I am shocked this LA times Coffey Article hasn't been posted on here as of yet

diddy3191

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https://www.latimes.com/sports/clip...d-death-clippers-rookie-amir-coffey-minnesota

This section of the article was what spoke to me the most:
The scene is still vivid in his memory: He was in high school, driving home with a friend after stopping for McDonald’s takeout, when he was pulled over. Seeing a white officer approach his window, he went through the mental checklist he’d been taught by his parents while growing up in a state whose percentage of Black residents is half the nationwide average.

Speak to law enforcement in a neutral tone. Make no sudden movements. Keep your hands visible.

“He came up to the car and got the license and registration,” Coffey said. “First thing he said was, ‘Where’s the marijuana?’ Me and my friend were like, ‘What do you mean?’ He’s like, ‘I know you guys have it, I can smell it coming out of the car.’”

The officer called for backup and three cars soon arrived, Coffey said. He and his friend were asked to leave the car as officers began a search. Coffey struggled to understand why the situation escalated so quickly.

“In reality, they were smelling the food or the McChickens,” he said. “It was just too much. It didn’t make any sense. It’s a crazy situation to know you did nothing wrong and you’re still getting treated like that.”

Coffey, 22, encountered racism before. But being pulled over marked the first time that Coffey understood firsthand how an otherwise routine interaction with law enforcement could spiral into something more tense and out of his control.

“There’s always a feeling like, that won’t happen to me,” he said. “Next thing you know you’re actually in that situation. It can happen to anybody.”

That feeling has been reinforced in recent weeks, as Coffey learned how Breonna Taylor, a Black woman, was fatally shot March 13 while sleeping after officers burst into her Louisville home; how Ahmaud Arbery, a Black man, was killed Feb. 23 in Georgia after being confronted by two armed men while jogging; and that the officers in Minneapolis were responding to reports of a man using a counterfeit bill before their encounter with Floyd turned fatal.

“It feels like it’s an everlasting cycle,” Coffey said. “It happens and it gets swept under the rug and no consequences come and it repeats itself. Now that this is happening, people are coming together and fighting for this stuff. It’s important.

“At this point people believe that the route we’re taking is right and I’m going to stand with my people.”
 

theczar

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my people...kinda thing Hitler would say
 

builtbadgers

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I do not say my people but i have no problem with Amir saying it. Our experiences create our views. I have encountered mostly wonderful people from every walk of life. Most police officers are great, the ones that are not need to do something else. Change is difficult but that is how we grow. I have been pulled over twice, both times i was treated very well. Some of those that have not been we need to listen to, learn from and make changes. Thought he came off very thoughtful.
 
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Spaulding!No!

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I have been pulled for what I can only guess is my ethnicity. Worst was the cop who blocked me into a parking spot. He lied about mistaking my tabs as over due then rifled thru my car. The cops never say oh it cuz yer not white.
 

GoldenRodents

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Can someone with inside police experience explain, are they on a quota system? I mean if I needed to book someone by the end of my shift to achieve my bonus, who do I target?
 

golf

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Of course two sides to this. Certainly there are black police and black non police that see this issue a different way than is advanced by Amir's story. Debate rages at off topic board.
 

Gopher Teeth

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I have been pulled for what I can only guess is my ethnicity. Worst was the cop who blocked me into a parking spot. He lied about mistaking my tabs as over due then rifled thru my car. The cops never say oh it cuz yer not white.
Not saying your situation was race based or not, but it is possible it could be just because he was a jerk. I had a white football buddy of mine in college who locked his keys in his car and got a jimmy to unlock his car. Cop came up on him and cuffed him (understandable at this point). My buddy explained what happened and told the cop to check the glove compartment of the car where he had is license and registration to prove it was his car. The cop opened the car, checked his license and registration, shoved them back into the glove compartment, locked the car again (with keys still in the car), drove him down to the station, locked him to a bench for 4 hours, nobody said anything to him, then came out unlocked the cuffs, and told him to leave. Didn't even offer a ride back to his car. Some reason he got off on being a jerk. I know this is not all cops, but it is some. My point is sometimes when bad stuff happens it may not always be a racist motivation, sometimes people are jerks to everyone.
 

CPTMidnight

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https://www.latimes.com/sports/clip...d-death-clippers-rookie-amir-coffey-minnesota
“He came up to the car and got the license and registration,” Coffey said. “First thing he said was, ‘Where’s the marijuana?’ Me and my friend were like, ‘What do you mean?’ He’s like, ‘I know you guys have it, I can smell it coming out of the car.’”
This seems like it happened once a month in high school. ...we were lucky if the Mpls cops didn't take us to the park, handcuff us to a tree, and try to beat sense into us. No preferential treatment treatment for us. Racism... puh-leeze. Coffey what are you smokin?
 

dex8425

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Can someone with inside police experience explain, are they on a quota system? I mean if I needed to book someone by the end of my shift to achieve my bonus, who do I target?
I wouldn't call it a quota system but there are certain "soft expectations" for monthly tickets. Not monthly bookings.
 

Keyser Söze

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Of course two sides to this. Certainly there are black police and black non police that see this issue a different way than is advanced by Amir's story. Debate rages at off topic board.
Bottom line is black people have to deal with stuff, particularly with police, that white people typically don't have to. Candace Owens saying racism or white privilege isn't a thing doesn't mean it's true just because it's coming from a black person, just like a white person saying all white people are racist isn't true just because it's coming from a white person. All you have to do is open your eyes.
 

builtbadgers

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I hope people aren't turning on Amir because he told a true story of something that happened to him. Damn, people are so wrapped up in their politics that they'll shit on an alumnus who was a model player and citizen when he was here.
Great post. Sharing stories about our lives is how we know someone and how we learn.
 

short ornery norwegian

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I caught part of an interview with Rick Spielman from the Vikes. His adopted son, JD Spielman is black. Rick told this story about JD getting stopped by the police, who didn't believe that a black kid would be driving a nice car. Spielman's wife had to go down to the police station to convince the police that JD was their son and had permission to drive the car. Rick Spielman - who is normally very stoic - broke up while relating the story.

I think the point of Coffey's post is that this stuff does not just happen to poor kids in "the ghetto."

Amir Coffey and JD Spielman are kids with solid middle-class or better living situations. and they still deal with this stuff. My brother and his wife adopted two black kids. My nephew has had his own experiences with the police, and he is as middle-class as you get - has a good job and makes a very good living. but he still deals with the same issues.
 

Bad Gopher

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I caught part of an interview with Rick Spielman from the Vikes. His adopted son, JD Spielman is black. Rick told this story about JD getting stopped by the police, who didn't believe that a black kid would be driving a nice car. Spielman's wife had to go down to the police station to convince the police that JD was their son and had permission to drive the car. Rick Spielman - who is normally very stoic - broke up while relating the story.

I think the point of Coffey's post is that this stuff does not just happen to poor kids in "the ghetto."

Amir Coffey and JD Spielman are kids with solid middle-class or better living situations. and they still deal with this stuff. My brother and his wife adopted two black kids. My nephew has had his own experiences with the police, and he is as middle-class as you get - has a good job and makes a very good living. but he still deals with the same issues.
Jim Peterson was a guest of Henry Lake the other night and got similarly borderline emotional talking about his black son and these challenges.
 

golf

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Not saying your situation was race based or not, but it is possible it could be just because he was a jerk. I had a white football buddy of mine in college who locked his keys in his car and got a jimmy to unlock his car. Cop came up on him and cuffed him (understandable at this point). My buddy explained what happened and told the cop to check the glove compartment of the car where he had is license and registration to prove it was his car. The cop opened the car, checked his license and registration, shoved them back into the glove compartment, locked the car again (with keys still in the car), drove him down to the station, locked him to a bench for 4 hours, nobody said anything to him, then came out unlocked the cuffs, and told him to leave. Didn't even offer a ride back to his car. Some reason he got off on being a jerk. I know this is not all cops, but it is some. My point is sometimes when bad stuff happens it may not always be a racist motivation, sometimes people are jerks to everyone.
Bottom line is black people have to deal with stuff, particularly with police, that white people typically don't have to. Candace Owens saying racism or white privilege isn't a thing doesn't mean it's true just because it's coming from a black person, just like a white person saying all white people are racist isn't true just because it's coming from a white person. All you have to do is open your eyes.
You think it is "just Candace Owens"? There is actually no shortage of black thinkers who think racist police force and racism in general are not a problem. Statistics strongly support that racist police force does not exist. Then there is issue of taking responsibility to improve your own life and your own community.

"We are getting closer and closer to the point where nobody is resposible for what they did, but everyone is responsible for what someone else did." Thomas Sowell

Half the country agrees with me, yet any media member or coach who dared say any of the above would be fired. Not the finest time for freedom of speech.

GopherTeeth, I have similar stories.
 
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watertown 1987 guy n

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This has happened too frequently and is the systemic racism people are talking about and it needs to change. There are some good cops and plenty of others that sh!t on the uniform. Thankfully with video becoming so prevalent the playing field is being leveled.
 

Keyser Söze

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You think it is "just Candace Owens"? There is actually no shortage of black thinkers who think racist police force and racism in general are not a problem. Statistics strongly support that racist police force does not exist. Then there is issue of taking responsibility to improve your own life and your own community.

"We are getting closer and closer to the point where nobody is resposible for what they did, but everyone is responsible for what someone else did." Thomas Sowell

Half the country agrees with me, yet any media member or coach who dared say any of the above would be fired. Not the finest time for freedom of speech.

GopherTeeth, I have similar stories.
Virtually every black person has a story about some sort of clear experience with racism. The problem is some people don't want to hear it and just can't stand hearing people complain, so they ignore them and conveniently only listen to people who say things that they like to hear. I promise you far more black people (and just people in general) believe racism both exists and is a major problem. I'm guessing you don't know many (or any) black people. Either that, or you've never asked them about their experiences. You should try that sometime. You might learn something.
 

builtbadgers

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Virtually every black person has a story about some sort of clear experience with racism. The problem is some people don't want to hear it and just can't stand hearing people complain, so they ignore them and conveniently only listen to people who say things that they like to hear. I promise you far more black people (and just people in general) believe racism both exists and is a major problem. I'm guessing you don't know many (or any) black people. Either that, or you've never asked them about their experiences. You should try that sometime. You might learn something.
Great post. I have not had the experience but i have witnessed it and not just blacks. The media is focused on the deaths or violence of blacks and missing out on the millions of harrassments by authorities against blacks. Pleased that young people are speaking out and sharing their experiences. I HAVE BEEN FOCUSING ON THE SYSTEMIC real estate laws on the north side that crush opportunities for minorities and have for decades.This has dashed geberations of families and their ability to get ahead. It is a dirty secret of what makes Minneapolis one of the most segregated cities of size in the country. These studies are peer reviewed. Racism is thriving world wide. What Muslims and Jews put up with is scary as hell. The closest i experienced it worked in my favor. I was told by a professor that since i articulated so well when i talked i would go along way, that people would assume i was intelligent. I also heard uncle Tom a ton from people i played with or worked for and against. I took that as a compliment. For mInorities to have to exist in their lives with greater anxieties, judgements is unacceptable to say nothing of cruel. Each person has to stand up to it and conduct themselves with a dignity that should not be uncommon.
 

golf

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Virtually every black person has a story about some sort of clear experience with racism. The problem is some people don't want to hear it and just can't stand hearing people complain, so they ignore them and conveniently only listen to people who say things that they like to hear. I promise you far more black people (and just people in general) believe racism both exists and is a major problem. I'm guessing you don't know many (or any) black people. Either that, or you've never asked them about their experiences. You should try that sometime. You might learn something.
Perhaps we can agree on some of this. On his podcast, ex navy seal Jocko Willink talks about the need for more training for cops.
He says before leaving for a 6 month deployment, seals undergo 18 months of training. Contrast that intense training with the 2 to 4 hours A YEAR that cops receive on combative situations. Another point he makes is most precincts have no fitness requirements. A less fit cop will feel more vulnerable and a better chance then to act rashly. He also talks about in Iraq a priority was to engage with neighborhoods to win over the locals. Police should make winning the neighbiorhoods a priority. Suggested police ride alongs with the young men in the neighborhood to build bridges.
 

Keyser Söze

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Perhaps we can agree on some of this. On his podcast, ex navy seal Jocko Willink talks about the need for more training for cops.
He says before leaving for a 6 month deployment, seals undergo 18 months of training. Contrast that intense training with the 2 to 4 hours A YEAR that cops receive on combative situations. Another point he makes is most precincts have no fitness requirements. A less fit cop will feel more vulnerable and a better chance then to act rashly. He also talks about in Iraq a priority was to engage with neighborhoods to win over the locals. Police should make winning the neighbiorhoods a priority. Suggested police ride alongs with the young men in the neighborhood to build bridges.
Yeah, we can agree on that, however I do think there are a lot of other things that need to change too.
 

builtbadgers

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Perhaps we can agree on some of this. On his podcast, ex navy seal Jocko Willink talks about the need for more training for cops.
He says before leaving for a 6 month deployment, seals undergo 18 months of training. Contrast that intense training with the 2 to 4 hours A YEAR that cops receive on combative situations. Another point he makes is most precincts have no fitness requirements. A less fit cop will feel more vulnerable and a better chance then to act rashly. He also talks about in Iraq a priority was to engage with neighborhoods to win over the locals. Police should make winning the neighbiorhoods a priority. Suggested police ride alongs with the young men in the neighborhood to build bridges.
All sounds great to me.
 
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