Former Gopher WR Jared Ellerson named AD at Richfield High School

BleedGopher

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per Jason:

Jared Ellerson might be a name familiar to Minnesota Gophers football fans. The receiver was part of the 2000s squads under coach Glen Mason including the first 10-win season in nearly a century in 2003.

Now, Ellerson can be found helping guide the next generation of students coming through the doors of Richfield High School as the new activities director as of July 1.


Ellerson takes over for Dave Boie, who is returning to the classroom as a science teacher at Richfield High School after five years of orchestrating the activities department. This will be Boies’ 25th year in education and he plans to enjoy the vantage point from the stands, cheering on the red and white.

Ellerson’s path to Richfield began in Osseo where he worked with discipline and student services at the high school before deciding to pursue an administrative position. Osseo High School Activities Director Bill Quan helped mentor Ellerson over 3-1/2 years, helping him learn the nuances about what goes into a successful activities department. “He let me look over his shoulder,” Ellerson said, crediting administrative assistant Megan McDonough with a lot of support. “They wanted me to go down the assistant principal path but I needed to figure out which lane I wanted to pursue. I know this is what I wanted to do and so it came down to getting my foot in the door.”

After three years of applying for vacancies, he landed the opportunity at Apollo ahead of last fall.

At Osseo, Ellerson learned about all of the responsibilities of an AD from scheduling to planning events, supervising games and the logistics to make everything from registration, practice, contests including state tournaments and intra-school events run without disruption for the participants.

Last school year was quite an experience as a first-time AD for Ellerson.

“It was a whirlwind experience, that is for sure,” he said. “I just hit the ground running with all of the things that come to the AD from all directions from coaches, students, families, the community and other stakeholders, the school board and superintendent from shooting emails, phone calls and face-to-face meetings. I get it. You have to prioritize and be able to delegate and work together.”

On top of the administrative requirements, attending upward of seven-nine events a week took some time to adjust to the pace.

“Figuring out the learning curve took the most time and then to have COVID-19 come up during the winter just threw another monkey wrench into the experience,” he said.


Go Gophers!!
 

A_Slab_of_Bacon

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I remember when my school got their first AD role ... they just gave it to the head football coach so they could give him a few extra bucks... that was it.

Are these full time jobs and they're not coaching?
 

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As a former Spartan I wish him well. Richfield was a bit of a powerhouse in the 70's when I was there; one of the biggest high schools in the State. Those days are long gone. It was fun playing football on Friday Nights at Spartan Stadium. Former Gopher and NFLer Steve Stewart was a teammate.
 

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Full time and many have assistants. Get paid somewhere between a teacher and principal.

Edit-forgot to quote. Was in reply to slab.
 
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That seems a bit much...
I think some are earning their money, some aren't. Hours can be long since you often work the school day and also attend evening events.
 

A_Slab_of_Bacon

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I think some are earning their money, some aren't. Hours can be long since you often work the school day and also attend evening events.
Not sure you 'have' to attend all the events ... there must be a hell of a lot of work that I'm having trouble imagining...
 

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Not sure you 'have' to attend all the events ... there must be a hell of a lot of work that I'm having trouble imagining...
I'm not sure if it's in their contract that they have to attend events, but I think a lot of schools require that an administrator of some type is present during games and that usually means the AD. I know an AD from a big metro area school quite well and I know he ends up being stuck working a lot of evenings.
 

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I remember when my school got their first AD role ... they just gave it to the head football coach so they could give him a few extra bucks... that was it.

Are these full time jobs and they're not coaching?
It’s really contingent on the structure of the district.

some districts the AD is the next head principal candidate because of the nature of what’s on their plate. Other districts it is barely even a real position.

I don’t know much about Richfield
 

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As a former Spartan I wish him well. Richfield was a bit of a powerhouse in the 70's when I was there; one of the biggest high schools in the State. Those days are long gone. It was fun playing football on Friday Nights at Spartan Stadium. Former Gopher and NFLer Steve Stewart was a teammate.
I graduated from Richfield in 1983. I always say my senior class was the beginning of the end of sports power for the Spartans. In my junior year, the football team was ranked #1 in the state for most of the year (lost to #2 Edina 7-0 when you had to win your conference to go to the playoffs) and hockey and baseball were top three in the state. In my sophomore year, the basketball team reached #3. In my senior year, every team was pretty much .500. A few teams had some success during the rest of the 80s, but it wasn't really sustained, although the basketball teams have been pretty good lately.

Graduating classes went from about 1,000 in the mid-70s to about 200 in the 90s. The AD job at Richfield must be pretty tough now.
 

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I graduated from Richfield in 1983. I always say my senior class was the beginning of the end of sports power for the Spartans. In my junior year, the football team was ranked #1 in the state for most of the year (lost to #2 Edina 7-0 when you had to win your conference to go to the playoffs) and hockey and baseball were top three in the state. In my sophomore year, the basketball team reached #3. In my senior year, every team was pretty much .500. A few teams had some success during the rest of the 80s, but it wasn't really sustained, although the basketball teams have been pretty good lately.

Graduating classes went from about 1,000 in the mid-70s to about 200 in the 90s. The AD job at Richfield must be pretty tough now.
Not doubting most of what you say (my dad is a late 60's Richfield grad). But I'm skeptical that graduating classes were 1000 - that would make Richfield of the 70's several hundred students bigger than Wayzata High School is today.
 

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Not doubting most of what you say (my dad is a late 60's Richfield grad). But I'm skeptical that graduating classes were 1000 - that would make Richfield of the 70's several hundred students bigger than Wayzata High School is today.
They were 10-12 not 9-12 at the time.
 

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They were 10-12 not 9-12 at the time.
Right, but the equivalent of that size. Just knowing the boundaries of the school it seems unlikely they could be that big.
 

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Right, but the equivalent of that size. Just knowing the boundaries of the school it seems unlikely they could be that big.
I don’t actually know first hand but it’s not the first time I’ve heard that number. All those houses were families with multiple kids. Couldn’t probably happen again with the smaller family trend. Bloomington has 3 high schools between 1970-82 due to so many kids
 

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Right, but the equivalent of that size. Just knowing the boundaries of the school it seems unlikely they could be that big.
I rounded up, but it was 950-975. In the early 70s, districts around Richfield, including Edina, Bloomington and Hopkins, all built second high schools, and they all closed a high school 10 years later. Richfield had enough kids for two high schools during that time but didn't build.

Very true that Richfield is a small piece of land, but back then, every house had a few kids in it. Then they all graduated and moved out. The population went from about 42,000 to about 35,000 or so -- it was mostly losing kids.
 

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I rounded up, but it was 950-975. In the early 70s, districts around Richfield, including Edina, Bloomington and Hopkins, all built second high schools, and they all closed a high school 10 years later. Richfield had enough kids for two high schools during that time but didn't build.

Very true that Richfield is a small piece of land, but back then, every house had a few kids in it. Then they all graduated and moved out. The population went from about 42,000 to about 35,000 or so -- it was mostly losing kids.
Just looked up a couple of Richfield yearbooks. Class of 76 was 737 students and class of 73 was 779 students. Very big, but not quite as big as you are remembering. Pretty similar to the Champlin Parks and Blaines of today.
 
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That seems a bit much...
Large school AD’s manage 150 coaches and advisors along with 60 plus programs.
Full time and many have assistants. Get paid somewhere between a teacher and principal.

Edit-forgot to quote. Was in reply to slab.
big school AD’s are managing more than 150 staff a 60 plus programs along with along with balancing a million dollar budget. 1 percent of those district’s general fund. It’s a big job and takes the right person. Turnover is high in this day and age. Eligibility and games alone require 60 hour weeks most weeks. Jared will do well.
 

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Large school AD’s manage 150 coaches and advisors along with 60 plus programs.

big school AD’s are managing more than 150 staff a 60 plus programs along with along with balancing a million dollar budget. 1 percent of those district’s general fund. It’s a big job and takes the right person. Turnover is high in this day and age. Eligibility and games alone require 60 hour weeks most weeks. Jared will do well.
60 plus programs?

Like 60 athletic teams?

At a high school?
 

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Just looked up a couple of Richfield yearbooks. Class of 76 was 737 students and class of 73 was 779 students. Very big, but not quite as big as you are remembering. Pretty similar to the Champlin Parks and Blaines of today.
Thanks for that -- I couldn't find anything specific. I was going by a '77 grad.
 
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