The new Corona virus, should we worry?

cncmin

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Correct - distancing, shielding, masks, ventilation. Permanently Closing schools is an extreme position.
FIFY

Here's a personal datapoint to consider. Early on in the pandemic, my company had a bunch of cases of Covid. To stop the spread, my company shut down and forced everyone who wasn't directly necessary to on-site operations to telework for several weeks as they got things under control. They instituted mask wearing and personal distancing as mandatory, subject to dismissal/firing. Everyone wears masks onsite. We have had no known on-site transmission since. We have been increasing on-site frequency ever since. We have had off-site cases. Those who get sick due to offsite transmission must take medical time off or use up their vacation. Those who are in contact with others who have Covid must quarantine for two weeks. It's their responsibility, their risk. Our company has stated that if viral spread appears to get out of control amongst the workforce, we will be forced to telework again, and we have made contingency plans to do so if that becomes reality.

Our workforce production rate is estimated to be about 90% of that pre-Covid by analysis of a variety of metrics.

Our rate of Covid amongst our worforce is very far below the national rate.
 
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Pompous Elitist

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Of course it's not equivalent. But in many cases it is necessary. In other cases, it's probably not necessary. This is the position I've explicitly stated above. What's your point? You seem to be trying very hard to argue against a position I'm not making.
What is your position, then?

. PE, I think shutting down the schools to mitigate outbreaks is part of the reason why spread among schools has been relatively low. The schools are mainly doing this correctly. If only the broader public would follow suit.
.
Potentially. If a bunch of kids are actively sick an the virus appears to be spreading, shut downs are plenty logical. Notably, the schools have also done an admirable job of setting up tele-schooling options. The problem is less the tele-schooling, but the effect this has on working parents of the school-aged kids and their schedules.

Everyone (almost) wants the schools to be open. To do so, the virus needs to be under control. It's that simple.
I’ve argued schools should open, with modifications. My impression is you disagree with that position since you stated above school closures have had an impact on community spread, which hasn’t really been found to be true. And, even if it were true to some extent the negatives outweigh the positives of such policy, per experts in relevant fields.

So, I’m perplexed on your position.
 

Pompous Elitist

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FIFY

Here's a personal datapoint to consider. Early on in the pandemic, my company had a bunch of cases of Covid. To stop the spread, my company shut down and forced everyone who wasn't directly necessary to on-site operations to telework for several weeks as they got things under control. They instituted mask wearing and personal distancing as mandatory, subject to dismissal/firing. Everyone wears masks onsite. We have had no known on-site transmission since. We have been increasing on-site frequency ever since. We have had off-site cases. Those who get sick due to offsite transmission must take medical time off or use up their vacation. Those who are in contact with others who have Covid must quarantine for two weeks. It's their responsibility, their risk. Our company has stated that if viral spread appears to get out of control amongst the workforce, we will be forced to telework again, and we have made contingency plans to do so if that becomes reality.

Our workforce production rate is estimated to be about 90% of that pre-Covid by analysis of a variety of metrics.

Our rate of Covid amongst our worforce is very far below the national rate.
^^^

What does any of this have to do with schools, intra-school spread, intra-family spread, or child development and education?

It’s almost as if you refuse to review the evidence.
 

cncmin

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What is your position, then?





I’ve argued schools should open, with modifications. My impression is you disagree with that position since you stated above school closures have had an impact on community spread, which hasn’t really been found to be true. And, even if it were true to some extent the negatives outweigh the positives of such policy, per experts in relevant fields.

So, I’m perplexed on your position.
My position is that schools should be open so long as Covid rates are either zero or very low; and that it is up to school administrators to do what they think is right in the event of what they feel is excessive transmittal. Some will overdo it, some will under-do it. Those who overdo it will be criticized, and many of those will tamp back. Those who under-do it will be criticized, and many of those will increase protocols. We will iterate toward a common set of protocols over time, and it's not worth being over-dramatic about things that aren't directly affecting you.
 

cncmin

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^^^

What does any of this have to do with schools, intra-school spread, intra-family spread, or child development and education?

It’s almost as if you refuse to review the evidence.
Simple. Temporary shutdowns to get things under control work.

Why are you getting so bent out of shape about these temporary shutdowns, especially those that aren't in your personal school districts? In what way are these shutdowns harming you?
 

Pompous Elitist

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Simple. Temporary shutdowns to get things under control work.

Why are you getting so bent out of shape about these temporary shutdowns, especially those that aren't in your personal school districts? In what way are these shutdowns harming you?
Temporary has become permanent in many places. How do school shutdowns significantly reduce spread?

I‘m not bent out of shape, just perplexed by your arguments. Do you have any scientific basis for your position? What, eg would be the max number of cases per 100,000 residents before you pull the plug, or use as a reopening number. On what basis are these numbers arrived at?

Please post some evidence to support your position. You continue to be obtuse.
 
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Pompous Elitist

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My position is that schools should be open so long as Covid rates are either zero or very low; and that it is up to school administrators to do what they think is right in the event of what they feel is excessive transmittal. Some will overdo it, some will under-do it. Those who overdo it will be criticized, and many of those will tamp back. Those who under-do it will be criticized, and many of those will increase protocols. We will iterate toward a common set of protocols over time, and it's not worth being over-dramatic about things that aren't directly affecting you.
Really? You're basing policy on public opinion? Misinformation? Now, in late 2020?

You're being ridiculous, unable to put forth a real argument for your zero or close to zero position. I thought non-scientific arguments were for the feckless idiots in the White House?
 

GophersInIowa

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South Dakota has now announced the equivalent of over 1,100 deaths in MN over the past 5 days. They've quickly moved up the list and are now have the 10th highest deaths per million in the US.
 

GoodasGold

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South Dakota has now announced the equivalent of over 1,100 deaths in MN over the past 5 days. They've quickly moved up the list and are now have the 10th highest deaths per million in the US.
They earned it! Kudos to the Guv.
 

Wally

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My position is that schools should be open so long as Covid rates are either zero or very low; and that it is up to school administrators to do what they think is right in the event of what they feel is excessive transmittal. Some will overdo it, some will under-do it. Those who overdo it will be criticized, and many of those will tamp back. Those who under-do it will be criticized, and many of those will increase protocols. We will iterate toward a common set of protocols over time, and it's not worth being over-dramatic about things that aren't directly affecting you.
I am glad my kids school said they will stay open unless they don't have teachers or the state forces them to close.

Only problem is they are shuting grades for 14 days with a positive, if community spread is high enough it could effectivly close the school.
 

Wally

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On another note, Praise Trump. He has kept his base safe from the hoax...🤣

According to data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, rural Americans are dying at rates 3.45 times higher than Americans living in metropolitan areas.
 

MplsGopher

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The point is, when Minnesota's numbers go down because of the 4-week lockdown -- as they objectively will -- you will be wrong and proven as a fraud once again.
 

Wally

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Minnesota is on the same path, just a week or two behind SD. Were you trying to make a point again?
We are more than that behind.
How much you want to bet when this is done S Dakota has more deaths per capita. I will spot you 20%.
 

Wally

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MN would have to average 140 Covid deaths a day for two weeks to catch up to South Dakota. MN is currently averaging 48.
And we have the disadvantage of all the morons going across the boarders to WI, IA, SD and ND to go to the bars and restaurants.
 

Wally

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Douth dakota vs Vermont, both Republican governors.

"What I did in South Dakota is what we say Republicans always believe," Noem says. "We just did it. We just did it, and look at what is happening in our state."

One of the things happening in South Dakota is an infection rate that's among the worst in the nation, at about 8,000 cases per 100,000 people.

In Vermont, another small, rural state with a Republican governor, Gov. Phil Scott has embraced safety measures, and the differences are pretty stark. Like South Dakota, Vermont has fewer than 1 million residents, most of whom don't live in cities. It has about 500 cases per 100,000 people. That's the lowest rate in the nation.
 

short ornery norwegian

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Beds-in-use site has not been updated as of Noon Monday. I'll check later.

MN Covid-19 Update - Mon, Nov 23

data reported by 4pm the previous day.

Positive cases 271,557 +6,070. (positive test rate 10.8%)

Health-Care workers with positive cases 20,638 +340.

Cases no longer requiring isolation 227,311 +7,591.

Active Cases 41,041 -1,555.

Deaths 3,205 +24.

Deaths at long-term care and assisted living 2,204 +8.

total patients Hospitalized-cumulative 15,106 +177.

Total patients in ICU-cumulative 3,480 +28.

Total tests processed 3,756,777 +56,081.

Number of people tested 2,340,776 +26,682.
 

short ornery norwegian

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Pompous -

the reason my local school district went to distance learning is:

they had so many teachers on quarantine due to positive tests AND close contacts requiring quarantine that they did not have enough teachers left to conduct classes in person.

teachers on quarantine can teach from home by distance learning. they can't teach in-person classes.

a LOT of school districts are having a very difficult time finding substitute teachers. a lot of the subs are older and are opting out.

believe me, my local superintendent wants the kids at school in person. he just ran out of teachers.

no conspiracy, no plot, no political agenda. can't teach without teachers. it's that simple.
 

howeda7

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Douth dakota vs Vermont, both Republican governors.

"What I did in South Dakota is what we say Republicans always believe," Noem says. "We just did it. We just did it, and look at what is happening in our state."

One of the things happening in South Dakota is an infection rate that's among the worst in the nation, at about 8,000 cases per 100,000 people.

In Vermont, another small, rural state with a Republican governor, Gov. Phil Scott has embraced safety measures, and the differences are pretty stark. Like South Dakota, Vermont has fewer than 1 million residents, most of whom don't live in cities. It has about 500 cases per 100,000 people. That's the lowest rate in the nation.
"we just did it. "we just did it." Did what, exactly Kristi?
 
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