Rickert advice for Oturu: "Definitely don’t listen to the people who say you should stay in school."

BleedGopher

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per Shooter:

Daniel Oturu, the 6-foot-10 Gopher from Woodbury, has decided to leave the program after his sophomore season for June’s NBA draft.

Seventeen years ago, another 6-10 Gopher, Rick Rickert from Duluth, decided to do the same after his sophomore season.

Might Rickert have some advice for Oturu?

“Surround yourself with a good group of people who have your best interests at heart and people who know what’s going on,” Rickert said. “Definitely don’t listen to the people who say you should stay in school. Those are the people who maybe don’t have your best interests at heart because they selfishly want you to stay for the program or whatever. Because nowadays, you do have the ability to go back.”

Rickert, now 37, was the second-round draft pick of the Timberwolves in 2003. He didn’t make the team, but enjoyed a splendid 15-year professional career in Japan, Europe, New Zealand and Puerto Rico.

The former Minnesota Mr. Basketball out of Duluth East and the Big Ten freshman of the year with the Gophers eventually earned his college degree online from Arizona State in nutrition/communications while still playing.

Today, Rickert has a successful sales position with the national insurance Healthcare Solutions Team (rickrickert.com).

““I’m having a blast,” he said.

The same was true of his pro playing career.

”The good thing is I ended healthy,” he said. “I was very fortunate to play as long as I did, so I’m pretty happy about that.”

Rickert resides in Coeur D’Alene, Idaho. Wife Cici was a Gophers tennis standout. They have two daughters, aspiring tennis player Pepper (10) and one-year-old Coco.

Rickert was the No. 55 overall pick in the 2003 NBA draft. The No. 1 pick was LeBron James.

”LeBron’s arguably the greatest of all time, so that’s not too bad,” Rickert said.

Duluth East retired Rickert’s No. 44 jersey a year ago.


Go Gophers!!
 

upnorthkid

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honestly, I don't really imagine anyone encouraging their potential payday to stay in school and put off earning money. really bizarre quote. Unless he for some reason thinks Dan is getting on Gopherhole seeing the people who express they hope he stays. Wouldn't imagine anyone close to him that is looking out for themselves to want to have him stay in school.
 

builtbadgers

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per Shooter:

Daniel Oturu, the 6-foot-10 Gopher from Woodbury, has decided to leave the program after his sophomore season for June’s NBA draft.

Seventeen years ago, another 6-10 Gopher, Rick Rickert from Duluth, decided to do the same after his sophomore season.

Might Rickert have some advice for Oturu?

“Surround yourself with a good group of people who have your best interests at heart and people who know what’s going on,” Rickert said. “Definitely don’t listen to the people who say you should stay in school. Those are the people who maybe don’t have your best interests at heart because they selfishly want you to stay for the program or whatever. Because nowadays, you do have the ability to go back.”

Rickert, now 37, was the second-round draft pick of the Timberwolves in 2003. He didn’t make the team, but enjoyed a splendid 15-year professional career in Japan, Europe, New Zealand and Puerto Rico.

The former Minnesota Mr. Basketball out of Duluth East and the Big Ten freshman of the year with the Gophers eventually earned his college degree online from Arizona State in nutrition/communications while still playing.

Today, Rickert has a successful sales position with the national insurance Healthcare Solutions Team (rickrickert.com).

““I’m having a blast,” he said.

The same was true of his pro playing career.

”The good thing is I ended healthy,” he said. “I was very fortunate to play as long as I did, so I’m pretty happy about that.”

Rickert resides in Coeur D’Alene, Idaho. Wife Cici was a Gophers tennis standout. They have two daughters, aspiring tennis player Pepper (10) and one-year-old Coco.

Rickert was the No. 55 overall pick in the 2003 NBA draft. The No. 1 pick was LeBron James.

”LeBron’s arguably the greatest of all time, so that’s not too bad,” Rickert said.

Duluth East retired Rickert’s No. 44 jersey a year ago.


Go Gophers!!
Different for every player. I know a player that stayed a 5th year. Despite a unprecedented season it moved him down in the draft because of his age. But getting his Masters in a highly respected grad school was a priority. He then went in the 2nd round, became rookie of the year, now has a twenty million a year salary in the NBA and establishes fresh water wells to countries in Africa. I do think most kids should go when they will be drafted but respect those that even decide playing abroad for money is chasing their dream.
 

Holy Man

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Rickert was one of the early classic examples of a player who lost ground after his freshman year. If he would have declared after freshman year, he likely would have been a first rounder with guaranteed money. His choice to stay probably cost him money, but the fact that he never sniffed any time in the NBA suggests he didn't have what it took to make it, though. As I recall, the Wolves drafting him seemed more like a charity outreach than a belief that he would actually make it.

I'm glad he's doing well. He was a good player, in high demand, who chose to stay home and played for money for fifteen years. That's a pretty good life. He really should move back to Minnesota and get involved with the program, though.:)
 

Block M

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Rickert was one of the early classic examples of a player who lost ground after his freshman year. If he would have declared after freshman year, he likely would have been a first rounder with guaranteed money. His choice to stay probably cost him money, but the fact that he never sniffed any time in the NBA suggests he didn't have what it took to make it, though. As I recall, the Wolves drafting him seemed more like a charity outreach than a belief that he would actually make it.

I'm glad he's doing well. He was a good player, in high demand, who chose to stay home and played for money for fifteen years. That's a pretty good life. He really should move back to Minnesota and get involved with the program, though.:)
Guaranteed for a year or two and then cut and flamed out. Either you can play or you can't. Rickert was not a victim of anything. Glad he had a nice overseas career and is doing well post basketball.
 

builtbadgers

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He never understood the level of work required to make it and stay in the league.
 

coolhandgopher

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Rickert was one of the early classic examples of a player who lost ground after his freshman year. If he would have declared after freshman year, he likely would have been a first rounder with guaranteed money. His choice to stay probably cost him money, but the fact that he never sniffed any time in the NBA suggests he didn't have what it took to make it, though. As I recall, the Wolves drafting him seemed more like a charity outreach than a belief that he would actually make it.

I'm glad he's doing well. He was a good player, in high demand, who chose to stay home and played for money for fifteen years. That's a pretty good life. He really should move back to Minnesota and get involved with the program, though.:)
Hard to believe that much time has passed (apropos of nothing, I was checking out Dusty Rychart's wikipedia page the other day and it indicates he's been playing professionally in Australia for nearly 20 years and hasn't yet officially retired at age 41-a pretty damn good life for a former walk-on), but you hit it on the head with Rickert-his best chance at NBA riches was after his freshman year. His sophomore year was such a tough year for him and the team; I remember him getting worked by Alando Tucker possession after possession on the block and realizing at that time he wasn't going to be able to hang in the NBA.
 

Bob_Loblaw

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He never understood the level of work required to make it and stay in the league.
Rickert would have been an interesting prospect today. He was a stretch 4 before anyone used stretch 4s. I think Rickert probably has a longer career today than he did 15 years ago.
 

builtbadgers

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Rickert would have been an interesting prospect today. He was a stretch 4 before anyone used stretch 4s. I think Rickert probably has a longer career today than he did 15 years ago.
Dirk, Larry played stretch 4. Rick could not defend the post, horrible technique, too slow on the perimeter, not efficient offensively. Just not hard enough as a worker to improve.
 

Bob_Loblaw

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Dirk, Larry played stretch 4. Rick could not defend the post, horrible technique, too slow on the perimeter, not efficient offensively. Just not hard enough as a worker to improve.
Yeah, he wasn't as good as Larry or Dirk. Up until the last 6 years, you could be kind of slug and play in the NBA if you were 7'0" and could rebound. Some of those guys actually made a lot of money. Now, in the NBA, you can be a pretty lousy player if you are close to 7'0" and you can shoot. Many of these guys are lousy defenders (or else they would be stars).

As far as being an efficient scorer, Rickert was a pretty efficient scorer in college. He shot a decent percentage while mixing in threes and free throws. He was about as efficient of a scorer as like Marcus Carr.

As far as being slow on the perimeter - - yes, of course and most of the niche stretch 4's are very slow on the perimeter. The ones that aren't are super stars. If you are quick, can shoot, and you're 6'10"+, you're a super star in the NBA. Again, I was talking about as like a niche player (think more like a poor man's Mirotic or Bjelica and less NBA super stars).

But yes, you're right, Rick Rickert was not as good at basketball as Larry Bird or Dirk.

As far as him willing to work - - I mean, I guess. He also seems pretty limited athletically. I can't really speak for his work ethic. He did play professional basketball, all over the world, for over 20 years. That doesn't wreak of someone who doesn't work hard at a particular craft. But maybe he coasted for two decades.
 

builtbadgers

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Yeah, he wasn't as good as Larry or Dirk. Up until the last 6 years, you could be kind of slug and play in the NBA if you were 7'0" and could rebound. Some of those guys actually made a lot of money. Now, in the NBA, you can be a pretty lousy player if you are close to 7'0" and you can shoot. Many of these guys are lousy defenders (or else they would be stars).

As far as being an efficient scorer, Rickert was a pretty efficient scorer in college. He shot a decent percentage while mixing in threes and free throws. He was about as efficient of a scorer as like Marcus Carr.

As far as being slow on the perimeter - - yes, of course and most of the niche stretch 4's are very slow on the perimeter. The ones that aren't are super stars. If you are quick, can shoot, and you're 6'10"+, you're a super star in the NBA. Again, I was talking about as like a niche player (think more like a poor man's Mirotic or Bjelica and less NBA super stars).

But yes, you're right, Rick Rickert was not as good at basketball as Larry Bird or Dirk.

As far as him willing to work - - I mean, I guess. He also seems pretty limited athletically. I can't really speak for his work ethic. He did play professional basketball, all over the world, for over 20 years. That doesn't wreak of someone who doesn't work hard at a particular craft. But maybe he coasted for two decades.
He coasted for 3 critical years from 17-20, not improving. Could not guard his shadow, that is lazy.
 

Bad Gopher

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Rick was all skill, low on athleticism, which doesn't get you into the NBA. And weirdly, his skills seemed to decline after a certain point. His free throw percentage peaked as a HS junior and declined each of the next three years (not sure about his pro years).
 

manderson1984

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Rick was all skill, low on athleticism, which doesn't get you into the NBA. And weirdly, his skills seemed to decline after a certain point. His free throw percentage peaked as a HS junior and declined each of the next three years (not sure about his pro years).
I'd disagree on the athleticism part to a point. He dunked on us two handed off a rebound with one step in front of the free throw line. He also ran the point against multiple press schemes in high school too. Badger is right about the 17-20 years. He was very arrogant and coasted and was lazy. The drop in FT shooting makes perfect sense as an example.
 

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Why would Rickert do that? If he hadn't told Oturu to leave, we would have a better team next year.
 

short ornery norwegian

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Rickert's greatest claim to fame is that Kevin Garnett punched him during a pickup game. Of course, Rickert claims that KG sucker-punched him because Rickert was playing too well and showing up KG.

If you buy that, I have a bridge you may be interested in.
 

MRJ

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It depends on the prospect imo.

Oturu is a far better prospect than Rickert ever was.

In reality, Rickert was a one-dimensional, 6-10 perimeter shooter who couldn't guard or play in the post.

Oturu has a more developed post game, blocks shots on defense and can hit open jumpers as well. As a result, he's considered a top-20 pick. The Timberwolves threw Rickert a bone with his draft pick and he wasn't good enough to capitalize on it.

In Oturu's case, it makes complete sense to go. I was never sure what Rickert thought was going to happen with the NBA. He was never going to make it there, so his advice in regards to playing in the NBA doesn't mean much imo.

Better to get that advice from Coffey. Maybe he has, maybe he hasn't.

But I don't see the appeal of asking Rickert about the NBA draft.
 

UpAndUnder43

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man. Combining Shooter with unsolicited advice is quite a 1-2.
 

Frank Grimey Grimes

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Different for every player. I know a player that stayed a 5th year. Despite a unprecedented season it moved him down in the draft because of his age. But getting his Masters in a highly respected grad school was a priority. He then went in the 2nd round, became rookie of the year, now has a twenty million a year salary in the NBA and establishes fresh water wells to countries in Africa. I do think most kids should go when they will be drafted but respect those that even decide playing abroad for money is chasing their dream.
You can say Malcolm Brogdon. We won't all rip you for referencing Virgina. I believe his father and brother are lawyers so obviously education is important in that family. I'd say Brogdon is very much in the minority though, very very few players would follow in his path. Even if it has worked out well.
 

builtbadgers

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Joe Harris will do the same. Devon Hall will likely not stick in the NBA but he got his Masters. It is rare but more common there because they target those kinds of kids. Thanks for your post. It will not bother me in the least if some are bothered by the UVA thing, i block people that do not have a interest in a wider view of the sport or a observation in excellence or even more so if all they have are insults. I can not read them, they are blocked. The Brogdon example is similar to the Hoffarber experience here.
 

jovs

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It depends on the prospect imo.

Oturu is a far better prospect than Rickert ever was.

In reality, Rickert was a one-dimensional, 6-10 perimeter shooter who couldn't guard or play in the post.

Oturu has a more developed post game, blocks shots on defense and can hit open jumpers as well. As a result, he's considered a top-20 pick. The Timberwolves threw Rickert a bone with his draft pick and he wasn't good enough to capitalize on it.

In Oturu's case, it makes complete sense to go. I was never sure what Rickert thought was going to happen with the NBA. He was never going to make it there, so his advice in regards to playing in the NBA doesn't mean much imo.

Better to get that advice from Coffey. Maybe he has, maybe he hasn't.

But I don't see the appeal of asking Rickert about the NBA draft.
If Oturu had Rickert's post game at this point he would be a top 3 pick, at the collegiate level Rickert dominated in the post but he did not overpower people or do it with his athleticism. He lacked the basic athleticism to compete at the NBA level, he wasn't quick enough or physical enough for the NBA, nor was he great rebounder, this did not translate into being a good or even decent defender. Oturu has the physical characteristics and potential that Rickert never had. His game is really developing fast, even a second round draft pick wouldn't necessarily be a terrible thing for Oturu. it would cost him big bucks in the short term but if he continues to develop he can have a very successful NBA career.

I'm sure Rickert has heard all his life that leaving early was the worst decision he has ever made but maybe from his perspective it was his best decision and this is the point he was trying to convey.
 

manderson1984

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If Oturu had Rickert's post game at this point he would be a top 3 pick, at the collegiate level Rickert dominated in the post but he did not overpower people or do it with his athleticism. He lacked the basic athleticism to compete at the NBA level, he wasn't quick enough or physical enough for the NBA, nor was he great rebounder, this did not translate into being a good or even decent defender. Oturu has the physical characteristics and potential that Rickert never had. His game is really developing fast, even a second round draft pick wouldn't necessarily be a terrible thing for Oturu. it would cost him big bucks in the short term but if he continues to develop he can have a very successful NBA career.

I'm sure Rickert has heard all his life that leaving early was the worst decision he has ever made but maybe from his perspective it was his best decision and this is the point he was trying to convey.
Rickert was plenty athletic and had ability. He was lazy and didn't lift/work out and develop it like he should of. Had he done that, who knows where he could've been. Daniel on the other hand works incredibly hard and is also a good teammate to boot. Him and Rickert should never be compared based on that alone.

Rickerts heard the worst decision he made was to stay his sophomore year. That's why he's saying what he's saying because his flaws continued to be found. He's lucky McHale bailed him out.
 

Bob_Loblaw

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Joe Harris will do the same. Devon Hall will likely not stick in the NBA but he got his Masters. It is rare but more common there because they target those kinds of kids. Thanks for your post. It will not bother me in the least if some are bothered by the UVA thing, i block people that do not have a interest in a wider view of the sport or a observation in excellence or even more so if all they have are insults. I can not read them, they are blocked. The Brogdon example is similar to the Hoffarber experience here.
I love Hoff but he wasn't playing in the NBA.

Brogdon's story is super interesting to me. It also shows you how thin the line is between having a really successful NBA career and being a career back up. Brogdon's athletic ability and production were grossly undervalued because NBA analytics departments were not properly adjusting pace of play into their models at his point. I read a fascinating article predraft about a handful of prospects ranked higher than Brogdon (Kris Dunn and a couple others) were considerably less productive when adjusting for pace.

Then when he gets to Milwaukee, he only starts seeing the court because of injuries to Middleton and another wing, that caused Milwaukee to trade their third string PG (Michael Carter-Williams) for a wing. Then the backup PG (Deladova) gets hurt. I'm not taking any thing away from Brogdon, professional basketball is just interesting like that. The margin between 15th player on the bench and 6th man can be really thin. We are seeing the same thing with Jordan McLaughlin on the Wolves.
 

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Rickert's greatest claim to fame is that Kevin Garnett punched him during a pickup game. Of course, Rickert claims that KG sucker-punched him because Rickert was playing too well and showing up KG.

If you buy that, I have a bridge you may be interested in.
From everything I have heard, read and believe....I'd say that Rickert is telling the truth for the most part. KG did similar things to more than a few players over the years. KG believed in certain things and one of them was that rookies should shut up and play. Rickert hit a jumper and was probably feeling pretty good about himself and Wham! I loved KG but he was not a guy who always lived what he preached.
 

MRJ

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If Oturu had Rickert's post game at this point he would be a top 3 pick, at the collegiate level Rickert dominated in the post but he did not overpower people or do it with his athleticism. He lacked the basic athleticism to compete at the NBA level, he wasn't quick enough or physical enough for the NBA, nor was he great rebounder, this did not translate into being a good or even decent defender. Oturu has the physical characteristics and potential that Rickert never had. His game is really developing fast, even a second round draft pick wouldn't necessarily be a terrible thing for Oturu. it would cost him big bucks in the short term but if he continues to develop he can have a very successful NBA career.

I'm sure Rickert has heard all his life that leaving early was the worst decision he has ever made but maybe from his perspective it was his best decision and this is the point he was trying to convey.
While Rickert's footwork may have been better, he had no intention of using his size in the middle because he was so skinny and noticeably lacked strength. It was exposed time and again in his college career, which led to a lot of 18-foot-plus jumpers as his college career progressed. He was therefore exposed in college and would have gotten absolutely killed in the pros in the post.

If Rickert had been as good in the post as you suggest, he wouldn't have drifted outside so much and would have been a lock for a top-15 pick because he was a reliable jumper shooter. As it was, nobody in the NBA really wanted him. He just wanted the NBA.

The fact that Oturu is bigger and stronger, can reliably go inside due to his size and athleticism, can stick a jumper and also plays defense leaves him a far better prospect that Rickert ever was.
 

Roland Brooks

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Wow defensive! Ok Dr. Built Naismith. I forgot you invented the game.

Ridiculous analogy you are better than that. Ask Krabbenhoft if Nate had a great year. Potter was way more productive and a big reason they played well.

Yes Reuvers is a poor man’s Rick Rickert. I guess using your criteria my guy Bronson Koenig is not comparable to Russ Smith because Russ won it and Bronson did not?? Ok....
 
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