The new Corona virus, should we worry?

Costa Rican Gopher

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Pregnancy suppresses your immune system so it doesn't attack the baby. Thats why it's a risk factor for dieing of covid. Oh well its worth it so you can go to the bar...
What % of Covid pregnant women are dying? How does that compare to pregnant women with the flu?
 

GoodasGold

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Just like food, it just tastes better if someone else makes it for you
Au contraire. When you prepare your own meals you are assured of the quality of all the food products being used. And the added benefit being that when you find the inevitable hair in your stew - whether it be long and blonde or short and curly - at least you know it’s home-grown; which significantly tones down the GaG reflex.
 

Wally

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Au contraire. When you prepare your own meals you are assured of the quality of all the food products being used. And the added benefit being that when you find the inevitable hair in your stew - whether it be long and blonde or short and curly - at least you know it’s home-grown; which significantly tones down the GaG reflex.
GoodasGold knows, he only eats home grown cherry pie.
 

GophersInIowa

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Anyone have an idea of how long after someone contracts Covid that they would test positive for it? Like for example someone gets Covid on Jan 1 but they don’t know it. They’re admitted a month later for something unrelated to Covid. Would they still test positive a month later if given a test?
 

BarnBurner

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Anyone have an idea of how long after someone contracts Covid that they would test positive for it? Like for example someone gets Covid on Jan 1 but they don’t know it. They’re admitted a month later for something unrelated to Covid. Would they still test positive a month later if given a test?
10 months later and YOU are asking that question. :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

After all your love for anything covid deaths and the "data"
 

MplsGopher

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SD not only leads the nation in % of residents already vaccinated (3.2%) but also in % of vaccines they have received being given (64.5%). Minnesota: 1.5% / 31.8%. Data.
Amazing when they give you like 17 offhand vaccine vials they had left over after distributing most of them to non third-world states, how quickly you can inoculate your 86 residents.
 

balds

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Amazing when they give you like 17 offhand vaccine vials they had left over after distributing most of them to non third-world states, how quickly you can inoculate your 86 residents.
So percentages and per capita are of use when counting cases and deaths, but not when counting vaccines given? SD has thousands less deaths than MN!
 

MplsGopher

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So percentages and per capita are of use when counting cases and deaths, but not when counting vaccines given? SD has thousands less deaths than MN!
Logistical complexity increases exponentially with number of vaccines that need to be administered.

Mask wearing and restriction/lockdown policy applies the same regardless of population. Plus the vast majority of South Dakotans respected mask wearing, distancing, and engaging in less risky behavior, even though their state government didn't require them to (as it should have).
 

howeda7

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Logistical complexity increases exponentially with number of vaccines that need to be administered.

Mask wearing and restriction/lockdown policy applies the same regardless of population. Plus the vast majority of South Dakotans respected mask wearing, distancing, and engaging in less risky behavior, even though their state government didn't require them to (as it should have).
Vast majority? No....
 

Gopher_In_NYC

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When you cannot trust the media, you draw your own conclusions. You are attempting to hold people accountable for drawing these conclusions while giving the dishonest media a pass. You want to protect the media because they present your viewpoint (which is a dishonest one).
We'd rather trust you LBGA:love:
 

MplsGopher

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Vast majority? No....
I could be wrong to use vast, but I highly doubt every person in the state was like Sturgis 24/7.

It doesn't take long for a relatively few bad actors to run amok and the accumulated badness to start taking off ...

Wouldn't surprise me at all if at least 80% of people living there were mostly good. Compared to say like 92% mostly good in Minnesota.
 

Spoofin

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So percentages and per capita are of use when counting cases and deaths, but not when counting vaccines given? SD has thousands less deaths than MN!
And being a rural state should help prevent COVID, but makes vaccine logistics easier. 🤷‍♂️
 

Pompous Elitist

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Let's say it was an accident. Sars2 is actually a genetic sequence created by loss/gain of function experimentation, and it accidentally got out due to reasons.

What does that "prove"?
That we can, but maybe shouldn’t. Now that time has settled tempers (a bit) more people are willing to acknowledge the real possibility and even probability this was an incidental lab release ( aaaand possibly lab created). Whether it was lab created via serial selective evolutionary pressures AKA gain of function AKA recombination (discussed in the fascinating linked article below) the experts with the insider knowledge are an insular, self-fellating group, like every key opinion leader group in every field. There are funding concerns, career concerns, political, national security concerns. Nobody wants to bring outsider criticism of their practices or funding...China certainly doesn’t want to take any responsibility and won’t allow a third party investigation.

In the last two (underrated?) Alien films Prometheus and Covenant one of the themes is the hubris of the ancient Engineers, their creation humankind, and human-created AI, ie David, subsequently destroying the Engineers and via experimentation genetically engineering an even more perfect xenomorph. The cat is out of the bag on how to create more virulent and transmissible viruses in the lab.. but maybe we shouldn’t encourage or fund this sort of research just because we can, rather more relevant issues like rapid vaccine development and distribution.



The Lab-Leak Hypothesis
For decades, scientists have been hot-wiring viruses in hopes of preventing a pandemic, not causing one. But what if …?

By Nicholson Baker


...Baric, Jonna Mazet, and Peter Daszak of EcoHealth worked together for years — and Daszak also routed Predict money to Shi Zhengli’s bat-surveillance team in Wuhan through his nonprofit, mingling it with NIH money and money from the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency. In 2013, Mazet announced that Shi Zhengli’s virus hunters, with Predict’s support, had, for the first time, isolated and cultured a live SARS-like virus from bats and demonstrated that this virus could bind to the human ACE2, or “angiotensin-converting enzyme 2,” receptor, which Baric’s laboratory had determined to be the sine qua non of human infectivity. “This work shows that these viruses can directly infect humans and validates our assumption that we should be searching for viruses of pandemic potential before they spill over to people,” Mazet said.

Daszak, for his part, seems to have viewed his bat quests as part of an epic, quasi-religious death match. In a paper from 2008, Daszak and a co-author described Bruegel’s painting The Fall of the Rebel Angels and compared it to the contemporary human biological condition. The fallen angels could be seen as pathogenic organisms that had descended “through an evolutionary (not spiritual) pathway that takes them to a netherworld where they can feed only on our genes, our cells, our flesh,” Daszak wrote. “Will we succumb to the multitudinous horde? Are we to be cast downward into chthonic chaos represented here by the heaped up gibbering phantasmagory against which we rail and struggle?”




 
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Wally

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From the Trump NY Post

COVID anti-masker gasps for breath as he issues plea from hospital bed
 

Wally

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US rollout disaster leaves more than 70 percent of COVID-19 vaccines unused
More than 70 percent of COVID-19 vaccines are still sitting in freezers in the US — as the country’s disastrous rollout has forced desperate Florida senior citizens to camp out overnight for their shot.

Hundreds braved chilly 40-degree temperatures and slept in their cars overnight in Daytona Beach in the mad rush for inoculations, NBC Miami reported.

What happened to operation warp speeds plans for getting the vaccine out?
Grade F
 

MplsGopher

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And being a rural state should help prevent COVID, but makes vaccine logistics easier. 🤷‍♂️
Rural people are used to driving hours per day to run errands. They won't think twice about driving into to Rapid City/Spearfish for their shots. Etc.
 

MplsGopher

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That we can, but maybe shouldn’t.
...
maybe we shouldn’t encourage or fund this sort of research just because we can, rather more relevant issues like rapid vaccine development and distribution.
Thanks for sharing the article, and your opinions. I only clipped them to focus on the pieces I want to respond to, not because I want to prevent people from reading them (anyone pissed off that I clipped the quote .... all you have to do is click on "Pompous Elitist said:" at the top of the quote box and it hyperlinks you right up to the actual post, even if it's on a different page, so I'll no longer have sympathy for you)


If this is the type of research that ultimately leads us to the best scientific knowledge of how viruses work, and thus how best to defeat them, then I'll never agree with cutting funding for it.

Obviously it would've been better if there was no global pandemic. I would choose that, over the massive gains in virology and vaccine science that happened because of the immense pressure and focus placed by the pandemic. But I won't pretend that we should disavow those gains that did happen because of that. And particularly in the mRNA vaccine development, Nobel prizes are on order.


For all we know (maybe next to nothing), if there was an accidental release, it was because of underfunding. Obviously more money and attention should then be put on preventing this from happening again.

That would be my vote.
 
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