Major Potential Shift In NCAA Transfer Rules

bga1

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I agree. That would get ugly. Imagine what would have happened to the Gophers a year ago after their disastrous season. Sitting a year out is the thing that tends to bind these guys to their commitments.

This would seem to be a situation where the Dukes of the world would skim the cream from the next level down. It makes the job for coaches that much tougher. If you have a discipline problem that player can just plan on moving on if he is talented and doesn't like getting yelled at or benched.

Bad idea.
 

JimmyJamesMD

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I agree. That would get ugly. Imagine what would have happened to the Gophers a year ago after their disastrous season. Sitting a year out is the thing that tends to bind these guys to their commitments.

This would seem to be a situation where the Dukes of the world would skim the cream from the next level down. It makes the job for coaches that much tougher. If you have a discipline problem that player can just plan on moving on if he is talented and doesn't like getting yelled at or benched.

Bad idea.
Exactly. Free agency for kids. It would be chaos
 

HOOP DREAMS

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I'm mixed on this one. Like the article points out, there could be a lot of movement with the big fish in small ponds. Coaches can leave at any time, coaches can pull scholarships (or encourage players they would be better off leaving the program) why shouldn't a student athlete be able to switch schools and play right away? But it would be ugly, delusional kids that think they are better than they are would bounce all over.

Hey, Zach Lofton would have liked the rule.
 

JimmyJamesMD

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I'm mixed on this one. Like the article points out, there could be a lot of movement with the big fish in small ponds. Coaches can leave at any time, coaches can pull scholarships (or encourage players they would be better off leaving the program) why shouldn't a student athlete be able to switch schools and play right away? But it would be ugly, delusional kids that think they are better than they are would bounce all over.

Hey, Zach Lofton would have liked the rule.
I think they should make coaches sit out a year ;-)
 

WarriorGopher

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I think they should make coaches sit out a year ;-)
I've long advocated that players be given more flexibility in transfer and one of the biggest reasons is that coaches can move freely without any (or little) personal limitation.

I see little issue with this, frankly. Let kids make the decision they think is best for them. If they decide to transfer and go somewhere else at the promise of greener pastures, that's their right. If a kid wants to move closer to home for reasons that don't fit the "hardship" exemption that I believe exists now, why wouldn't we want that? The top programs can get any blue chip recruit they want so I'm not as certain as some they would just "pluck" guys out from "lower-level" schools.

Freedom is a two-way street. Let the kids control their basketball and educational futures.
 

WindyCityGopher

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I agree with Bilas on this 100%. They're students, why shouldn't they have the same rights as other students to transfer schools without penalty?
 

Gophers09

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I agree with Bilas on this 100%. They're students, why shouldn't they have the same rights as other students to transfer schools without penalty?
Alternatively stated I guess, playing basketball doesn't really have anything to do with being a student (other than obviously we've linked the 2 and the schools fund and profit/lose on the teams). Every student is free to transfer and be a student.
 

WanderingGopher

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I agree. That would get ugly. Imagine what would have happened to the Gophers a year ago after their disastrous season. Sitting a year out is the thing that tends to bind these guys to their commitments.

This would seem to be a situation where the Dukes of the world would skim the cream from the next level down. It makes the job for coaches that much tougher. If you have a discipline problem that player can just plan on moving on if he is talented and doesn't like getting yelled at or benched.

Bad idea.
^ This.




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Ignatius L Hoops

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It's a good idea and is already the norm in some NCAA sports-such as volleyball.
 

johndoe

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I, also, have not been in favor of allowing this in the past. But with that said, I think that the limits put on it would actually make for a pretty good rule. Most notably that the students need to have a certain GPA to be eligible to transfer and play immediately, and that this rule would only apply to the first transfer, meaning if they were transfer from their second school to a third, the original rule of sitting out a year would apply.

I think overall this makes sense. It gives the student athletes the freedom to have one do-over if they are in good enough standing academically.
 

howeda7

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This will be a mess. Every freshman who doesn't feel he got enough playing time will be transferring. I would be fine allowing it if the coach leaves or is fired, since I agree that double standard is unfair.
 

JimmyJamesMD

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This will be a mess. Every freshman who doesn't feel he got enough playing time will be transferring. I would be fine allowing it if the coach leaves or is fired, since I agree that double standard is unfair.
Agreed. That makes sense. A lot of these kids pick the school because of the coach. I'm also for having the ability to transfer if you give up your schollie for a year, but still count as a schollie for the school.
 

BleedGopher

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I, also, have not been in favor of allowing this in the past. But with that said, I think that the limits put on it would actually make for a pretty good rule. Most notably that the students need to have a certain GPA to be eligible to transfer and play immediately, and that this rule would only apply to the first transfer, meaning if they were transfer from their second school to a third, the original rule of sitting out a year would apply.

I think overall this makes sense. It gives the student athletes the freedom to have one do-over if they are in good enough standing academically.
I can almost guarantee there will be some coaches putting pressure on professors to hold kids' grades down if they are on the brink of having a high enough GPA to transfer. It won't be widespread, but it will probably be the same percentage of coaches putting pressure on professors to give kids' high enough grades to keep them eligible.

Go Gophers!!
 

chri1673

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Could this get ugly forcing a player lower on the chopping block out, far more frequently if a more desired player is willing to transfer there? I know this happens occasionally each year in recruiting where a coach will pull a scholarship and 'guide' the player elsewhere, i think with the open transfer that may happen far more frequently.
 

principalguy

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I agree with Bilas on this 100%. They're students, why shouldn't they have the same rights as other students to transfer schools without penalty?
Agreed w Bilas [emoji817]

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DLguy

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I agree that some of the rules in the current transfer rule need to be addressed. Such as a school saying where they cannot transfer to needs to be removed, as well as allowing transfers without punishment when a coach leaves. But I agree with them having to sit out a year. Nobody is saying a student cannot transfer. A student can always transfer. If you are truly concerned about the student, the current system is fine with a few minor revisions needed to be made. As far as the athlete, you are accepting a scholarship worth north of $300k because of your ability to play a sport. Because of that, you should expect some guidelines and rules. One of them being the sit out 1 year rule. This is in place to stop everyone from jumping ship at any moment. That would create free agency every spring, which would be a nightmare. Why sign a kid out of high school, when you can just wait for the Sun Belt Player of the Year to announce he is open to transferring?
 

SelectionSunday

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Full force college basketball free agency coming soon to an arena near you.

Make no mistake, the rich will get richer.
 

CentralGopher

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I agree with Bilas on this 100%. They're students, why shouldn't they have the same rights as other students to transfer schools without penalty?
They do already have the same rights as other students to transfer and begin classes when they want. We aren't talking about just going to class though.


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WindyCityGopher

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They do already have the same rights as other students to transfer and begin classes when they want. We aren't talking about just going to class though.


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The NCAA has fought desperately to classify athletes as students and not employees. So they get it both ways...students for the benefit of not having to pay athletes, but when it comes to transferring, athletes don't have the rights as every other student on campus. It's one or the other, but it can't be both.
 

DLguy

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The NCAA has fought desperately to classify athletes as students and not employees. So they get it both ways...students for the benefit of not having to pay athletes, but when it comes to transferring, athletes don't have the rights as every other student on campus. It's one or the other, but it can't be both.
How not. If Amir Coffey, the student, wanted to transfer to another school, what is stopping him? Nothing. However, if he wants to be awarded a scholarship and get all the benefits that go along with that and play basketball for a school sponsored team, he must transfer within guidelines. How does that not seem reasonable?
 

Winasota Gopher

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How not. If Amir Coffey, the student, wanted to transfer to another school, what is stopping him? Nothing. However, if he wants to be awarded a scholarship and get all the benefits that go along with that and play basketball for a school sponsored team, he must transfer within guidelines. How does that not seem reasonable?
This is the argument in 1 sentence. Whether or not those benefits are benefits.... Which, I'm unsure how you could argue they aren't.

I think they should have to sit out if it's done mid season and each school can decide if they integrate an athlete into their team or not. To set a rule that says they have to sit out because they switched school I think is silly. It's self serving and doesn't make any rational sense other than "I don't want my player to leave my team".

These are students and should be treated as such unless you're making them sign a 4 year committed contract that is good both ways. Kid sucks? You are committed to him. Then I'm on board with certain rules being negotiated. Then you've got that slipery slope to deal with that these kids are employees. Then you've got your **** all screwed up.
 

DLguy

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This is the argument in 1 sentence. Whether or not those benefits are benefits.... Which, I'm unsure how you could argue they aren't.

I think they should have to sit out if it's done mid season and each school can decide if they integrate an athlete into their team or not. To set a rule that says they have to sit out because they switched school I think is silly. It's self serving and doesn't make any rational sense other than "I don't want my player to leave my team".

These are students and should be treated as such unless you're making them sign a 4 year committed contract that is good both ways. Kid sucks? You are committed to him. Then I'm on board with certain rules being negotiated. Then you've got that slipery slope to deal with that these kids are employees. Then you've got your **** all screwed up.
Didnt the Big Ten require scholarships to be for 4 years, no longer year to year?
 

CentralGopher

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How not. If Amir Coffey, the student, wanted to transfer to another school, what is stopping him? Nothing. However, if he wants to be awarded a scholarship and get all the benefits that go along with that and play basketball for a school sponsored team, he must transfer within guidelines. How does that not seem reasonable?
+1


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howeda7

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I can almost guarantee there will be some coaches putting pressure on professors to hold kids' grades down if they are on the brink of having a high enough GPA to transfer. It won't be widespread, but it will probably be the same percentage of coaches putting pressure on professors to give kids' high enough grades to keep them eligible.

Go Gophers!!
Kentucky will now give all players C's all the time. For each C you get, a Fed Ex box will accidentally be left outside your dorm.
 

WarriorGopher

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I can almost guarantee there will be some coaches putting pressure on professors to hold kids' grades down if they are on the brink of having a high enough GPA to transfer. It won't be widespread, but it will probably be the same percentage of coaches putting pressure on professors to give kids' high enough grades to keep them eligible.

Go Gophers!!
I know it's possible this could happen, but if it's at all wide-spread, higher education and college athletics have much, much bigger problems.
 

WindyCityGopher

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How not. If Amir Coffey, the student, wanted to transfer to another school, what is stopping him? Nothing. However, if he wants to be awarded a scholarship and get all the benefits that go along with that and play basketball for a school sponsored team, he must transfer within guidelines. How does that not seem reasonable?
Again, there are plenty of "civilian" students who attend college on all types of scholarships, including full academic ones, who are not held to the same guidelines, because there is no governing body controlling their decisions like there is for athletes. If a top student on a full academic ride wants to transfer to another school they feel is better for them and their future prospects, and they can get the same financial assistance, they're free to go without limitation. Why can't an athlete? They're all considered students. How does that not seem reasonable?
 
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