National Council of Churches

MennoSota

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I found this comment from the NCC in 1999.

34. As Christians we recognize that Jesus is not central to other religious traditions. For men and women in other communities, the mystery of God takes many forms. Observing this, we are not led to deny the centrality of Christ for our faith, but to contemplate more deeply the meaning of St. Paul’s affirmation: "Ever since the creation of the world, (God’s) eternal power and divine nature, invisible though they are, have been understood and seen through the things [God] has made" (Romans 1:20). Christians disagree on the nature and extent of such "natural revelation" and its relation to salvation. No matter what our view on this may be, we can be open to the insights of others.

35. We recognize that scripture speaks with many voices about relationship with men and women of other religious traditions. We need to devote further attention to issues of interpreting scriptural teaching. But as to our Christian discipleship, we can only live by the clear obligation of the Gospel. When Jesus was asked, "What must I do to inherit eternal life?" he, referring to his Jewish tradition, answered, "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself" (Luke 10:25-27). Love of God and love of neighbors cannot be separated. We rejoice in our common conviction that Jesus calls us to ministries of reconciliation.


I believe this collaborates my contention that the NCC believes there are many pathways to God via various avatars. I do understand and accept that others may not view this the same way I do.
 

RememberMurray

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I found this comment from the NCC in 1999.

34. As Christians we recognize that Jesus is not central to other religious traditions. For men and women in other communities, the mystery of God takes many forms. Observing this, we are not led to deny the centrality of Christ for our faith, but to contemplate more deeply the meaning of St. Paul’s affirmation: "Ever since the creation of the world, (God’s) eternal power and divine nature, invisible though they are, have been understood and seen through the things [God] has made" (Romans 1:20). Christians disagree on the nature and extent of such "natural revelation" and its relation to salvation. No matter what our view on this may be, we can be open to the insights of others.

35. We recognize that scripture speaks with many voices about relationship with men and women of other religious traditions. We need to devote further attention to issues of interpreting scriptural teaching. But as to our Christian discipleship, we can only live by the clear obligation of the Gospel. When Jesus was asked, "What must I do to inherit eternal life?" he, referring to his Jewish tradition, answered, "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself" (Luke 10:25-27). Love of God and love of neighbors cannot be separated. We rejoice in our common conviction that Jesus calls us to ministries of reconciliation.


I believe this collaborates my contention that the NCC believes there are many pathways to God via various avatars. I do understand and accept that others may not view this the same way I do.
Sooooooo.... does God still view homosexuality as "an abomination"? And... what about shellfish? Good to go, or not so much?
 

RememberMurray

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And... do we stone the non-virgins to death, or marry them, or divorce them, or...?
 

Nokomis

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I found this comment from the NCC in 1999.

34. As Christians we recognize that Jesus is not central to other religious traditions. For men and women in other communities, the mystery of God takes many forms. Observing this, we are not led to deny the centrality of Christ for our faith, but to contemplate more deeply the meaning of St. Paul’s affirmation: "Ever since the creation of the world, (God’s) eternal power and divine nature, invisible though they are, have been understood and seen through the things [God] has made" (Romans 1:20). Christians disagree on the nature and extent of such "natural revelation" and its relation to salvation. No matter what our view on this may be, we can be open to the insights of others.

35. We recognize that scripture speaks with many voices about relationship with men and women of other religious traditions. We need to devote further attention to issues of interpreting scriptural teaching. But as to our Christian discipleship, we can only live by the clear obligation of the Gospel. When Jesus was asked, "What must I do to inherit eternal life?" he, referring to his Jewish tradition, answered, "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself" (Luke 10:25-27). Love of God and love of neighbors cannot be separated. We rejoice in our common conviction that Jesus calls us to ministries of reconciliation.


I believe this collaborates my contention that the NCC believes there are many pathways to God via various avatars. I do understand and accept that others may not view this the same way I do.
Ok, but that's a LONG way from "atheists posing as church leaders" and "they deny what Jesus says about himself".
 

MennoSota

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Sooooooo.... does God still view homosexuality as "an abomination"? And... what about shellfish? Good to go, or not so much?
Irrelevant to the NCC. When you are done reading the entire Christian Bible, let us know. I am confident you will figure it out.
 

RememberMurray

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Irrelevant to the NCC. When you are done reading the entire Christian Bible, let us know. I am confident you will figure it out.
Damn. You seemed like the go-to guy for the exact, perfect explanation. You seemed very, very confident that you know exactly what God wants.

Now, I guess I'm left to interpret the Bible for myself. Not to be a snowflake, but I feel abandoned.
 

Wally

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Thank God, I don't believe in him.
 

RememberMurray

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Thank God, I don't believe in him.
You're not buying it?

Me neither. I could be persuaded, of course; but since the claims are so extraordinary, it would take an extraordinary amount of evidence to convince me. Certainly more evidence than one book — and it's a book that is often vague, contradictory and cryptic, written over the course of many years by many authors, during the Bronze Age.
 

Wally

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You're not buying it?

Me neither. I could be persuaded, of course; but since the claims are so extraordinary, it would take an extraordinary amount of evidence to convince me. Certainly more evidence than one book — and it's a book that is often vague, contradictory and cryptic, written over the course of many years by many authors, during the Bronze Age.
The Bible is the first big government manifesto and the right eats it up.
😎
 

Reserve

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Sure, you could call it a form of universalism but not extreme or literal universalism. I'm Lutheran so subscribe to the three principles of the Reformation. We are saved through Scripture alone, Faith alone, and Grace alone. Some Lutherans believe that it is a Faith in Jesus. Others believe it is the Faith of Jesus. I'm in the latter group. Does that help clarify?
Hmmm. You're speaking of a justification stance.

Let's take, who appear to be, the two atheists posting on this thread: Wally and RememberMurray. They have rejected God their entire lives. They want nothing to do with God. God will not force them to believe in Him. Will they be saved?
 

GoodasGold

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Hmmm. You're speaking of a justification stance.

Let's take, who appear to be, the two atheists posting on this thread: Wally and RememberMurray. They have rejected God their entire lives. They want nothing to do with God. God will not force them to believe in Him. Will they be saved?
They already are.
 

Wally

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Hmmm. You're speaking of a justification stance.

Let's take, who appear to be, the two atheists posting on this thread: Wally and RememberMurray. They have rejected God their entire lives. They want nothing to do with God. God will not force them to believe in Him. Will they be saved?
Heaven comes from being a good person it the here and now, its not some magical reward with 40 virgins for you in the afterlife.
 

RememberMurray

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Hmmm. You're speaking of a justification stance.

Let's take, who appear to be, the two atheists posting on this thread: Wally and RememberMurray. They have rejected God their entire lives. They want nothing to do with God. God will not force them to believe in Him. Will they be saved?
Well, there are billions of people around the world who are not Christians. Hindus, Buddhists, Muslims... what about them?

Then there's the interesting case of the Mormons. Are they saved? Are Jehovah's Witnesses allowed into Heaven?

How about Jewish people?
 

Gopher_In_NYC

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It's part of the Ceremonial Law given to the Jews in Leviticus. Typically, the whole 'shellfish' thing is brought up by those arguing homosexuality.

Are you gay USAF?
He's very happy IMO, but still occasionally smokes a fag.
 

justthefacts

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So you believe then that they would renounce their false gods and confess Jesus Christ as Lord and believe in their hearts that he was resurrected from the dead? That sounds, to me at least, that they would be supportive of rejecting syncretism.

The rest of it? The Bible is fairly specific. One man, one woman for life. Our hearts should go out to those who struggle with sexual sin and it is far more than being gay or trans. Sexual sins have many different shapes, not just those two.
Yes, the Bible is pretty specific

 

WhoFellDownTheGopherHole?

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Yes, the Bible is pretty specific

People are so jacked. The words are the path to the truth, not the truth itself. The truth is known, we are created of it and merely need oft be reminded.

Too many 'literal' fools out there. Everyone fights over semantics while they're busy shitting all over the intention.
 

Reserve

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Heaven comes from being a good person it the here and now, its not some magical reward with 40 virgins for you in the afterlife.
I'm not sure what meaning that has for you. You've stated you don't believe in God. Why would you believe in Heaven or an afterlife?
 

Wally

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I'm not sure what meaning that has for you. You've stated you don't believe in God. Why would you believe in Heaven or an afterlife?
I believe the teachings, some of them, are guide to heaven on earth. Is that shocking?

No I don't believe in ghosts or magical beings, I don't believe you get all your wishes fullfilled when you die or whatever else people believe. I don't believe in heaven in the biblical sense.

I think some of the bible is basically a governmental document and some of it is a guide to a useful and fulfilling life. Just using the brain god gave me....
 

Reserve

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Well, there are billions of people around the world who are not Christians. Hindus, Buddhists, Muslims... what about them?

Then there's the interesting case of the Mormons. Are they saved? Are Jehovah's Witnesses allowed into Heaven?

How about Jewish people?
How about RememberMurray? Will he/she be allowed in Heaven? Excellent question. Let's see what Nokomis says.
 

Reserve

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I believe the teachings, some of them, are guide to heaven on earth. Is that shocking?

No I don't believe in ghosts or magical beings, I don't believe you get all your wishes fullfilled when you die or whatever else people believe. I don't believe in heaven in the biblical sense.

I think some of the bible is basically a governmental document and some of it is a guide to a useful and fulfilling life. Just using the brain god gave me....
The Bible is a book, that we as Christians, believe that God wrote. I'm not sure why you would hold any of what is taught as a 'guide'. I'm no sure why you would credit 'god' or whatever that means to you as giving you a brain.
 

Wally

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The Bible is a book, that we as Christians, believe that God wrote. I'm not sure why you would hold any of what is taught as a 'guide'. I'm no sure why you would credit 'god' or whatever that means to you as giving you a brain.
This popped into my head. Im sick.😏

 

WhoFellDownTheGopherHole?

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The Bible is a book, that we as Christians, believe that God wrote. I'm not sure why you would hold any of what is taught as a 'guide'. I'm no sure why you would credit 'god' or whatever that means to you as giving you a brain.
I'm not sure why you wouldn't credit God for ALL things, least of which being the spectacularly amazing vehicles that we have been blessed with to maneuver us through these human experiences of ours. To question 'why' someone else would give credit to God, is that not self-righteousness? Are you suggesting to deny God his glory? (Didn't you mention something about being Christian?)

:unsure:

I can see that you have some reflection to dig into. I wish you luck, friend. You may have already been forgiven, but you shouldn't stop trying to figure it out!



Why is it that people who claim to be religious always act the least like they are?
(That's a rhetorical question)
 

Nokomis

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Hmmm. You're speaking of a justification stance.

Let's take, who appear to be, the two atheists posting on this thread: Wally and RememberMurray. They have rejected God their entire lives. They want nothing to do with God. God will not force them to believe in Him. Will they be saved?
Yes, or as GaG said, they already are.
 

Nokomis

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The Bible is a book, that we as Christians, believe that God wrote. I'm not sure why you would hold any of what is taught as a 'guide'. I'm no sure why you would credit 'god' or whatever that means to you as giving you a brain.
Well, not quite. I, for one, believe the Bible is the Word of God, recalled by man, written by man, interpreted by man, and translated by man. The Bible you read at home is like...tenth-hand.
 
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