National Vote by Mail - Do You Now Support It

MennoSota

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The difference between mail-in voting and absentee voting as shared by KARE 11.

There’s been some national debate over mail-in ballots and absentee ballots, and whether the terms are interchangeable or have different meanings.
All ballots that are sent through the mail share a few things in common: You have to be a registered voter to get one, you have to sign the ballot yourself and it has to be sent via the United States Postal Service.

President Trump has spoken out against mail-in ballots calling them a “formula for rigging an election.” But he’s also said that absentee ballots “are fine.” When asked for clarification on the difference, his administration has said that absentee ballots have to be requested through a different process.
So what exactly is the difference between the two ballots?

THE QUESTION:
What is the difference between mail-in ballots and absentee ballots?

THE ANSWER:
Yes, they are different, but only in one way.
Absentee ballots have to be requested by the voter to be mailed out. Mail-in ballots typically refer to states where the ballots are sent to all registered voters whether they requested one or not.

WHAT WE FOUND:
The National Conference of State Legislatures divides ballots that are sent by the mail into two categories: “Absentee” and “All-Mail Voting.”

Absentee ballots have to be requested along with a reason for voting absentee.
The following 29 states and Washington, D.C., let any registered voter request an absentee ballot for any reason: Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
Florida does require that registered voters request a ballot, but the state legally changed the name in 2016 from “absentee” to “vote-by-mail.”

In 16 states, you must have a reason or “excuse” to request and receive an absentee ballot. Qualifying reasons vary from state to state, but voters typically have to show why they cannot physically be at the polling location, like military service or out-of-state school.
So...if mail-in ballots just get sent out to anyone with an address regardless of whether they asked for it or not, how likely is it that the person, for whom that ballot was sent, is the actual person that filled out the ballot? How likely is it that many ballots will be sent to non-citizens who could then vote? How easy would it be for one person in the family to take all the ballots and ensure that their opinion is the vote of all people in the family? Do you see the potential problems?
 

howeda7

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So...if mail-in ballots just get sent out to anyone with an address regardless of whether they asked for it or not, how likely is it that the person, for whom that ballot was sent, is the actual person that filled out the ballot? How likely is it that many ballots will be sent to non-citizens who could then vote? How easy would it be for one person in the family to take all the ballots and ensure that their opinion is the vote of all people in the family? Do you see the potential problems?
It wouldn't be easy at all. You have to be registered to vote. You have to sign the ballot.

Will a "non-citizen" risk committing voter fraud and going to jail to cast one meaningless vote? Probably not. If they do, their ballot will be thrown out because they weren't registered.

Will your Commie brother-in-law take everyone's ballots and fill them out? Probably not. If he does, all of them but his will be rejected because the signatures won't match.
 

MennoSota

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It wouldn't be easy at all. You have to be registered to vote. You have to sign the ballot.

Will a "non-citizen" risk committing voter fraud and going to jail to cast one meaningless vote? Probably not. If they do, their ballot will be thrown out because they weren't registered.

Will your Commie brother-in-law take everyone's ballots and fill them out? Probably not. If he does, all of them but his will be rejected because the signatures won't match.
In Minnesota, you just have to have a mailing address for two consecutive months and you're registered. That's simple.
Plus, anyone can sign the ballot. No one is going to check each signature on the millions of ballots sent in. Plus, the post office may misplace the ballots for any number of reasons.
Yes, a non-citizen who isn't being checked by any good tracking system, will definitely vote by mail. It's simple and nearly impossible that anyone digs that deep when millions of mail-in votes are being placed.
The potential for fraud is extremely high.
Just a few months back, a neighbor had their mail stolen from their box. Thankfully someone in the block saw the perpetrator and called police. The fact is that mail gets stolen all the time. Yes, your commie buddies have no problems with fraud. They've been perpetrating it for nearly 130 years now.
 

GophersInIowa

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The difference between mail-in voting and absentee voting as shared by KARE 11.

There’s been some national debate over mail-in ballots and absentee ballots, and whether the terms are interchangeable or have different meanings.
All ballots that are sent through the mail share a few things in common: You have to be a registered voter to get one, you have to sign the ballot yourself and it has to be sent via the United States Postal Service.

President Trump has spoken out against mail-in ballots calling them a “formula for rigging an election.” But he’s also said that absentee ballots “are fine.” When asked for clarification on the difference, his administration has said that absentee ballots have to be requested through a different process.
So what exactly is the difference between the two ballots?

THE QUESTION:
What is the difference between mail-in ballots and absentee ballots?

THE ANSWER:
Yes, they are different, but only in one way.
Absentee ballots have to be requested by the voter to be mailed out. Mail-in ballots typically refer to states where the ballots are sent to all registered voters whether they requested one or not.

WHAT WE FOUND:
The National Conference of State Legislatures divides ballots that are sent by the mail into two categories: “Absentee” and “All-Mail Voting.”

Absentee ballots have to be requested along with a reason for voting absentee.
The following 29 states and Washington, D.C., let any registered voter request an absentee ballot for any reason: Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
Florida does require that registered voters request a ballot, but the state legally changed the name in 2016 from “absentee” to “vote-by-mail.”

In 16 states, you must have a reason or “excuse” to request and receive an absentee ballot. Qualifying reasons vary from state to state, but voters typically have to show why they cannot physically be at the polling location, like military service or out-of-state school.
For most states then people who don't want to vote in person should just request absentee. Really the difference is just that the voter has to proactively request it which shouldn't be that hard for most people.
 

MennoSota

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For most states then people who don't want to vote in person should just request absentee. Really the difference is just that the voter has to proactively request it which shouldn't be that hard for most people.
Correct. If a person wants to vote in absentee, make the formal request. But, to just send out ballots, without a request, is a recipe for fraud.
Moreso, if people can go to the grocery store or to a restaurant, they can certainly get to the ballot box. If we have an issue with spreading out voting times, then make election day a holiday so people can go at anytime during the day.
 

KillerGopherFan

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It wouldn't be easy at all. You have to be registered to vote. You have to sign the ballot.

Will a "non-citizen" risk committing voter fraud and going to jail to cast one meaningless vote? Probably not. If they do, their ballot will be thrown out because they weren't registered.

Will your Commie brother-in-law take everyone's ballots and fill them out? Probably not. If he does, all of them but his will be rejected because the signatures won't match.
Democrats want to eliminate signature verification. That’s in their stimulus legislation proposal.

You have to keep changing your story to fit the no limits, no obstacles, no verification of voter identity by Democrats.
 

Livingat45north

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Nope, no problem at all with 200,000 ballots just floating around waiting to be filled in. Welcome to the new Nazi Germany, home of the libs.

 

John Galt

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The postal service just said they lost $2.2 billion during the 2nd quarter and are on-track to lose $20 billion over the next 2 years.

But trust Howie on this one- they’re competent and they’ll eventually get this figured out.
 

Ski U Mah Gopher

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So...if mail-in ballots just get sent out to anyone with an address regardless of whether they asked for it or not, how likely is it that the person, for whom that ballot was sent, is the actual person that filled out the ballot? How likely is it that many ballots will be sent to non-citizens who could then vote? How easy would it be for one person in the family to take all the ballots and ensure that their opinion is the vote of all people in the family? Do you see the potential problems?
1. There is probably either a SSN or DL number attached to each voter number. You have to put one of those on the return envelope.

2. There is a signature on file to match with the signature on the envelope.

Both have to match. At least that how it works in Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, etc.
 

MennoSota

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1. There is probably either a SSN or DL number attached to each voter number. You have to put one of those on the return envelope.

2. There is a signature on file to match with the signature on the envelope.

Both have to match. At least that how it works in Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, etc.
I have all the social security numbers for my family of voters. I could get multiple extra votes for myself. No one is checking signatures. Heck, you don't even need a signature for your credit card transactions anymore.
Just admit, mail in voting is not a secure method of voting.
 

Panthadad2

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I have all the social security numbers for my family of voters. I could get multiple extra votes for myself. No one is checking signatures. Heck, you don't even need a signature for your credit card transactions anymore.
Just admit, mail in voting is not a secure method of voting.
Hey, I could effectively cancel my out-of-state college kids votes. Good idea. :sneaky:
 

KillerGopherFan

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And some Democrats are using every possible angle to make unsecured voting by mail a reality, including eliminating signature verification. If all that is required is the last 4 digits of a SS# to vote, vote harvesting, vote buying, and fraud possibilities increase.

The rate of ballot rejection is already higher than the differences between some elections. Lowering the standard for voter ID verification will decrease ballot rejection and guarantee more fraudulent votes and a loss of election integrity.
 

jamiche

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Nope, no problem at all with 200,000 ballots just floating around waiting to be filled in. Welcome to the new Nazi Germany, home of the libs.

One of the board's shameless fellas making another nazi comparison. The nazi's murdered approximately 19,000,000 people and tortured, imprisoned and enslaved millions more. You make casual comparisons of people with whom you disagree to a group of people who murdered, enslaved, tortured and imprisoned tens and tens of millions of people. You guys have an infectious disease far worse than COVID.
 

justthefacts

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No distinction at all here between various VBM methods

 

howeda7

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Uh oh! Republicans worst nightmare!

No lines at the polls, no trouble as mail-in ballots dominate primary


"After flood of mail-in ballots, Minnesota voters trickle to the polls
The historic crush of absentee ballots cast by mail before Election Day meant a dramatic dip in in-person participation statewide."
And the real reason they're freaking out. Turnout in this mostly mail-in primary in MN:

US Senate Primary

Dems: 526K votes total
Reps: 228K votes total
 

tikited

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Tiny goes back a ways on this board and I have to be honest, I don't think this poster remotely resembles them but what do I know. My recollection of the old tiny was quite a bit older, a little more pompous and proper and condescending.
I still could have sworn that Tiny turned into Mplsgopher.
 

Bad Gopher

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The pattern is the same. Not long ago the fascists here were denying there was any connection between the USPS troubles and the upcoming election. Now it's out in the open, and they'll be defending it.
 

USAF

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You want to vote by mail? I'll show you!

I know it's cliche, but this is yet another statement (confirmed by actions) that would lead every news show for a month if it were happening under literally any other President.

JHFC. Another step or three into full fledged banana republicanism.

We're officially a third world dictatorship.
 
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