University of Minnesota won't use Minneapolis police officers for football games, other events in wake of George Floyd death

Gophersince72

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I am not sure why it matters whether he was declared dead at the scene or at the hospital, and we'll probably all see the reports eventually, but my understanding is that he was unresponsive at the scene and despite efforts to resuscitate him he was later declared dead at the hospital. I don't really care whether Mr. Floyd was diabetic, had a bad heart or was completely healthy. The officer pinned his neck with his knee for several minutes and he died while three other officers stood by and watched it happen. This isn't the first incident involving the MPD and, while as others have noted the decision can always be revisited, I can see why President Gable felt it was appropriate to act now. My guess is that the vast majority of the students and faculty will support her decision. (Not suggesting that she should base her decision on that, just pointing out that she probably won't get much blow back from the people she interacts with on a daily basis. More interesting to see if she gets any legislative push back.)
There's a detailed write-up in the Strib today. He was not breathing and had no pulse in the ambulance. Chest compressions, air bag, defibrillator, the whole works. They worked on him for an hour after he arrived at the hospital and eventually declared him dead there but he was already gone during the 6-minute ride to the hospital.
 

Goldteam

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Burns said Fleck has been on the phone for basically 36 hours now trying to speak with the recruits.

Stop burning your city down, idiots.
 

GopherGod

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Because things went so right, with the “professionals” in the MPD.
I like to play the odds and go with the professionals over amateurs. Same reason I don’t want a dental student or medical resident doing my treatments over a dentist or physician that has completed their training.
 

MplsGopher

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I like to play the odds and go with the professionals over amateurs. Same reason I don’t want a dental student or medical resident doing my treatments over a dentist or physician that has completed their training.
In this case, the dentist that has “completed their training” is showing up with a hacksaw and filthy, unwashed hands. No thanks
 

GopherGod

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No reason not to assume that most MPD officers are poorly trained when they allow a guy this bad on the squad.
You don’t understand odds and probability do you? So you make assumptions based on the exceptions or outliers rather than on the majority. Let me ask you, out of all rhe calls MPD goes on in a year, month, week, day, etc.., what percentage of calls end without incident versus those with bad outcomes?
 

Mulligan

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No one has answered my question. Did the PD say” since this dude is black, I will keep on the ground longer in order to do more punishment”? If so then what ever punishment doled out to the officers is warranted. But wouldtheir actions been different if the dude was white? I don’t know and neither do you. Certainly the communications would give some light.
JFC! Ya, their actions would have been different if the dude had been white. That cop had him pinned with his knee on his neck while the guy was hand-cuffed. And he kept it there despite Floyd repeatedly saying that he couldn't breathe. And, from all reports, he kept it there after Floyd passed out. I haven't seen one person in law enforcement say that anything proper was done.

It's chilling that the cop just kept the knee there, not changing expression and simply looking around like, "Ho-hum, another day at the office." It also speaks volumes about the Minneapolis PD that three officers with him, all with less seniority, didn't intervene. You bet your ass that wouldn't have happened with a white person.

I hate like hell that the rioting and looting has followed, but if I feel this anger, I can't imagine what a black person must be feeling. And then you actually ask would it have happened if "the dude" had been white. You're either clueless or worse.
 

#2Gopher

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Tough situation for Fleck. On another note I'm guessing that the U had complaints on the police and this was the sledge hammer that broke the camel's back. If I was a black student I would be doing cart wheels celebrating this move. Not a knee jerk decision as the Minneapolis police clearly have a horrible reputation.
 

60's Guy

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It is a decision the students will applaud. Hiring someone else to do game day security will be easy.
The question is, how often are the Minneapolis police interacting with University of MN students? There is a lot of off campus apartments. How does the U of M University Police force feel about the situation? Do they work hand in hand often? How strained will that relationship be? I don't know the answers.
The guy will be prosecuted. Is it knee jerk? Was there really no other choice given the current climate? I don't know.
While it is largely symbolic, it also seems pretty bold.
And maybe in just the short time the President has been here, she is fed up with their actions to date.
Again, lots of sides I don't know.
Hopefully, short term it helps make things more peaceful.
 

MplsGopher

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You don’t understand odds and probability do you? So you make assumptions based on the exceptions or outliers rather than on the majority. Let me ask you, out of all rhe calls MPD goes on in a year, month, week, day, etc.., what percentage of calls end without incident versus those with bad outcomes?
"Without incident", you mean when an innocent person wasn't killed. It doesn't happen often, anywhere. Hence why when such extreme negative happen, there need to be consequences.
 

Marooned

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Gotta imagine after all this that MPD will do what they can to restore faith and improve their image within the community. There’ll be changes.
 
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It's a great decision that is being nationally-lauded. Sends a message to the students that their safety is most important and the U will not look the other way just for convenience.

I'm certain the president of the University didn't just wake up and decide to do this. She is an educated, pragmatic woman to get to the position she is in. I'm sure she looked at the consequences if she made this decision and what resources she had to make things work without the MPD.

Hopefully more police departments will see this consequence and realize what lack of training or bad hiring will cost them. Trust me, this one hurts the checkbook. Plenty of officers love that OT pay for off-duty work like football games and events. So maybe one of them will intervene next time their colleague is using excessive force.

Now that all four lost their jobs, I'd be curious how much the other three are regretting not stepping in and doing something when they could have?
If the people watching this event hadn’t recorded the incident and voiced concern, there would’ve been a different response by the PD, I believe. We are responsible for holding police accountable. They don’t do it voluntarily.
 
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Th
You don’t understand odds and probability do you? So you make assumptions based on the exceptions or outliers rather than on the majority. Let me ask you, out of all rhe calls MPD goes on in a year, month, week, day, etc.., what percentage of calls end without incident versus those with bad outcomes?
I believe the problem is lack of accountability. It doesn’t matter what percentage is bad if they are not held responsible.
 
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"Without incident", you mean when an innocent person wasn't killed. It doesn't happen often, anywhere. Hence why when such extreme negative happen, there need to be consequences.
I think the problem is that police aren’t held accountable unless someone dies and the wrongdoing is documented by video. Too many instances where someone could’ve died, making the incident a non-story.
 

rowdaboat

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Who has the jurisdiction for arrests next time there's a Dinkytown hockey riot if they can't call in MPD and the university hall monitors aren't useful?
 

WriterGoph

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Who has the jurisdiction for arrests next time there's a Dinkytown hockey riot if they can't call in MPD and the university hall monitors aren't useful?
That's in the city of Minneapolis. MPD would still handles crimes and riots. It's not like it becomes a police-free zone, genius. The U simply said they won't be partnering with MPD or using them for extra events where they have a choice.
 

chri1673

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Gotta imagine after all this that MPD will do what they can to restore faith and improve their image within the community. There’ll be changes.
Hopefully this is the case as i believe a large majority of off campus housing falls in the in the Minneapolis Police Departments jurisdiction. One would hope they will do everything they can for everyone. As others have said i am not sure on the timing, I agree their needs to be direct consequences for what happened but there is already an extreme amount of attention (justifiable) on the MPD they may view it as piling on. I just hope it doesn't alienate them and lead to any issues protecting the Students who live off campus or any potential large scale incidences on campus.I do not believe it will be an issue with a majority of the police officers who will continue to act professionally but could affect a few .


Minneapolis Police Department
Many student frequent the Marcy Holmes (including Dinkytown) and Cedar-Riverside neighborhoods of Minneapolis which surround the University. Concerns regarding these areas should be directed to the Minneapolis Police Department. Contact information for these areas are:

Cedar-Riverside: 1st Precinct

Marcy Holmes (Dinkytown, Stadium Village), Como: 2nd Precinct
 

Go4Broke

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Hopefully this is the case as i believe a large majority of off campus housing falls in the in the Minneapolis Police Departments jurisdiction. One would hope they will do everything they can for everyone. As others have said i am not sure on the timing, I agree their needs to be direct consequences for what happened but there is already an extreme amount of attention (justifiable) on the MPD they may view it as piling on. I just hope it doesn't alienate them and lead to any issues protecting the Students who live off campus or any potential large scale incidences on campus.I do not believe it will be an issue with a majority of the police officers who will continue to act professionally but could affect a few.
The MPD has been alienating residents of Minneapolis for decades without being held accountable by anyone in a position of authority. The have been kowtowed to by mayors, city councils, public prosecutors, and state law enforcement authorities. Joan Gabel's action against the MPD is the first time in memory that a public official has had the courage to take them on.

Joan deserves a huge amount of credit for taking this action. U of M off campus students will be fine because the UMPD already responds to a large percentage of 911 calls involving students at off campus events. That percentage may go up in the future but it can only be a good thing to have better trained and more responsive police officers responding to calls involving U of M students.
 

Bob_Loblaw

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I think the problem is that police aren’t held accountable unless someone dies and the wrongdoing is documented by video. Too many instances where someone could’ve died, making the incident a non-story.
The problem for you is that people aren't held accountable without evidence? Gotcha!
 

Bob_Loblaw

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The MPD has been alienating residents of Minneapolis for decades without being held accountable by anyone in a position of authority. The have been kowtowed to by mayors, city councils, public prosecutors, and state law enforcement authorities. Joan Gabel's action against the MPD is the first time in memory that a public official has had the courage to take them on.

Joan deserves a huge amount of credit for taking this action. U of M off campus students will be fine because the UMPD already responds to a large percentage of 911 calls involving students at off campus events. That percentage may go up in the future but it can only be a good thing to have better trained and more responsive police officers responding to calls involving U of M students.
You realize this is a narrative in every single major city. The goalposts are set in a way that makes them impossible to reach. Large urban police departments have an impossible job and mistakes happen. Sometimes they hire people who are inept and sometimes they hire people who are sh!theads. It happens in every organization. It happened when a black cop killed a white woman and it happened when when Chauvin killed this victim. It's a messy thing to police an urban area.

The U is fine, they''ll be fine. They can contract this stuff out elsewhere. The only problem with it is that it incredibly illogical. A person part of a group did something awful and he is in the process of being punished accordingly.
 

GophersInIowa

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You realize this is a narrative in every single major city. The goalposts are set in a way that makes them impossible to reach. Large urban police departments have an impossible job and mistakes happen. Sometimes they hire people who are inept and sometimes they hire people who are sh!theads. It happens in every organization. It happened when a black cop killed a white woman and it happened when when Chauvin killed this victim. It's a messy thing to police an urban area.

The U is fine, they''ll be fine. They can contract this stuff out elsewhere. The only problem with it is that it incredibly illogical. A person part of a group did something awful and he is in the process of being punished accordingly.
I guess it's possible there have been issues with the MPD in the past and this was the last straw. I have no inside info on this, just a thought.
 

MRJ

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Burns said Fleck has been on the phone for basically 36 hours now trying to speak with the recruits.

Stop burning your city down, idiots.
Trust me, the conversations with these recruits have more to do with safety of the campus community and getting their input on how they're feeling overall more than anything else. Are the riots an issue? Of course, but I can guarantee you the bigger issue is the MPD and their conduct here.
 

Mulligan

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You realize this is a narrative in every single major city. The goalposts are set in a way that makes them impossible to reach. Large urban police departments have an impossible job and mistakes happen. Sometimes they hire people who are inept and sometimes they hire people who are sh!theads. It happens in every organization. It happened when a black cop killed a white woman and it happened when when Chauvin killed this victim. It's a messy thing to police an urban area.

The U is fine, they''ll be fine. They can contract this stuff out elsewhere. The only problem with it is that it incredibly illogical. A person part of a group did something awful and he is in the process of being punished accordingly.
Minimizing this a bit with the "Shit happens," aren't you? To begin, there is the fact it wasn't just one person. There were four cops there and two others were also on Floyd and the fourth just stood there. Something is very wrong when they kept at it despite Floyd's pleading knowing cameras were recording all this. They're showing the people watching that they're in power and there's nothing you can do about it. You're also ignoring the long standing history of the department's racism. They've got a long list of settled lawsuits for brutality, and there have been way more blacks disproportionally killed by the MPD over the years. The reaction to this death flared up big time, but the flame was lit long ago so you're being willfully stupid or very disingenuous with the it's one person with one incident so let's move on.

You're one who led the charge on how the black football players had their lives ruined with the lack of due process in the sexual assault scandal. Well, George Floyd had his life ruined a hell of a lot more with a whole lot less of a due process; yet I don't get even a tenth of the anger and indignation from you now. Your "mistakes happen" now as opposed to your analogies of kangaroo courts and even lynchings back then seems incredibly illogical.
 

WriterGoph

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Minimizing this a bit with the "Shit happens," aren't you? To begin, there is the fact it wasn't just one person. There were four cops there and two others were also on Floyd and the fourth just stood there. Something is very wrong when they kept at it despite Floyd's pleading knowing cameras were recording all this. They're showing the people watching that they're in power and there's nothing you can do about it. You're also ignoring the long standing history of the department's racism. They've got a long list of settled lawsuits for brutality, and there have been way more blacks disproportionally killed by the MPD over the years. The reaction to this death flared up big time, but the flame was lit long ago so you're being willfully stupid or very disingenuous with the it's one person with one incident so let's move on.

You're one who led the charge on how the black football players had their lives ruined with the lack of due process in the sexual assault scandal. Well, George Floyd had his life ruined a hell of a lot more with a whole lot less of a due process; yet I don't get even a tenth of the anger and indignation from you now. Your "mistakes happen" now as opposed to your analogies of kangaroo courts and even lynchings back then seems incredibly illogical.
Bravo
 
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Gophersince72

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Nope. The problem is when there is evidence but it isn’t public so there’s no accountability. Because police don’t like to look bad and they investigate themselves for the most part. See the Laquan McDonald case. https://www.chicagotribune.com/news...donald-officers-fired-timeline-htmlstory.html
Exactly. If the Floyd situation happened 10 years ago before body cameras and smart phone cameras, does anyone honestly think anything would have come from it? It would have been the hysterical claims of a dozen eyewitnesses against the testimony of 4 peace officers, presumed to be justified in everything they do.
 
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