RIP Internal Combustion Engine - General Motors to go all-electric by 2035 and carbon-neutral by 2040

saintpaulguy

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It's brutally cold and it's going to remain that way for at least the next two weeks. With this weather we are only able to generate less than 5% of our electrical demand in MISO via renewable energy.

80% of our electricity is coming from coal and natural gas, and a little over 15% via nuclear.

How do people propose we are going to prevent people from freezing to death when we're forced to rely on 100% renewable energy?

My furnace does not run on gasoline. There is a difference between fuel for cars, and power for the electric grid. And it’s fair to point out that some, even most, of these clean electric cars will be powered by fossil fuels.
I really think we need to revisit nuclear power.
 
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saintpaulguy

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I don’t believe in subsidies. You do.
You like spending others $$$$.
You have an odd clairvoyance for other people’s opinions. I did not advocate for any subsidy in my post at all, yet you insist I’m in favor of them.
 

GopherWeatherGuy

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My furnace does not run on gasoline. There is a difference between fuel for cars, and power for the electric grid. And it’s fair to point out that some, even most, of these clean electric cars will be powered by fossil fuels.
I really think we need to revisit nuclear power.
I agree, the ban on building new nuclear energy plants needs to end everywhere in the US.
 

BarnBurner

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You have an odd clairvoyance for other people’s opinions. I did not advocate for any subsidy in my post at all, yet you insist I’m in favor of them.
You advocate for more “clean” energy, correct?
 

saintpaulguy

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30 percent of Xcel electricity is from nuclear power. If coal comes off line as is mandated, renewables are not ready to take up the slack. It will either be natural gas or nuclear.
 

saintpaulguy

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Simple yes or no , st Pauli. Or hide.
Why wait for an answer when you know? There’s a term in the English language for pre judging people you dislike. Don’t pretend to listen now. It never stops you from knowing what I’m going to say. It’s easier this way. I don’t have to jump through your hoops, and you don’t have to pretend to listen, and you can continue your fiction.
I have no animosity toward people who disagree with me. I learn stuff here from them. You seem to base our interactions on some kind of odd feud that isn’t really interesting to me.
You get a lot of praise here for your persistence, and on a scale of one to five, you are a five. It’s not a personality trait that should always peg the needle, a three is more ideal.
TLDR version: If I don’t respond to you, it isn’t because you won the day with your intellect, it’s because you managed to annoy me. There is a difference between acceptance and resignation.
 

BarnBurner

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Why wait for an answer when you know? There’s a term in the English language for pre judging people you dislike. Don’t pretend to listen now. It never stops you from knowing what I’m going to say. It’s easier this way. I don’t have to jump through your hoops, and you don’t have to pretend to listen, and you can continue your fiction.
I have no animosity toward people who disagree with me. I learn stuff here from them. You seem to base our interactions on some kind of odd feud that isn’t really interesting to me.
You get a lot of praise here for your persistence, and on a scale of one to five, you are a five. It’s not a personality trait that should always peg the needle, a three is more ideal.
TLDR version: If I don’t respond to you, it isn’t because you won the day with your intellect, it’s because you managed to annoy me. There is a difference between acceptance and resignation.
Modus Operandi.

When you prove me correct time and again, yes there are terms to use, st pauli d shill. And when I take you to task and expose your lies, ................

Very easy question to answer yes or no, and you wouldn't do it. There is a reason you didnt want to answer, and it is obvious. Continue your games.......

And hide, as predicted!
 

Angry

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It's brutally cold and it's going to remain that way for at least the next two weeks. With this weather we are only able to generate less than 5% of our electrical demand in MISO via renewable energy.

80% of our electricity is coming from coal and natural gas, and a little over 15% via nuclear.

How do people propose we are going to prevent people from freezing to death when we're forced to rely on 100% renewable energy?

Places like Minnesota will always require a diverse array of energy options. Places like Cali can afford to have rolling blackouts. I’m fine with climate area’s like that being the guinea pigs. We’ll probably solve the energy storage issue in the next 50 years. Until then keep improving existing forms of energy production. You know common sense.
 

Wally

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To bad Covid didn't wipe out 50% of the human race. There is still hope with mutation...
 

MplsGopher

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30 percent of Xcel electricity is from nuclear power. If coal comes off line as is mandated, renewables are not ready to take up the slack. It will either be natural gas or nuclear.
They're already building or built natural gas to replace one coal plant, I thought I had read.
 

MplsGopher

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Ford says it will phase out gasoline-powered vehicles in Europe
Ford Motor became the latest automaker to accelerate its transition to electric cars, saying Wednesday that its European division would soon begin to phase out vehicles powered by fossil fuels. By 2026, the company will offer only electric and plug-in hybrid models, and by 2030 all passenger cars will run solely on batteries.

The plan is part of a bid to generate steady profits in Europe, where Ford has struggled for several years, as well as to meet increasingly strict emissions standards in the European Union.

“We are going all in on electric vehicles,” Stuart Rowley, president of Ford of Europe, said during a news conference.

Ford and other automakers are moving more rapidly on electric vehicles in Europe than in the United States. Last year, the European Union began imposing penalties on carmakers that do not adhere to limits on carbon dioxide emissions, forcing them to sell more electric cars.
 

MplsGopher

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Watched an interesting YouTube video someone had put together about battery electric vehicles reaching the tipping point for mass adoption.

The video argued that, it's not really the price or even the range that's the last barrier at this point, rather it's the time to recharge.

The couple main points are:
- it's something like $250-350k to build a DC fast-charge station. Companies like Tesla (and some others) are building them out, but slowly. Obviously a chicken & egg scenario: you need to build out the network to get people on board, but you need people to buy the cars to be able to afford to build out the network

- the other really interesting thing: batteries don't charge linearly with time. I think it was saying something like only the first say 40% (?) of the charge added to the battery goes quickly, and is where having a high voltage DC fast-charger makes a big difference. The last whatever percentage trickles in, no matter how high-powered your charger, and thus takes a relatively long time.

So actually, the optimal thing to do if you're trying to take a road trip in a battery electric, is to only charge it for like the first 15 minutes on a fast-charger, then go for 100mi, charge again, go again, etc.


Most of the time, people aren't taking long road trips. But it is still an important part of the equation.
 

MennoSota

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I don’t believe in subsidies. You do.
You like spending others $$$$.
... especially the billions in Covid aid given to other nations around the world while the poor in the US get a $600 check. Such a blessing from my pocketbook to the jihadists of the world...
 

MplsGopher

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You better hope fusion power plants become viable before the earth implodes in the next 5 years as Greta has warned...
The Earth isn't imploding in 5, 10, or 15 years from now.

We already have fusion: the sun. Covering something like 10-20% (or so) of our uninhabited desert in solar would provide enough power output to cover the needs of the country. Just a matter of constructing efficient, cost-effective storage.
 

From the Parkinglot

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Watched an interesting YouTube video someone had put together about battery electric vehicles reaching the tipping point for mass adoption.

The video argued that, it's not really the price or even the range that's the last barrier at this point, rather it's the time to recharge.

The couple main points are:
- it's something like $250-350k to build a DC fast-charge station. Companies like Tesla (and some others) are building them out, but slowly. Obviously a chicken & egg scenario: you need to build out the network to get people on board, but you need people to buy the cars to be able to afford to build out the network

- the other really interesting thing: batteries don't charge linearly with time. I think it was saying something like only the first say 40% (?) of the charge added to the battery goes quickly, and is where having a high voltage DC fast-charger makes a big difference. The last whatever percentage trickles in, no matter how high-powered your charger, and thus takes a relatively long time.

So actually, the optimal thing to do if you're trying to take a road trip in a battery electric, is to only charge it for like the first 15 minutes on a fast-charger, then go for 100mi, charge again, go again, etc.


Most of the time, people aren't taking long road trips. But it is still an important part of the equation.
I also wonder about cold weather in the northern states and how the battery can decrease in these temps. Hybrid technology is really what needs to be adopted to all cars being produced now. Yes it still requires gas, but you can get amazing miles per gallon even on larger cars and trucks. An all electric car is great and probably works for most people, but it will not be a one size fits all solution to car production.
 

Wally

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I also wonder about cold weather in the northern states and how the battery can decrease in these temps. Hybrid technology is really what needs to be adopted to all cars being produced now. Yes it still requires gas, but you can get amazing miles per gallon even on larger cars and trucks. An all electric car is great and probably works for most people, but it will not be a one size fits all solution to car production.
I agree, I never understood why they weren't making plug in hybrid trucks. I know its because they make more money pushing the traditional trucks. For years I thought it would be great.

Some Texans use 2021 Ford F-150 hybrid pickup trucks to power homes amid winter storm
 
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