Voter Suppression efforts in full swing

howeda7

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Georgia:

ATLANTA (AP) — Marsha Appling-Nunez was showing the college students she teaches how to check online if they’re registered to vote when she made a troubling discovery. Despite being an active Georgia voter who had cast ballots in recent elections, she was no longer registered.

“I was kind of shocked,” said Appling-Nunez, who moved from one Atlanta suburb to another in May and believed she had successfully changed her address on the voter rolls.

“I’ve always voted. I try to not miss any elections, including local ones,” Appling-Nunez said.

She tried re-registering, but with about one month left before a November election that will decide a governor’s race and some competitive U.S. House races, Appling-Nunez’s application is one of over 53,000 sitting on hold with Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp’s office. And unlike Appling-Nunez, many people on that list — which is predominantly black, according to an analysis by The Associated Press — may not even know their voter registration has been held up.

An analysis of the records obtained by The Associated Press reveals racial disparity in the process. Georgia’s population is approximately 32 percent black, according to the U.S. Census, but the list of voter registrations on hold with Kemp’s office is nearly 70 percent black.


http://time.com/5421332/georgia-brian-kemp-secretary-of-state-53000-voters-governor/

North Dakota:

Until recently, voting in North Dakota was relatively easy. The state has no voter registration; historically, residents could simply show up at the polls and provide some form of identification (no photo required). If they lacked ID, voters could sign an affidavit confirming their eligibility. The GOP-controlled Legislature began cracking down on suffrage shortly after Heitkamp eked out an unexpected victory in 2012, winning by fewer than 3,000 votes. Republicans introduced a stringent voter ID requirement, then scrapped the affidavit option. A federal district court blocked the new rules in 2016 as a likely equal-protection violation due to the massive burdens they placed on Native American voters. The Legislature tweaked the law in 2017, but the court again froze a large chunk of it in April, citing its “discriminatory and burdensome impact on Native Americans.”

Thanks to this decision, the most draconian components of North Dakota’s voter ID law were not in effect during the state’s June primary. In late September, however, the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the district court in a 2–1 decision. The appeals court allowed the state to implement the part of the law that compels voters to provide an ID that includes his or her current residential street address. This provision is controversial because it seems to directly target Native Americans. The U.S. Postal Service doesn’t provide residential delivery in rural reservations, so most tribal members use a P.O. box, which is listed as their address on tribal IDs. To remedy this problem, the district court had ordered the state to accept IDs that list a current mailing address. But the 8th Circuit scrapped that compromise, permitting the state to reject IDs that include a mailing address but no street address—that is, a huge number of tribal IDs.


https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2018/10/heidi-heitkamp-north-dakota-senate-voter-id.html

Texas:

https://www.khou.com/article/news/l...e-at-prairie-view-am-university/285-603008371

“We understand that Waller County’s had a history,” said Duhon. “But we’ve worked very hard to make sure students have their right to vote.”

Duhon told us additional poll workers will be on campus during early voting and on election day. And any incorrect addresses will be changed on the spot.

“I want all the students at Prairie View to know there is nothing that’s going to be done to deprive them of their ability to vote,” said Duhon. “If they’ve registered for this election.”

“I registered on Friday,” said student Jada Davis.

Davis took a registration worker’s advice to be on the safe side.

“She actually told me, just in case there was an issue with the address, she gave me a receipt,” said Davis. “So, I put it in my wallet.”

The Texas League of Women Voters is among the groups also looking into issues at PVAMU. An official there told us she is encouraged by the cooperation between the county and the university.
 

cncmin

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This reminds me of the famous ol' Republican Party saying:

"If you can't beat them fairly, cheat cheat cheat and cheat some more!"
 

Bad Gopher

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The North Dakota situation is particularly troubling. That's a tactic that's going to catch on around the entire West. That's a whole swath of people they're going to be able to disenfranchise on a clean technicality.
 

justthefacts

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<script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
 

LesBolstad

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Even more troubling: millions thinking it's a bad idea to require a valid ID to vote; despite an ID required to do virtually any financial or licensing task.

Country of dummies.
 

Section2

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I do not support voter suppression. And I also don't trust Howie, Time, or Slate to tell me that it's happening.
 

KillerGopherFan

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Question for howie. If Blacks make up 13% of the US populations, but 80% of the NFL, does that mean discrimination is causing the difference? Or could there be other reasons?

It appears that anytime there’s a difference in amount of representation in electoral rolls that some jump to the conclusion that discrimination is the issue.

As Les said, an ID is required for many many things, so why is it too big of a burden to assure voting integrity?

My oldest son is 28 years old, yet he gets carded every time we go to dinner and he orders a beer. And nobody complains.
 

justthefacts

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I do not support voter suppression. And I also don't trust Howie, Time, or Slate to tell me that it's happening.
Google Brian Kemp and find a charitable interpretation of what he's doing and post it here.
 

justthefacts

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Question for howie. If Blacks make up 13% of the US populations, but 80% of the NFL, does that mean discrimination is causing the difference? Or could there be other reasons?

It appears that anytime there’s a difference in amount of representation in electoral rolls that some jump to the conclusion that discrimination is the issue.

As Les said, an ID is required for many many things, so why is it too big of a burden to assure voting integrity?

My oldest son is 28 years old, yet he gets carded every time we go to dinner and he orders a beer. And nobody complains.
Yep, drinking is exactly like voting. No differences at all.

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
 

gopher_alum_2005

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Question for howie. If Blacks make up 13% of the US populations, but 80% of the NFL, does that mean discrimination is causing the difference? Or could there be other reasons?

It appears that anytime there’s a difference in amount of representation in electoral rolls that some jump to the conclusion that discrimination is the issue.

As Les said, an ID is required for many many things, so why is it too big of a burden to assure voting integrity?

My oldest son is 28 years old, yet he gets carded every time we go to dinner and he orders a beer. And nobody complains.

Is this a serious post? Les - time for one of your golden ****** awards. This post probably wins for all of 2018
 

KillerGopherFan

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Is this a serious post? Les - time for one of your golden ****** awards. This post probably wins for all of 2018
Was I not PC? What specifically is your problem and maybe we can discuss? No, it’s much more powerful to pretend there’s something about it.
 

tikited

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Voter suppression is a right wing tactic that has been happening in one way or another for many years. The op is right on the money.
 

KillerGopherFan

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Voter suppression is a right wing tactic that has been happening in one way or another for many years. The op is right on the money.
Care to provide some substantive statistically significant evidence to back that claim up rather than just anecdotal claims?
 

saintpaulguy

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Was I not PC? What specifically is your problem and maybe we can discuss? No, it’s much more powerful to pretend there’s something about it.
Well, expound on the the other reasons for both greater NFL participation and lower voting turnout. Do not plagiarize Al Campanis or Jimmy Snyder.
 

bga1

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Voter suppression is a right wing tactic that has been happening in one way or another for many years. The op is right on the money.
Maybe so. Illegal voting has been a left wing tactic for the same time period. Illegal voting is a good thing to suppress.
 

Bad Gopher

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Care to provide some substantive statistically significant evidence to back that claim up rather than just anecdotal claims?
Any anecdotal instance of voter suppression is a violation of the Constitution and every law that upholds and enforces the Constitution.
 

KillerGopherFan

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Any anecdotal instance of voter suppression is a violation of the Constitution and every law that upholds and enforces the Constitution.
Note that I said “anecdotal claim”. Claim does not mean proof. Proof would require some substantive corroboration, like statistically significant data and/or other corroborating facts.
 

KillerGopherFan

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Well, expound on the the other reasons for both greater NFL participation and lower voting turnout. Do not plagiarize Al Campanis or Jimmy Snyder.
Looks like you’re “expounding” for me. There could be many reasons other than having to do with race.
 

Bad Gopher

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Note that I said “anecdotal claim”. Claim does not mean proof. Proof would require some substantive corroboration, like statistically significant data and/or other corroborating facts.
The fact is that these American Indians are eligible voters, but their voting rights are being invalidated by an address technicality. Fact.
 

justthefacts

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Care to provide some substantive statistically significant evidence to back that claim up rather than just anecdotal claims?
Republicans have admitted that voter suppression is a political tactic:

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/17/...eraging-voter-id-laws-for-political-gain.html

Turnout was lower in states where ID laws changed – We found that total turnout increased in states where ID laws did not change between the 2012 and 2016 elections, but decreased in states where ID laws changed to strict. Specifically, in states where the voter identification laws did not change between ‘12 and ‘16, turnout was up +1.3%. In states where ID laws changed to non-strict (AL, NH, RI) turnout increased less, and was only up by +0.7%. In states where ID laws changed to strict (MS, VA, WI) turnout actually decreased by - 1.7%
Across the board, turnout decreased more between 2012 and 2016 in counties with higher population percentages of African Americans, but this drop-off in participation was amplified in states that changed voter-ID laws, and was most pronounced in states that changed voter ID laws to strict.
https://www.scribd.com/document/347821649/Priorities-USA-Voter-Suppression-Memo

A survey of registered voters in Dane and Milwaukee Counties who did not
vote in the 2016 presidential election found that 11.2% of eligible nonvoting registrants
were deterred by the Wisconsin’s voter ID law. This corresponds to 16,801 people in the
two counties deterred from voting, and could be as high as 23,252 based on the confidence
interval around the 11.2% estimate, which is between 7.8% and 15.5%. The survey further
found that 6% of nonvoters were prevented from voting because they lacked ID or cited ID
as the main reason they did not vote, which corresponds to 9,001 people, and could be as
high as 14,101 based on the confidence interval of between 3.5% and 9.4%.
Roughly 80% of registrants who were deterred from voting by the ID law, and 77% of
those prevented from voting, cast ballots in the 2012 election.
Based on these estimates, if all of the affected registrants voted the voter ID requirement
reduced turnout in the two counties by 2.24 percentage points under the main measure of
effect, and by 1.2 percentage points under a conservative measure. If they voted at 2012
rates, voter ID lowered turnout by 0.9 to 1.8 percentage points.

The burdens of voter ID fell disproportionately on low-income and minority populations.
Among low-income registrants (household income under $25,000), 21.1% were deterred,
compared to 7.2% for those over $25,000. Among high-income registrants (over $100,000
household income), 2.7% were deterred.
https://elections.wiscweb.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/483/2018/02/Voter-ID-Study-Release.pdf
 
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KillerGopherFan

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The fact is that these American Indians are eligible voters, but their voting rights are being invalidated by an address technicality. Fact.
Does the rule not hold for other than American Indians?
 
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KillerGopherFan

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And you’ve ascribed or assumed their motivations to the tightening of voter rules to illicit motives rather than concerns for voter integrity. How?
 

justthefacts

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And you’ve ascribed or assumed their motivations to the tightening of voter rules to illicit motives rather than concerns for voter integrity. How?
In April of this year, Representative Glenn Grothman, Republican of Wisconsin, predicted in a television interview that the state’s photo ID law would weaken the Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s chances of winning the state in November’s election.
Also in Wisconsin, Todd Allbaugh, 46, a staff aide to a Republican state legislator, attributed his decision to quit his job in 2015 and leave the party to what he witnessed at a Republican caucus meeting. He wrote on Facebook:

I was in the closed Senate Republican Caucus when the final round of multiple Voter ID bills were being discussed. A handful of the GOP Senators were giddy about the ramifications and literally singled out the prospects of suppressing minority and college voters. Think about that for a minute. Elected officials planning and happy to help deny a fellow American’s constitutional right to vote in order to increase their own chances to hang onto power.
And also that year, Scott Tranter, a Republican political consultant for Mr. Romney and others, called voter ID laws — and generating long lines at polling places — part of his party's tool kit.
In Florida, both the state’s former Republican Party chairman, Jim Greer, and its former Republican governor, Charlie Crist, told The Palm Beach Post in 2012 that the state’s voter ID law was devised to suppress Democratic votes. Mr. Greer told The Post: “The Republican Party, the strategists, the consultants, they firmly believe that early voting is bad for Republican Party candidates. It’s done for one reason and one reason only,” he said. Consultants told him “we’ve got to cut down on early voting because early voting is not good for us,” he said.

He added, “They never came in to see me and tell me we had a fraud issue. It’s all a marketing ploy.”
This is to say nothing of the fact that no one has ever demonstrated that voter fraud is a real issue, and so there can be no other true motive for wanting to increase the burdens to voting beside a political one. Kris Kobach failed miserably in his quest to prove voter fraud was a big problem, and he was certainly committed to the idea.

https://www.propublica.org/article/kris-kobach-voter-fraud-kansas-trial

But things didn’t go well for him in the Kansas City courtroom, as Robinson’s opinion made clear. Kobach’s strongest evidence of non-citizen registration was anemic at best: Over a 20-year period, fewer than 40 non-citizens had attempted to register in one Kansas county that had 130,000 voters. Most of those 40 improper registrations were the result of mistakes or confusion rather than intentional attempts to mislead, and only five of the 40 managed to cast a vote.

One of Kobach’s own experts even rebutted arguments made by both Kobach and President Donald Trump. The expert testified that a handful of improper registrations could not be extrapolated to conclude that 2.8 million fraudulent votes — roughly, the gap between Hillary Clinton and Trump in the popular vote tally — had been cast in the 2016 presidential election. Testimony from a second key expert for Kobach also fizzled.

As the judge’s opinion noted, Kobach insisted the meager instances of cheating revealed at trial are just “the tip of the iceberg.” As she explained, “This trial was his opportunity to produce credible evidence of that iceberg, but he failed to do so.” Dismissing the testimony by Kobach’s witnesses as unpersuasive, Robinson drew what she called “the more obvious conclusion that there is no iceberg; only an icicle largely created by confusion and administrative error.”
 
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tikited

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Maybe so. Illegal voting has been a left wing tactic for the same time period. Illegal voting is a good thing to suppress.
Maybe so? It is so and you can be correct with your claim as well. So, now what?
 

bga1

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Maybe so? It is so and you can be correct with your claim as well. So, now what?
Close the borders. Verify who is here. Require identification to vote. If people are not smart enough or able enough to get proper identification- they shouldn't vote.
 

Bad Gopher

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Maybe so? It is so and you can be correct with your claim as well. So, now what?
Agreed. If illegal voting is going on, then let's solve that problem. Nobody has been able to substantiate that problem, though, even Trump's blue-ribbon panel or whatever it was. You can't fix what you can't find. Meanwhile, the problem of voter suppression is pretty well established, not the least of which is gerrymandering. I've seen tons of analysis of what Congress would look like were it not for gerrymandering. Again, a well established fact, quantified and out in the open for all to see.
 
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