Earth's Warming began before the Industrial Revolution



MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
24,368
Reaction score
5,882
Points
113
Weather slowly warming here in Houston. Homes are built differently here. We haven't hit 10 degrees in over 30 years. Broken water pipes in thousands if not tens of thousands of homes, including mine. Thousands of homes have had no heat and water for three days now, in the end its a minor inconvenience for most of us but more challenging for some. This failure has been building over a number of years and energy companies have made billions of dollars, time to upgrade the grid. Just glad it's back to 70 degrees next week. Hope y'all warm up soon, you deserve some warmer weather.
If your grid was connected to the national grid, like most states' grids are, you could've just purchased power generated in other states.

But then your privatized grid would be subjected to federal regulation, and less profit would go to the owners of producers on the private Texas grid.


What say you, as a person who just went through this extreme event: were a few days of freezing and some broken pipes worth it, for the sake of ideology?
 

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
24,368
Reaction score
5,882
Points
113
Wind did not offer any help despite the huge wind capacity in the state.
Why are you saying that Texas has a "huge" wind capacity? Is it because of, as you said "On May 2nd, 2020, at 2:00am wind energy supplied 59.3% of Texas's energy, which was a record." ?

That doesn't necessarily mean the total capacity is huge. It could just means that at that moment the other types of production were operating far below their max output.

Do you have these total numbers?

They will kill off wind production nearly every time, and I already explained why that is. It's Science.
Why don't wind turbines in the North Sea get "killed off" when it's cold?

Does icing on the blades only happen in Texas?
 
Last edited:

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
24,368
Reaction score
5,882
Points
113
And you're going to pull up an article mentioning 3,500 MWh on one morning? This was after we've been talking about the state needing 69 GWh?
I assume you know that Wh and W are not at all the same thing, correct?

One is a unit of energy, while the other is a unit of power. I trust you understand why they are different concepts.
 


MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
24,368
Reaction score
5,882
Points
113
Question:

I wonder what Big Tech companies that are falling over themselves to move to Texas, as well as their employees, think about all this?
 

justthefacts

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2010
Messages
13,976
Reaction score
4,515
Points
113

MhRBgod.png
 


GopherWeatherGuy

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2013
Messages
9,162
Reaction score
2,925
Points
113
What I pulled up was the head of the Texas power grid specifically stating that coal and natural gas power plants went offline in 2011 and saying that wind had nothing to do with it.

The 3500 MWh was from 10 years ago. That figure is not meant to have anything to do with today. The quote is to show that you were totally making up what caused issues in 2011.

It was 3500 MWh for one morning during a 5 day arctic outbreak. That's still only 1/3 of installed capacity at that time. I watched several of my company's wind farms shut down during that event. I'm not making anything up.

But we can focus on this event. You ignored the questions I asked in my previous post, so I'll ask them again.

1. Why was the actual wind generation yesterday only 1/2 of what was forecasted the previous day?
2. Wind was generating at only 11% of capacity yesterday. An increase of only 2,000 MWh, or 17% of total installed wind capacity would have likely prevented most of the blackouts. Why couldn't ERCOT even generate 17% of total installed wind capacity?

These should be very easy questions to answer since you are now the expert after reading a QA and a few tweets.
 
Last edited:



MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
24,368
Reaction score
5,882
Points
113
How can you have any kind of meaningful discussion about the current state of wind generation -- vis-a-vis a forecast -- without also having a measure of how much actual wind is blowing currently?

"It was forecast last week that wind generation was supposed to be 10,000MW for most of this morning, but in fact it was only outputting 1/3rd of that! See, wind power sucks!"

OK, but was the wind actually blowing that much this morning, to support that hypothetical output??


Also, power is Megawatts, not Megawatt-hours.
 

justthefacts

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2010
Messages
13,976
Reaction score
4,515
Points
113
It was 3500 MWh for one morning during a 5 day arctic outbreak. That's still only 1/3 of installed capacity at that time. I watched several of my company's wind farms shut down during that event. I'm not making anything up.

But we can focus on this event. You ignored the questions I asked in my previous post, so I'll ask them again.

1. Why was the actual wind generation yesterday only 1/2 of what was forecasted the previous day?
2. Wind was generating at only 11% of capacity yesterday. An increase of only 2,000 MWh, or 17% of total installed wind capacity would have likely prevented most of the blackouts. Why couldn't ERCOT even generate 17% of total installed wind capacity?

These should be very easy questions to answer since you are now the expert after reading a QA and a few tweets.

None of that stuff is relevant. You and Fox jumped immediately to wind being the culprit, when in fact wind is only a small part of the problem. Yes, wind will vary, so what? Of course they're not (or at least they shouldn't be) planning for it to be at 100% capacity 24/7, so your percent capacity figures don't tell us anything.

I also find it weird that the CEO of ERCOT as well as federal authorities placed the blame in 2011 on a lot of other different factors, but YOU are the one we should believe about what REALLY happened.
 

BarnBurner

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2010
Messages
15,191
Reaction score
2,165
Points
113
None of that stuff is relevant. You and Fox jumped immediately to wind being the culprit, when in fact wind is only a small part of the problem. Yes, wind will vary, so what? Of course they're not (or at least they shouldn't be) planning for it to be at 100% capacity 24/7, so your percent capacity figures don't tell us anything.

I also find it weird that the CEO of ERCOT as well as federal authorities placed the blame in 2011 on a lot of other different factors, but YOU are the one we should believe about what REALLY happened.
Well then, as has been proven recently, we should always believe federal authorities!
 

GopherWeatherGuy

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2013
Messages
9,162
Reaction score
2,925
Points
113
None of that stuff is relevant. You and Fox jumped immediately to wind being the culprit, when in fact wind is only a small part of the problem. Yes, wind will vary, so what? Of course they're not (or at least they shouldn't be) planning for it to be at 100% capacity 24/7, so your percent capacity figures don't tell us anything.

I also find it weird that the CEO of ERCOT as well as federal authorities placed the blame in 2011 on a lot of other different factors, but YOU are the one we should believe about what REALLY happened.

You still didn't answer my questions. I told you exactly why wind will never be a large contributor during events like this, and I'm right, yet you try to argue weather with me and accused me of making things up. Which I'm not.

Despite all of the issues with non-renewable energy, it's still providing over 95% of the electricity currently being used in Texas. Wind is less than 5%, yet has the capacity to provide over 50% of the current demand.

1613579463054.png

Yet, you and others think that's just a 'small' problem. You said it earlier, other places that are colder and wetter, don't have an issue with wind energy. So why does Texas, especially in situations like this?

~3 million people have been without power for the last two days. If there was no nuclear, coal, or natural gas generation in Texas currently, that number would be 30 million, not 3.
 



cncmin

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
18,186
Reaction score
2,383
Points
113
Weather slowly warming here in Houston. Homes are built differently here. We haven't hit 10 degrees in over 30 years. Broken water pipes in thousands if not tens of thousands of homes, including mine. Thousands of homes have had no heat and water for three days now, in the end its a minor inconvenience for most of us but more challenging for some. This failure has been building over a number of years and energy companies have made billions of dollars, time to upgrade the grid. Just glad it's back to 70 degrees next week. Hope y'all warm up soon, you deserve some warmer weather.
This is a far more insightful post than your earlier one. Seems you're starting to realize what you first thought was true was just another big lie spread by RWers and RW media. Good for you.

As for TX, maybe ya'll need to be better prepared for adverse events. Most of the rest of the country takes measures to prevent pipes from bursting in homes (in particular, proper materials and insulation), to ensure electrical and gas supplies. Your state governance, of which the bulk of your populace has long put in power, has long kowtowed to the elites of the oil base and left your infrastructure rot to keep taxes low. Texas also appears to be failing to adjust to the reality that is the changing and exacerbated weather swings caused by the excess energy of global warming. They're likely to get even worse, not better. Maybe this is karma and a wakeup call to Texans. I doubt it. I see your governor and RW media is already trying to blame windfarms, which occupy less than 10% of your electrical generation, disregarding that windfarms are plentiful in far colder climates than Texas. Far colder climates also have backup plans, since wind never works 100% of the time. The reality of your problems is the lack of appropriate infrastructure in TX related to natural gas was the main issue of this disaster.
 
Last edited:

cncmin

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
18,186
Reaction score
2,383
Points
113
You still didn't answer my questions. I told you exactly why wind will never be a large contributor during events like this, and I'm right, yet you try to argue weather with me and accused me of making things up. Which I'm not.

Despite all of the issues with non-renewable energy, it's still providing over 95% of the electricity currently being used in Texas. Wind is less than 5%, yet has the capacity to provide over 50% of the current demand.

View attachment 11708

Yet, you and others think that's just a 'small' problem. You said it earlier, other places that are colder and wetter, don't have an issue with wind energy. So why does Texas, especially in situations like this?

~3 million people have been without power for the last two days. If there was no nuclear, coal, or natural gas generation in Texas currently, that number would be 30 million, not 3.
Everyone who has wind energy knows it is unreliable, and has a backup plan. Texas did not have a reliable backup plan, and failed to address their energy infrastructure and its many huge vulnerabilities. Hopefully they have learned their lesson.

Stop being such a sucker for the lies of RW media.
 


cncmin

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
18,186
Reaction score
2,383
Points
113
Tucker is such a disgusting, amoral asswipe. He lies almost as often as his hero DJT. There really should be laws that make it a crime for networks that claim to be news to intentionally lie to their viewers. This is the kind of fraudulent sh!t that started the divided mess we're in.
 

Texas-Gopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2010
Messages
2,618
Reaction score
101
Points
63
These renewable energies suck! Got down to 10 degrees last night. Currently have power but lost power from Monday morning at 1am until 4pm yesterday and then again from 1am this morning til 630am. More rolling outages to continue. In my 11 years in Minnesota I don't recall ever losing power during the winter time. Back in the 70's next week. Many down here in Houston have had no power, and some without water since Sunday evening. This is an infrastructure failure! Cant wait til all the blowhard libs make us drive electric vehicles, this will be a common occurrence.
Ted Cruz has to be real proud of this happening in his great state of Texas. Wasn’t he just last week lobbing insults toward Calif. infrastructure?🤔
Ted shut down the coal plants and overloaded the gas pipeline?
 

Texas-Gopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2010
Messages
2,618
Reaction score
101
Points
63
What we really need is another million illegals in Texas. That ought to straighten the infrastructure right out.
 



justthefacts

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2010
Messages
13,976
Reaction score
4,515
Points
113
You still didn't answer my questions. I told you exactly why wind will never be a large contributor during events like this, and I'm right, yet you try to argue weather with me and accused me of making things up. Which I'm not.

Despite all of the issues with non-renewable energy, it's still providing over 95% of the electricity currently being used in Texas. Wind is less than 5%, yet has the capacity to provide over 50% of the current demand.

View attachment 11708

Yet, you and others think that's just a 'small' problem. You said it earlier, other places that are colder and wetter, don't have an issue with wind energy. So why does Texas, especially in situations like this?

~3 million people have been without power for the last two days. If there was no nuclear, coal, or natural gas generation in Texas currently, that number would be 30 million, not 3.

You keep trying to make this discussion into something it isn't.

Conservatives tried to use the situation in Texas as evidence that renewables don't work. In fact, nothing about this situation demonstrates that.
 

GoodasGold

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2011
Messages
11,302
Reaction score
1,864
Points
113
TG is feeling aggrieved. And cold. Let’s let him vent.
 

howeda7

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2008
Messages
54,794
Reaction score
11,706
Points
113
Tucker is such a disgusting, amoral asswipe. He lies almost as often as his hero DJT. There really should be laws that make it a crime for networks that claim to be news to intentionally lie to their viewers. This is the kind of fraudulent sh!t that started the divided mess we're in.
It is, but that will never happen. Besides Tucker/Hannity are not "news" as Fox News lapdog KGF will tell you. Even though their millions of viewers see them as gospel truth.
 


MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
24,368
Reaction score
5,882
Points
113
To make crystal clear:

- what is the (hypothetical) maximum total power output (megawatts) of all wind generation connected to the Texas grid?
- what is the maximum peak demand (megawatts) on the Texas grid during an emergency winter event like this (where a lot of customers are trying to convert electricity into physical heat for warming)?


It's just a guess, but no one should be surprised if the ratio of the above two numbers well less than 50%.
 


Wally

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
7,769
Reaction score
3,701
Points
113
I told you exactly why wind will never be a large contributor during events like this, and I'm right,

Lets say your right. So what. Does that mean the Texas power regulator is not responsible?

Storm chasers going to be getting rich in Texas.
 

BarnBurner

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2010
Messages
15,191
Reaction score
2,165
Points
113
You keep trying to make this discussion into something it isn't.

Conservatives tried to use the situation in Texas as evidence that renewables don't work. In fact, nothing about this situation demonstrates that.
Anyone with a functioning brain knows that renewables are full of lies and subsidies, and dont work well at all.

What happens to the solar panels in 20 years, no facts? How about those wind turbine blades?

Dont repost any rubbish tweets or trash.
 

GopherWeatherGuy

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2013
Messages
9,162
Reaction score
2,925
Points
113
You keep trying to make this discussion into something it isn't.

Conservatives tried to use the situation in Texas as evidence that renewables don't work. In fact, nothing about this situation demonstrates that.

Renewables don't work in these weather conditions. They work well in other weather conditions. This is exactly what I said in my original post.

How does renewables generating less than 5% of current demand suggest they are working in this situation?
 




Top Bottom