Texas energy situation and green new deal

RememberMurray

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Why are the feds bailing out Texas from a situation they created entirely on their own thru bad decisions. This is bs.
So they can thaw out, and then finally and for all time carry out their eternal threat to secede — and leave the rest of us alone.
 

BarnBurner

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WALLACE! Murray and Shill Pauli avoid the issue and spin/pivot.

Not sure why Murray doesn't give up his gas fired furnace. :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 

saintpaulguy

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WALLACE! Murray and Shill Pauli avoid the issue and spin/pivot.

Not sure why Murray doesn't give up his gas fired furnace. :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
Yes, I’ve said I am pro nuclear power and pointed out the difficulty of storing renewable energy. I‘m not sure you actually read anything before reacting. It is fine with me if you want to mark up my posts with emojis and sing song taunts, but the literate folks here will wonder if you are tripping balls.
 

BarnBurner

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Yes, I’ve said I am pro nuclear power and pointed out the difficulty of storing renewable energy. I‘m not sure you actually read anything before reacting. It is fine with me if you want to mark up my posts with emojis and sing song taunts, but the literate folks here will wonder if you are tripping balls.
Are you pro solar?
 

saintpaulguy

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Are you pro solar?
As a means of mass generation, no. For households, sure. i have portable panels of my own I use for camping. Works great. Great idea for off the grid properties.
Its supplemental.
 

BarnBurner

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As a means of mass generation, no. For households, sure. i have portable panels of my own I use for camping. Works great. Great idea for off the grid properties.
Its supplemental.
Why not for mass generation?
 

saintpaulguy

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Why not for mass generation?
Not reliable full time, without storage, and there is a lot of entropy if you try to store solar power. The best spots for mass solar are far from people, making transmission losses higher. Some advances in technology may help, but right now, it’s a supplemental power source.
 

BarnBurner

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Not reliable full time, without storage, and there is a lot of entropy if you try to store solar power. The best spots for mass solar are far from people, making transmission losses higher. Some advances in technology may help, but right now, it’s a supplemental power source.
Hmm. No mention of panel waste. Interesting.
 

saintpaulguy

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Any extraction from the earth comes with it a potential for environmental degradation, as well as every manufacturing process. Properly handled, these can be mitigated. Your cell phone is an environmental disaster, and the manufacture of them far eclipses solar panels. This isn’t a reason to build solar farms, but I didn’t think it the most important criticism of them either.
 

RememberMurray

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Jerry Jones' Company Hits 'Jackpot' As Harsh Storms Send Natural Gas Prices Surging

The winter storms gripping much of the United States have devastated many families and businesses, with frigid temperatures and power outages causing particularly dire conditions in Texas.

But for oil and gas producers that have managed to keep production going, this is proving to be a big payday. Jerry Jones, the billionaire owner of the Dallas Cowboys, appears to be one of the beneficiaries.

Comstock Resources Inc., a shale driller that operates in Texas and Louisiana, told investors on an earnings call this week that the surge in natural gas prices was providing it with a major — albeit almost certainly temporary — financial boost. The company is publicly traded but Jones holds a majority of the shares.

"Obviously, this week is like hitting the jackpot," President and Chief Financial Officer Roland Burns said Wednesday.

The storm has reduced natural gas output at the same time that demand — for both home heating and power generation — has skyrocketed.

That's resulted in catastrophic shortages, as well as some truly eye-popping prices for natural gas in the affected regions.

Many in the oil and gas industry have taken a blow because wells and pipelines have stopped working in the unexpected cold.

 

Wally

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It is fine with me if you want to mark up my posts with emojis and sing song taunts, but the literate folks here will wonder if you are tripping balls.
Barnturd contributes nothing of value.
 

BarnBurner

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Any extraction from the earth comes with it a potential for environmental degradation, as well as every manufacturing process. Properly handled, these can be mitigated. Your cell phone is an environmental disaster, and the manufacture of them far eclipses solar panels. This isn’t a reason to build solar farms, but I didn’t think it the most important criticism of them either.
Doesn't have to be extraction. Potential is a big, big word. And is used eagerly when pushing a narrative.
 

Wally

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Doesn't have to be extraction. Potential is a big, big word. And is used eagerly when pushing a narrative.
Its better when you post someone else's gifs...
This, well how could anyone respond because who knows what you're saying...
 

BarnBurner

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Its better when you post someone else's gifs...
This, well how could anyone respond because who knows what you're saying...
Your a dunce, WALLACE. I pray for the rest of your family
 

MplsGopher

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Storing AC current is a bitch.
Is it? I heard that AC current transfers to kinetic energy quite well via electric motors. Then if you use those motors to convert that kinetic energy to potential energy (like from lifting a very heavy object to a high place, for example), then Bob's your uncle.
 

MplsGopher

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Not reliable full time, without storage, and there is a lot of entropy if you try to store solar power. The best spots for mass solar are far from people, making transmission losses higher. Some advances in technology may help, but right now, it’s a supplemental power source.
Lots of entropy? Hmm.

Transmission losses are very, very minor, when you're talking hundreds of thousands of volts, as are used for long distance t-lines.
 

saintpaulguy

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Is it? I heard that AC current transfers to kinetic energy quite well via electric motors. Then if you use those motors to convert that kinetic energy to potential energy (like from lifting a very heavy object to a high place, for example), then Bob's your uncle.
I was thinking of batteries. Your description is accurate.
Some Iowa ethanol plats use windmills to pump groundwater to a holding tank and release the water back down the hole to make electricity. You have to spin the turbine.
it still amuses me that a nuclear reactor is a fancy way to make steam.
 

RememberMurray

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The natural gas plants in Texas froze! Oil fired plants really only exist to assist with peak loads. Very small, very few.
If it were just a poor design of the windmills all would have been ok.
Presenting facts will never convince them. They hear someone on the right yell, "Windmills! AOC! Green New Deal!", and they all start baying at the moon.
 

GopherWeatherGuy

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Presenting facts will never convince them. They hear someone on the right yell, "Windmills! AOC! Green New Deal!", and they all start baying at the moon.
What facts are those? You still haven’t answered my question. How are we getting to 100% carbon free and keeping the lights on for everyone?
 

RememberMurray

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What facts are those? You still haven’t answered my question. How are we getting to 100% carbon free and keeping the lights on for everyone?
Question 1: As SPG mentioned, the fact that the natural gas plants in Texas froze.

Question 2: I don't know that we can get to 100% carbon free. I don't believe I ever said we could.
 

GoodasGold

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When the air gets real cold it condenses and becomes too thick for wind blades to cut through it and turbines overheat and then fail. Unlike natural gas refineries and coal powered plants which can operate seamlessly even when its raining. 🕺
 

GopherWeatherGuy

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Question 1: As SPG mentioned, the fact that the natural gas plants in Texas froze.

Question 2: I don't know that we can get to 100% carbon free. I don't believe I ever said we could.
Some natural gas plants did freeze. Some didn't.

The blackouts occurred because we need fossil fuels to prevent them. Building more wind/solar won't change that. Building more nuclear would.
 

RememberMurray

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Some natural gas plants did freeze. Some didn't.

The blackouts occurred because we need fossil fuels to prevent them. Building more wind/solar won't change that. Building more nuclear would.

What went wrong in Texas?

The extreme cold is increasing energy demand at the same time the storm has reduced energy generation. One of the major causes for the energy shortage has been the impact on natural gas, coal, and nuclear facilities.

Dan Woodfin, a senior director for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, told Bloomberg frozen instruments at natural gas, coal, and nuclear facilities and limited supplies of natural gas is the main reason for widespread energy shortages.

“We’ve had some issues with pretty much every kind of generating capacity in the course of this multi-day event,” he told Bloomberg.


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Texas leaders failed to heed warnings that left the state's power grid vulnerable to winter extremes, experts say
Texas officials knew winter storms could leave the state’s power grid vulnerable, but they left the choice to prepare for harsh weather up to the power companies — many of which opted against the costly upgrades. That, plus a deregulated energy market largely isolated from the rest of the country’s power grid, left the state alone to deal with the crisis, experts said.

While Texas Republicans were quick to pounce on renewable energy and to blame frozen wind turbines, the natural gas, nuclear and coal plants that provide most of the state’s energy also struggled to operate during the storm. Officials with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the energy grid operator for most of the state, said that the state’s power system was simply no match for the deep freeze.

“Nuclear units, gas units, wind turbines, even solar, in different ways — the very cold weather and snow has impacted every type of generator,” said Dan Woodfin, a senior director at ERCOT.

Policy observers blamed the power system failure on the legislators and state agencies who they say did not properly heed the warnings of previous storms or account for more extreme weather events warned of by climate scientists. Instead, Texas prioritized the free market.

“Clearly we need to change our regulatory focus to protect the people, not profits,” said Tom “Smitty” Smith, a now-retired former director of Public Citizen, an Austin-based consumer advocacy group who advocated for changes after in 2011 when Texas faced a similar energy crisis.

“Instead of taking any regulatory action, we ended up getting guidelines that were unenforceable and largely ignored in [power companies’] rush for profits,” he said.

It is possible to “winterize” natural gas power plants, natural gas production, wind turbines and other energy infrastructure, experts said, through practices like insulating pipelines. These upgrades help prevent major interruptions in other states with regularly cold weather.

 

GopherWeatherGuy

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What went wrong in Texas?

The extreme cold is increasing energy demand at the same time the storm has reduced energy generation. One of the major causes for the energy shortage has been the impact on natural gas, coal, and nuclear facilities.

Dan Woodfin, a senior director for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, told Bloomberg frozen instruments at natural gas, coal, and nuclear facilities and limited supplies of natural gas is the main reason for widespread energy shortages.

“We’ve had some issues with pretty much every kind of generating capacity in the course of this multi-day event,” he told Bloomberg.


----------

Texas leaders failed to heed warnings that left the state's power grid vulnerable to winter extremes, experts say
Texas officials knew winter storms could leave the state’s power grid vulnerable, but they left the choice to prepare for harsh weather up to the power companies — many of which opted against the costly upgrades. That, plus a deregulated energy market largely isolated from the rest of the country’s power grid, left the state alone to deal with the crisis, experts said.

While Texas Republicans were quick to pounce on renewable energy and to blame frozen wind turbines, the natural gas, nuclear and coal plants that provide most of the state’s energy also struggled to operate during the storm. Officials with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the energy grid operator for most of the state, said that the state’s power system was simply no match for the deep freeze.

“Nuclear units, gas units, wind turbines, even solar, in different ways — the very cold weather and snow has impacted every type of generator,” said Dan Woodfin, a senior director at ERCOT.

Policy observers blamed the power system failure on the legislators and state agencies who they say did not properly heed the warnings of previous storms or account for more extreme weather events warned of by climate scientists. Instead, Texas prioritized the free market.

“Clearly we need to change our regulatory focus to protect the people, not profits,” said Tom “Smitty” Smith, a now-retired former director of Public Citizen, an Austin-based consumer advocacy group who advocated for changes after in 2011 when Texas faced a similar energy crisis.

“Instead of taking any regulatory action, we ended up getting guidelines that were unenforceable and largely ignored in [power companies’] rush for profits,” he said.

It is possible to “winterize” natural gas power plants, natural gas production, wind turbines and other energy infrastructure, experts said, through practices like insulating pipelines. These upgrades help prevent major interruptions in other states with regularly cold weather.

It's always the governments fault if they're republicans right? Why did Jerry Jones' plants make millions while others didn't? Must have been the government right? It wasn't.

Billions have been spent over the last two decades in building wind energy across Texas, mainly subsidized by plans supported by democratic presidents. How much did those billions of taxpayer dollars spent help in this situation? Anywhere from 4-15% depending on the day, but it was on the lower end when energy was needed the most.

Maybe more federal subsidies should be spent on winterizing plants down south rather than building more renewable energy that will always only provide a tiny fraction of help when weather conditions are most severe.
 

cncmin

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This is over an hour long but the best discussion you will hear of what has happened in texas losing energy and also relating it to the green new deal. Crenshaw is really good. I go back and forth between him and Desantis for 2024.

Crenshaw is a jackass. As for the "Green New Deal", it had zero, zip, nada to do with any of the problems Texas just went through, in which the main fossil fuel sources of energy were the most important part of the failure. How do you get sucked so easily into believing BS like this?
 
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