Ohio State Shuts Down Workouts Due To COVID

short ornery norwegian

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As far as sports are concerned, the issue is not deaths - the issue is that positive cases force athletes to quarantine until they test negative.

If the number of positive cases remains fairly high, that means that either teams exist in a bubble - extremely hard to do in a college or HS setting - or accept that players will be testing positive during the season.

We could see constant disruptions of practice and players being unavailable for games. how much of that do you want to live with just to get the games in? want to see a Gopher game if Morgan and Bateman test positive on Friday and can't play?

that is the issue for sports - not deaths, but disruptions.

as for HS's, you are only eligible for so many semesters starting with your FR year. the clock is running whether there is a season or not, so if there is no FB season, seniors just lose that season. can't get it back. As for open enrolling out of state, it would depend on the other state's eligibility rules. entire family would probably have to move for a senior to be immediately eligible.
 

GoldenRodents

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You pretty much repeat this same thing over and over.

So let’s try something different: why do you think that almost no one who makes the decisions or is consulted as an expert, agrees with your viewpoint?
...because our society is afflicted with a safety fetish that is intensively dangerous for long term survival. The greatest risk is to take no risks at all.
 

MplsGopher

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...because our society is afflicted with a safety fetish that is intensively dangerous for long term survival. The greatest risk is to take no risks at all.
This makes no sense, logically or evolutionarily. Can you please try to elaborate?

That's like a dad telling his 16 year old son "you expect to make something of yourself if you don't drive the wrong way on the freeway from time to time?!?! Take some risks!!"
 

Roland Brooks

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The funny thing is these schools invited athletes back to campus knowing full well there would be positive test. How couldn’t there be?
 

#2Gopher

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Clearly uncharted territory here. No matter what decisions are made, some people are going to get mad or make a mockery of things. I'm glad I won't be on the receiving end of all those idiotic emails and phone calls.
 

Mulligan

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Clearly uncharted territory here. No matter what decisions are made, some people are going to get mad or make a mockery of things. I'm glad I won't be on the receiving end of all those idiotic emails and phone calls.
You can always monitor idiots on GH.
 

GopherOhana

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Add Maryland to this. Suspended voluntary workouts after several positive cases
 

GoldenRodents

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This makes no sense, logically or evolutionarily. Can you please try to elaborate?
Sure, the ability to assess short and long term risk is a key to success.

Evolutionarily, females are risk-averse, being biologically/psychologically optimized for the mother/infant relationship. Males are the risk takers, since they are in competition for the privilege of fathering children. In the evolutionary scheme men are success-objects, and they are more than willing to take risks in order to achieve success. The men who don't take risks typically don't get the girl. The guy who wants to get the girl doesn't take stupid risks, he takes calculated risks. He must take some risks if he wants to get the high status female. How about you @MplsGopher, do you take calculated risks?
 

60's Guy

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Doesn't shutting down summer workouts signal no season? Very unlikely anything changes by August when you either keep going to be ready for games or shut it down. Spring seems to make the most sense to me.
GoldenRodents: When it comes to risk taking schools are pretty conservative.

SON: As far as disruptions...that's part of sports. Yes, this would be extreme but there are 120 guys.
The answer to that is money...how critical is it that there is football from a revenue standpoint. Thinking TV. Again, spring with the hope of a vaccine seems most likely to me for football.
 

PitinoFan

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Doesn't shutting down summer workouts signal no season? Very unlikely anything changes by August when you either keep going to be ready for games or shut it down. Spring seems to make the most sense to me.
GoldenRodents: When it comes to risk taking schools are pretty conservative.

SON: As far as disruptions...that's part of sports. Yes, this would be extreme but there are 120 guys.
The answer to that is money...how critical is it that there is football from a revenue standpoint. Thinking TV. Again, spring with the hope of a vaccine seems most likely to me for football.
The main concern is two seasons too close together, and lack of recovery time. What about the NFL draft? Would they move it? Would there still be a combine? Would prospects have time to prepare and train? I’ll bet many players would skip a Spring season.
 

Some guy

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The main concern is two seasons too close together, and lack of recovery time. What about the NFL draft? Would they move it? Would there still be a combine? Would prospects have time to prepare and train? I’ll bet many players would skip a Spring season.
I’m sure there would be some...but believe it or not college football all performance matters a lot more to nfl GMs and coaches than combine does
 

60's Guy

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PitinoFan...You could be right but you are assuming an NFL season. That's iffy too.
I don't know the financial implications...if those are manageable moving to spring...they will move to spring imo
Going to be bumps in the road no matter how they move forward. Less liability is possible waiting until the spring. The possibility of fans is another carrot.
 

PitinoFan

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PitinoFan...You could be right but you are assuming an NFL season. That's iffy too.
I don't know the financial implications...if those are manageable moving to spring...they will move to spring imo
Going to be bumps in the road no matter how they move forward. Less liability is possible waiting until the spring. The possibility of fans is another carrot.
I’d be fine with it. Just last week, Urban Meyer said “no chance” they have a Spring season. Of course, he could be wrong.
 

MplsGopher

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I'll restate my vote against spring football, NFL, college, and/or high school.

Life will go on, if we had to cancel one year of football. People worried about a few (tens, even hundreds of) millions of dollars. Doesn't amount to a hill of beans in the big picture.

You write it off, for what it was. And you move on and start over again in 2021.
 

Some guy

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I'll restate my vote against spring football, NFL, college, and/or high school.

Life will go on, if we had to cancel one year of football. People worried about a few (tens, even hundreds of) millions of dollars. Doesn't amount to a hill of beans in the big picture.

You write it off, for what it was. And you move on and start over again in 2021.
I don’t think spring season is a viable option in the Midwest except for the NFL
 

2nd Degree Gopher

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I don’t think spring season is a viable option in the Midwest except for the NFL
I disagree. While it's certainly not optimal, most Big Ten schools have indoor facilities for practice and could probably swing a spring season if it was the difference between playing and not. The average high temp in Minneapolis in February is in the 20s and that increases to the 40s in March. There would need to be arrangements made for field level heating (thank goodness we have our heating coils!) and some games might get postponed if there is a particularly cold snap, but it could be done. There are tens of millions of dollars at stake for the programs in the conference, so I think they'd try it as a last resort. There might not be spectators allowed, but the games (and resulting TV revenue) could go on.
 

Some guy

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I disagree. While it's certainly not optimal, most Big Ten schools have indoor facilities for practice and could probably swing a spring season if it was the difference between playing and not. The average high temp in Minneapolis in February is in the 20s and that increases to the 40s in March. There would need to be arrangements made for field level heating (thank goodness we have our heating coils!) and some games might get postponed if there is a particularly cold snap, but it could be done. There are tens of millions of dollars at stake for the programs in the conference, so I think they'd try it as a last resort. There might not be spectators allowed, but the games (and resulting TV revenue) could go on.
They can’t even make Camp Randall a good playing surface at the end of November.

it’s going to sit there all winter and be ready to be a safe playing surface in late February?


maybe you could do a spring season if by spring you mean start in early April and get done in late June.

February and March wouldn’t work. Especially for high schools and small colleges in the upper Midwest
 

2nd Degree Gopher

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They can’t even make Camp Randall a good playing surface at the end of November.

it’s going to sit there all winter and be ready to be a safe playing surface in late February?


maybe you could do a spring season if by spring you mean start in early April and get done in late June.

February and March wouldn’t work. Especially for high schools and small colleges in the upper Midwest
First, let me agree that Camp Randall is a dump. Second, I am not predicting that this will happen or saying that it would be easy, just stating the position that it could be done. Third, I never suggested that it would be feasible for small colleges or high schools to do this, my focus is on the Big Ten. For those schools, and any other institutions with that much money at stake, there would be ways to try to make it happen if the alternative is nothing at all. As an example, practice could start in February with games in March-May. Schools generally already have spring practice at some point in March, so we are talking about starting 4-6 weeks earlier at most places. Fields can be covered and heated, heated benches and portable heaters can be utilized. Failing that, there are domed stadiums in Minneapolis, Indianapolis and Detroit that could be utilized if necessary.
 
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MplsGopher

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They tried to “cover and heat” the rock hard frozen field at TCF when the Vikings had to switch over suddenly. It didn't work.

Only way you can do it is with heating coils (Coyles) installed under the surface.
 

2nd Degree Gopher

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They tried to “cover and heat” the rock hard frozen field at TCF when the Vikings had to switch over suddenly. It didn't work.

Only way you can do it is with heating coils (Coyles) installed under the surface.
It didn’t work when they had to remove all the snow off the field and try to get it ready to play in a few days. That doesn’t mean it can’t be done with weeks or even months to prepare.
 

oak_street1981

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The problem was the Title IX tribunal ordered the coyles removed and sent to the Maturi rowing boathouse, so the white man Brett Favre had to pay price at TCF that cold night, probably due.to his "privileged" background.

All the insanity is coming together in 2020.
 

Word

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First, let me agree that Camp Randall is a dump. Second, I am not predicting that this will happen or saying that it would be easy, just stating the position that it could be done. Third, I never suggested that it would be feasible for small colleges or high schools to do this, my focus is on the Big Ten. For those schools, and any other institutions with that much money at stake, there would be ways to try to make it happen if the alternative is nothing at all. As an example, practice could start in February with games in March-May. Schools generally already have spring practice at some point in March, so we are talking about starting 4-6 weeks earlier at most places. Fields can be covered and heated, heated benches and portable heaters can be utilized. Failing that, there are domed stadiums in Minneapolis, Indianapolis and Detroit that could be utilized if necessary.
The Big Ten could use those dome stadiums but I am sure the teams from out of town wouldn't be thrilled. If it was a last resort, maybe?
 

MplsGopher

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It didn’t work when they had to remove all the snow off the field and try to get it ready to play in a few days. That doesn’t mean it can’t be done with weeks or even months to prepare.
True. Simply saying, it's far less effective to cover with a tarp and blow hot air under the tarp, and expect that to seep into the ground, as opposed to heating coils (Coyles).
 

2nd Degree Gopher

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The Big Ten could use those dome stadiums but I am sure the teams from out of town wouldn't be thrilled. If it was a last resort, maybe?
Absolutely, all of this would be a last resort to try to preserve some semblance of a season and save some portion of the television and sponsorship revenue.
 
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