: 122
Population: 578,759

North Carolina: 120
Population: 10.5 million

Idaho: 114
Population: 1.8 million

Colorado: 110
Population: 5.8 million

New Hampshire: 94
Population: 1.4 million

Washington: 72
Population: 7.6 million

Utah: 68
Population: 3.2 million

Oregon: 59
Population: 4.2 million

Maine: 57
Population: 1.3 million

Alaska: 43
Population: 731,545

Vermont: 39
Population: 623,989

Hawaii: 33
Population: 1.4 million

Yup. The anti-masker states around here are doing far worse than Minnesota. Thank god Walz isn't a moron like Noem.
 

STPGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
5,789
Reaction score
522
Points
113
Why not just let the counties or individual cities make the rules then? Wisconsin is now maskless I believe, but they are still required in Dane and Milwaukee counties and I assume larger cities.
I have no good answers. With that said, it is difficult enough to control state to state travel let alone county to county, or town to town/ city to city.

Another way to look at this is going forward more federal guidance will most likely be needed.

One way to look at this is through a flawed analogy. Bomb experts are the best at defusing a bomb, but even they come across bombs they have never seen. They also make mistakes when attempting to defuse one they have never seen. The hope is that they live to learn from it. Most times if lives are involved, they still try.
 

STPGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
5,789
Reaction score
522
Points
113
This is the kind of thing that leads to those tasked with finding a connection to publish pie graphs supporting the narrative, based on a selected 2.5% of cases where they used “contact tracing”. Good thing no one on here fell for that...... well, at least no one on here defended it when others called it out as clear BS..... promote it as “science”?.... wait! what? Sheep be sheep.
If you cannot sample the entire population, you have to use sampling statistics. If one is to infer the data is incorrect, wouldn't one have to spell out how the calculations and the perceived sampling errors are incorrect?
 

Spoofin

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
19,584
Reaction score
4,306
Points
113
If you cannot sample the entire population, you have to use sampling statistics. If one is to infer the data is incorrect, wouldn't one have to spell out how the calculations and the perceived sampling errors are incorrect?
Go back and read the thread. The pie graph was BS from the start for many reasons and I wasn't the only one pointing those reasons out. Yet now, even after this e-mail is published, you are still here trying to defend the merits of said pie graph. Yeah, that makes sense.
 

GopherWeatherGuy

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2013
Messages
9,008
Reaction score
2,652
Points
113
Go back and read the thread. The pie graph was BS from the start for many reasons and I wasn't the only one pointing those reasons out. Yet now, even after this e-mail is published, you are still here trying to defend the merits of said pie graph. Yeah, that makes sense.

It's insane. It has been proven time and again that Walz and his crew are dictating however they want to dictate, then dig up data as confirmation bias later while preaching 'data and Science'.

Anyone that can do simple data analysis understands this, the ones who don't are purposely burying their head in the sand.
 

howeda7

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2008
Messages
53,794
Reaction score
11,086
Points
113
Yup. The anti-masker states around here are doing far worse than Minnesota. Thank god Walz isn't a moron like Noem.
If MN had the same death rate as SD, there would be another 5,300 dead Minnesotans. But how does one measure that against lost "freedom"?
 

STPGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
5,789
Reaction score
522
Points
113
Go back and read the thread. The pie graph was BS from the start for many reasons and I wasn't the only one pointing those reasons out. Yet now, even after this e-mail is published, you are still here trying to defend the merits of said pie graph. Yeah, that makes sense.
Yep. I did neither defend or reject. I just said, if we are challenging stats, let's break down how the stats are wrong. Since 'we' are into facts, you can crunch the numbers, or discuss a correct sampling technique and sample population.

Right now all I see is opinions.
 

Wally

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
7,482
Reaction score
3,616
Points
113
If MN had the same death rate as SD, there would be another 5,300 dead Minnesotans. But how does one measure that against lost "freedom"?

You could calculate how many years the dead lose versus how many the living lose to restrictions.
 

Pompous Elitist

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 18, 2013
Messages
16,850
Reaction score
1,989
Points
113
This is pretty much what happened all across the country in blue states, probably none more so than right in MN. Then again, it continues to happen here on the board also. Nobody here is better at digging up AFFIRMATION rather than INFORMATION than Broke and JTF

Data hasn’t mattered. Irrational fears and political CYA best summarizes the CA experience with schools, outdoor activities.

Still a personal favorite
 

Spoofin

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
19,584
Reaction score
4,306
Points
113
Right now all I see is opinions.
Only opinions????????
I'm not sure if this has been posted but if it hasn't:


Minnesota's controversial pause on youth sports last fall received new attention Monday as lawmakers and sports advocates accused Gov. Tim Walz and state health leaders of overselling the danger of athletes spreading COVID-19 to vulnerable people such as long-term care residents.

The Let Them Play MN group that opposed many sports-related pandemic restrictions obtained thousands of pages of internal state e-mails from last fall and raised concern about one in which a spokesperson advised promoting the pause by connecting youth sports infections to severe COVID-19 cases in long-term care.

"As [people] push back on youth sports and whether they really need to be ended ... we need to more explicitly tie youth sports to LTC. People are going to youth sports, sitting in bleachers, eating popcorn and talking with people around them, cheering, then maybe stopping at a restaurant or bar on the way home, then going to jobs in LTC the following day," said the e-mail by Kate Brickman, a contractor hired to help with state COVID-19 communications to other spokespeople.


Michelle Benson, R-Ham Lake, said she was "embarrassed" that the Minnesota Department of Health considered such a backward strategy.

"Here's the way it should work: There is data, then there is a decision, then there is communication," she said. "It's not, 'We need a message. Go find me the data that matches it.' 

Health officials knew the sports pause last fall would be unpopular, based on e-mails at the time. Laura Oliven of the state's COVID-19 response team wrote on Nov. 5 that "the election, particularly the loss of six DFL seats in the House, was in part a referendum on our guidance, and sports was part of that."
 

stocker08

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2009
Messages
23,948
Reaction score
5,317
Points
113
If MN had the same death rate as SD, there would be another 5,300 dead Minnesotans. But how does one measure that against lost "freedom"?

And the righties would be yelling even louder. Fact is that nothing Walz could or would have done would have been applauded by the righties. Hell...they still think Trump did a good job on corona response. The guy who was saying it was not a problem and would go away by itself.

Think about that when you read about how they think Walz has been terrible.
 

stocker08

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2009
Messages
23,948
Reaction score
5,317
Points
113
Yep. I did neither defend or reject. I just said, if we are challenging stats, let's break down how the stats are wrong. Since 'we' are into facts, you can crunch the numbers, or discuss a correct sampling technique and sample population.

Right now all I see is opinions.

That's all you are going to get from the Donalds. Opinions and conjecture. Throw out how Minnesota death rates are far better than the anti-masker states of Iowa and the Dakotas....and prepare for a pivot.
 

STPGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
5,789
Reaction score
522
Points
113
Only opinions????????
Though clearly damning as stated, it isn't a total slam dunk. There are many issues in society that go through this. Having been part of such conversations in the business world, I still know there may be more to it. Including someone else being in someone's ear and saying that there is concern regarding exposures to vulnerable populations.

Adding another layer to this argument, it further exposes the need to have more coordinated care efforts. This is a classic top down failure example.

I had reservations about handling the youth, but no solutions, so I haven't commented on youth sports issues much.
 

STPGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
5,789
Reaction score
522
Points
113
And the righties would be yelling even louder. Fact is that nothing Walz could or would have done would have been applauded by the righties. Hell...they still think Trump did a good job on corona response. The guy who was saying it was not a problem and would go away by itself.

Think about that when you read about how they think Walz has been terrible.
Yes, many failures. However, I will say that Trump has been somewhat consistent. Can we expect I guy that does not believe in government/ governance to want to govern properly?
 

howeda7

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2008
Messages
53,794
Reaction score
11,086
Points
113
And the righties would be yelling even louder. Fact is that nothing Walz could or would have done would have been applauded by the righties. Hell...they still think Trump did a good job on corona response. The guy who was saying it was not a problem and would go away by itself.

Think about that when you read about how they think Walz has been terrible.
He screwed up putting people back in nursing homes. So did some other governors. Perhaps he's too cautious at times. Those are his sins.

But the state party who's most recognizable face is MyPillowGuy thinks they would have done much, much better.
 

Spoofin

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
19,584
Reaction score
4,306
Points
113
He screwed up putting people back in nursing homes. So did some other governors. Perhaps he's too cautious at times. Those are his sins.

You are being too hard on him. I read somewhere that there was nothing he could have done 🤷‍♂️
 

Wally

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
7,482
Reaction score
3,616
Points
113
He screwed up putting people back in nursing homes. So did some other governors. Perhaps he's too cautious at times. Those are his sins.
They were going to die either way, who cares...
🤷🏼‍♂️
 

forever a gopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
1,778
Reaction score
893
Points
113
Though clearly damning as stated, it isn't a total slam dunk. There are many issues in society that go through this. Having been part of such conversations in the business world, I still know there may be more to it. Including someone else being in someone's ear and saying that there is concern regarding exposures to vulnerable populations.

Adding another layer to this argument, it further exposes the need to have more coordinated care efforts. This is a classic top down failure example.

I had reservations about handling the youth, but no solutions, so I haven't commented on youth sports issues much.
This has been the problem (mostly) all along. The "emergency powers" that Walz took and refuses to give up. At the very beginning, I will give him the benefit of the doubt, and say he needed to make quick decisions. However, as things wore on, and most certainly since early summer of 2020, things aren't moving so fast that these decisions can't be done by ALL of our elected officials. Do remote debate/voting. If I can work remotely, why can't they, on demand, when needed? I'm no fan of politicians, but at least if ALL our elected officials are making decisions, we have somebody to go to to tell them they doing a crap job. And ya know, it's the way that our constitution guarantees us things will happen (or so we all thought). Heavy is the head that wears steals the crown.

It's amazing to me how many people have just rolled over and continue to see no problem with one person dictating essentially every important aspect of a state of 5.3 million. Even if he's on your side of the aisle, really? You don't see a problem with this? How divided we have become that your team being is power is more important than upholding the constitutional rights of all Americans.
 

Spoofin

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
19,584
Reaction score
4,306
Points
113
This has been the problem (mostly) all along. The "emergency powers" that Walz took and refuses to give up. At the very beginning, I will give him the benefit of the doubt, and say he needed to make quick decisions. However, as things wore on, and most certainly since early summer of 2020, things aren't moving so fast that these decisions can't be done by ALL of our elected officials. Do remote debate/voting. If I can work remotely, why can't they, on demand, when needed? I'm no fan of politicians, but at least if ALL our elected officials are making decisions, we have somebody to go to to tell them they doing a crap job. And ya know, it's the way that our constitution guarantees us things will happen (or so we all thought). Heavy is the head that wears steals the crown.

It's amazing to me how many people have just rolled over and continue to see no problem with one person dictating essentially every important aspect of a state of 5.3 million. Even if he's on your side of the aisle, really? You don't see a problem with this? How divided we have become that your team being is power is more important than upholding the constitutional rights of all Americans.
Great Post.
 

jamiche

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2008
Messages
22,332
Reaction score
2,437
Points
113
While I'm uncomfortable with one person having this much authority in our system of governance, in this situation it was preferable to giving the donalds a say in a public health emergency of this severity. It frightens me to think of how much higher our case counts and death rates would have been if the donalds had been allowed to block necessary steps in the name of "freedom" and "common sense." ("Freedom" for donalds usually means freedom for them, but not other folks. We have no idea what "common sense" means, but it sounds good.) Anti science, anti medicine and anti vaccine was not the prescription our state needed.

Walz mishandled the nursing home situation. Other than that, very sound.
 

stocker08

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2009
Messages
23,948
Reaction score
5,317
Points
113
While I'm uncomfortable with one person having this much authority in our system of governance, in this situation it was preferable to giving the donalds a say in a public health emergency of this severity. It frightens me to think of how much higher our case counts and death rates would have been if the donalds had been allowed to block necessary steps in the name of "freedom" and "common sense." ("Freedom" for donalds usually means freedom for them, but not other folks. We have no idea what "common sense" means, but it sounds good.) Anti science, anti medicine and anti vaccine was not the prescription our state needed.

Walz mishandled the nursing home situation. Other than that, very sound.

Bingo. The donalds were going to whine and cry regardless.
 

Section2

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 30, 2009
Messages
47,959
Reaction score
3,226
Points
113
If MN had the same death rate as SD, there would be another 5,300 dead Minnesotans. But how does one measure that against lost "freedom"?
This is such an awful post. Freedom really is a joke to you. Ron Paul voter. We should trade freedom for security!! Lick Walz Lick
 
Top Bottom