Dunlap enters transfer portal

MirandaB

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Hungan your OT is spot on. It’s very discouraging. Continued prayers for your wife.
Now so I can be on-topic, I hope Dunlap is back but more importantly doing at least alright. This is a tough time.
Stay healthy and safe Gopher fans!
 

PoockItInfor6

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I feel for Curtis Dunlap and all the kids going to college today. It does not matter what race or nationality. Many must be going through a lot. The tweet about the suicide prevention hotline is very concerning.

Suicide threat is very real especially with young people. The pandemic, the lock down, the social unrest, and the state of the economy carry a huge burden.




It is particularly tough for African American kids.

OT: How did the country become so angry and divided? It seems like we have lost any sense of civility and civil decency in government and congress. The political courage to compromise for the betterment of the country (not for an agenda of any particular party) is lost among our congressional leaders. It seems that some leaders are more interested in finding blame than solutions.

I pray for my kids, grand kids, and for Mrs. H every night. Mrs. H is not doing very well.
Prayers up for you and your wife, prayers up for Curtis (though I’d like to see this thread fade away, as I think this is all speculation, and could be baseless).
 

A_Slab_of_Bacon

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Unfortunately it's a consequence of our 2 party system and that, for congressional races at least as far as I can tell, moderates are more willing to vote for a candidate that is farther left/right than their political views and the reverse is less true. Due to that, the two parties have drifted away from center.

Unfortunately, due to the way our voting system is set up, it's impossible for other parties to really get started and win. Since most people will avoid voting for a third party that represents them better if they know there is no chance that person wins.

I am left leaning, but the example I know of this is AOC and Biden. In pretty much any other country they would be in different political parties as they hold wildly different views. I'm sure there is a similar situation in the republican party with moderate Republicans and far-right Republicans.

In reality, if we had a voting system that supported it we would likely have at least 4 political parties, and politicians would be forced to compromise because (likely) no one party would hold enough seats to get anything done alone.
I don't so much buy into the idea that a 2 party system automatically creates the situations we see today.

Compromise has been possible much of the time.

Years ago New Gingrich (who I'm not a fan of but he makes astute observations now and then, among his usual hot air) noted that even during the worst of times when he was in congress he had someone in his office who could call the Clinton's in the White House anytime, and they'd answer and they could have an honest conversation that they both knew would remain private.

They also knew that each side could call almost everyone in their party and they'd get in line and they knew where the votes would fall (leaving room for folks who felt they needed to vote against, but also wouldn't hold up legislation).

The important thing was they could talk, and if they made a deal they largely knew they could trust the other side to keep their end of the bargain and execute.

Everyone played the game, but they also knew they needed those they were playing against to work things out.

Regan voted for tax increases, Bush Sr... none of these things were end times type all or nothing deals.

Then during the Obama administration we saw what Gingrich was talking about. Paul Ryan could make a deal one day, but never get the votes the next, and on and on and on...

But now there's no leadership, nobody trusts anyone to make a deal, it's all or nothing all the time.

And the good politicians, many have left, particularly in the GOP, where even BS accusations of compromising on something is an existential problem for your career. Guys who knew how to make a deal can't trust party members to make a deal, they'd rather throw a fit and like the POTUS, declare victory for doing nothing.

And the politicians aren't Sindly Whiplash, I think many actually believe their own BS.

After the 2018 election some folks who lost angrily took to saying that they were voted out by folks 'who wanted free money from the government'. Nobody beat them actually had that as a campaign promise, but I think they really believed it...

But what do we have today? Same guy's who lost, their party is sending out 'free money from the government', but I doubt they're complaining ;)

A 2 party system doesn't have to be that way and it hasn't always been.

But the again, I'd be happy for ranked choice that would give folks a chance to attract a mix of voters and remain viable.
 

Taji34

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I don't so much buy into the idea that a 2 party system automatically creates the situations we see today.

Compromise has been possible much of the time.

Years ago New Gingrich (who I'm not a fan of but he makes astute observations now and then, among his usual hot air) noted that even during the worst of times when he was in congress he had someone in his office who could call the Clinton's in the White House anytime, and they'd answer and they could have an honest conversation that they both knew would remain private.

They also knew that each side could call almost everyone in their party and they'd get in line and they knew where the votes would fall (leaving room for folks who felt they needed to vote against, but also wouldn't hold up legislation).

The important thing was they could talk, and if they made a deal they largely knew they could trust the other side to keep their end of the bargain and execute.

Everyone played the game, but they also knew they needed those they were playing against to work things out.

Regan voted for tax increases, Bush Sr... none of these things were end times type all or nothing deals.

Then during the Obama administration we saw what Gingrich was talking about. Paul Ryan could make a deal one day, but never get the votes the next, and on and on and on...

But now there's no leadership, nobody trusts anyone to make a deal, it's all or nothing all the time.

And the good politicians, many have left, particularly in the GOP, where even BS accusations of compromising on something is an existential problem for your career. Guys who knew how to make a deal can't trust party members to make a deal, they'd rather throw a fit and like the POTUS, declare victory for doing nothing.

And the politicians aren't Sindly Whiplash, I think many actually believe their own BS.

After the 2018 election some folks who lost angrily took to saying that they were voted out by folks 'who wanted free money from the government'. Nobody beat them actually had that as a campaign promise, but I think they really believed it...

But what do we have today? Same guy's who lost, their party is sending out 'free money from the government', but I doubt they're complaining ;)

A 2 party system doesn't have to be that way and it hasn't always been.

But the again, I'd be happy for ranked choice that would give folks a chance to attract a mix of voters and remain viable.
Right it's not just the 2 party system, it's the 2 party system paired with the polarization of the two parties. Which is what I said.

The two party system worked "well" when most the politicians were close to center in their respective parties. Once they started polarizing, and the voters who were sitting up too the polls started voting out the moderates who compromised it all came crashing down.
 

stocker08

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I presented a valid case where “I withdrew my name from the portal” does not mean he’s staying.

How hard would it have been to use precise language?
Not really. Those are the commonly used terms in these sorts of situations. You're looking for something that's not there.
 

MplsGopher

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Not really. Those are the commonly used terms in these sorts of situations. You're looking for something that's not there.
Probably. Just don't think it takes much effort at all to use precise language.
 

stocker08

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If you really think that it is for very little reason, then that is your lack of understanding of the severity of the situation. Football is a very important part of most of the players life, but it is not the only thing that have been working on during their life. Contracting Covid-19 and then having permanent heart or lung damage is a more certain way of having your dream ripped away.

This will pass. You make it seem like the NFL will stop playing football next year and will not have any needs for a new incoming lineman. These organizations are resourceful and they will find a way to fill their needs even if it is not the way you think it should be.

Don't be so naive.
The NFL didn't play any preseason games this year, was that in your plans of how it should be?
The NBA is in a bubble in and does daily testing, was that in your plans of how it should be?
etc, etc.... The point is everyone will figure out how to get what they need done even if it doesn't fit your plans of how it should be?
It's pretty sad that so many are dragging their politics into a decision like this. In reality...the lingering effects of covid are not fully known yet. To err on the side of caution is the prudent thing to do in these cases. And be sure....they aren't considering the season because they now think that covid is not potentially dangerous to contract....they are considering it because they have been working to find ways to make sure it doesn't spread. A lot of the people who are trying to justify herd "immunity" or are making a case that younger folks don't get sick....can't see past their noses for reasons of low information or political opportunism.

I also find it very funny that the same folks that downplay the disease and it's other potential effects....are the ones that seem deathly afraid of getting a vaccine for it. Go figure.
 
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PoockItInfor6

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I don't so much buy into the idea that a 2 party system automatically creates the situations we see today.

Compromise has been possible much of the time.

Years ago New Gingrich (who I'm not a fan of but he makes astute observations now and then, among his usual hot air) noted that even during the worst of times when he was in congress he had someone in his office who could call the Clinton's in the White House anytime, and they'd answer and they could have an honest conversation that they both knew would remain private.

They also knew that each side could call almost everyone in their party and they'd get in line and they knew where the votes would fall (leaving room for folks who felt they needed to vote against, but also wouldn't hold up legislation).

The important thing was they could talk, and if they made a deal they largely knew they could trust the other side to keep their end of the bargain and execute.

Everyone played the game, but they also knew they needed those they were playing against to work things out.

Regan voted for tax increases, Bush Sr... none of these things were end times type all or nothing deals.

Then during the Obama administration we saw what Gingrich was talking about. Paul Ryan could make a deal one day, but never get the votes the next, and on and on and on...

But now there's no leadership, nobody trusts anyone to make a deal, it's all or nothing all the time.

And the good politicians, many have left, particularly in the GOP, where even BS accusations of compromising on something is an existential problem for your career. Guys who knew how to make a deal can't trust party members to make a deal, they'd rather throw a fit and like the POTUS, declare victory for doing nothing.

And the politicians aren't Sindly Whiplash, I think many actually believe their own BS.

After the 2018 election some folks who lost angrily took to saying that they were voted out by folks 'who wanted free money from the government'. Nobody beat them actually had that as a campaign promise, but I think they really believed it...

But what do we have today? Same guy's who lost, their party is sending out 'free money from the government', but I doubt they're complaining ;)

A 2 party system doesn't have to be that way and it hasn't always been.

But the again, I'd be happy for ranked choice that would give folks a chance to attract a mix of voters and remain viable.
There is a lot in this post. I agree with your sentiment, I also agree that people selecting “news” (read often opinions mixed with some current events) sources that affirm their positions, rather than challenging their opinions or just sticking to facts creates a wider chasm in the middle.

One thing I find particularly interesting that I don’t want lost. In your post you bring up a number of examples where Rs compromised as being proof that the system has worked (while I think also presenting yourself as a D). This reminded me of a point that an R made to me a few months back that I had forgotten. His stance was that Ds refuse to negotiate or compromise... Every time you give an inch, they ask for another inch. I’m curious what your thoughts are on this point of view.
 

alchemy2u

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Right it's not just the 2 party system, it's the 2 party system paired with the polarization of the two parties. Which is what I said.

The two party system worked "well" when most the politicians were close to center in their respective parties. Once they started polarizing, and the voters who were sitting up too the polls started voting out the moderates who compromised it all came crashing down.
It worked when the members of the party prioritized the country over the party. What is happening now is the outcome of "forcing" members to tow the party line over the countries best interests. It has lead to the election of hard liners that look at it like a war instead of a duty, members of the opposing party are "enemies" and not colleagues.
 

MplsGopher

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It worked when the members of the party prioritized the country over the party. What is happening now is the outcome of "forcing" members to tow the party line over the countries best interests. It has lead to the election of hard liners that look at it like a war instead of a duty, members of the opposing party are "enemies" and not colleagues.
Primaries are the problem.

Only the most extreme candidates can get the funding needed to win.

Once the extreme candidate has the nomination ... what are moderate voters supposed to do?? Vote for the other party's extreme candidate? They can't do that. And they can't vote third-party or sit out, because that's just a vote for the other party's extremist. They're trapped into voting for their party's extremist, in a "well at least they're better than the other" sense.
 

atsgopher

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Mrs. H is not doing very well.
All the best to Mrs. H.

OT: How did the country become so angry and divided? It seems like we have lost any sense of civility and civil decency in government and congress. The political courage to compromise for the betterment of the country (not for an agenda of any particular party) is lost among our congressional leaders. It seems that some leaders are more interested in finding blame than solutions.

I pray for my kids, grand kids, and for Mrs. H every night. Mrs. H is not doing very well.
The answer is actually rather simple and recurrs throughout human history; age distribution of the youngest slice of adults has gotten large relative to the rest of adults.

They tend to be very emotional and lack wisdom. It becomes reflected in politics. Demographers have long said all civil unrest including civil wars occuring throughout history, are predicted by this number (percentage of young adults to total). I think Civil war number is 12.3%.

Anyhow, last I read we had the same percent as in 1968. You usually have trouble reading about this outside scholarly circles as it is boring. Also, fundamentally sucks as we'd all love to blame the "other side," in politics (those evil people) or our favorite pet answers regarding broken political systems. Thus, journalists ignore it like the plague. It mathematically and logically predicts unrest well before it occurs and with extreme accuracy.
 

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All the best to Mrs. H.



The answer is actually rather simple and recurrs throughout human history; age distribution of the youngest slice of adults has gotten large relative to the rest of adults.

They tend to be very emotional and lack wisdom. It becomes reflected in politics. Demographers have long said all civil unrest including civil wars occuring throughout history, are predicted by this number (percentage of young adults to total). I think Civil war number is 12.3%.

Anyhow, last I read we had the same percent as in 1968. You usually have trouble reading about this outside scholarly circles as it is boring. Also, fundamentally sucks as we'd all love to blame the "other side," in politics (those evil people) or our favorite pet answers regarding broken political systems. Thus, journalists ignore it like the plague. It mathematically and logically predicts unrest well before it occurs and with extreme accuracy.
I’m going to need to see the studies.

The fundamental cause of unrest is our unjust system, not numbers.The lacking wisdom assertion is particularly unwise when, across history, it’s the younger generations who’ve push society forward. It’s never old people, as a mass, advocating the abolition of the systems in which they’re entrenched.

If you like simple answers, world history is the history of class struggle. Shit’s gonna pop off from time to time until that’s no longer the case.
 

swelna

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The answer is actually rather simple and recurrs throughout human history; age distribution of the youngest slice of adults has gotten large relative to the rest of adults.

They tend to be very emotional and lack wisdom. It becomes reflected in politics. Demographers have long said all civil unrest including civil wars occuring throughout history, are predicted by this number (percentage of young adults to total). I think Civil war number is 12.3%.

Anyhow, last I read we had the same percent as in 1968. You usually have trouble reading about this outside scholarly circles as it is boring. Also, fundamentally sucks as we'd all love to blame the "other side," in politics (those evil people) or our favorite pet answers regarding broken political systems. Thus, journalists ignore it like the plague. It mathematically and logically predicts unrest well before it occurs and with extreme accuracy.
I'll need to see some sociology studies on that...but also, that would not explain the huge divide in our government. The vast majority of elected officials are not young people not elected by young people as they historically have a low voter turn out.
 

Iceland12

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I feel for Curtis Dunlap and all the kids going to college today. It does not matter what race or nationality. Many must be going through a lot. The tweet about the suicide prevention hotline is very concerning.

Suicide threat is very real especially with young people. The pandemic, the lock down, the social unrest, and the state of the economy carry a huge burden.


It is particularly tough for African American kids.

OT: How did the country become so angry and divided? It seems like we have lost any sense of civility and civil decency in government and congress. The political courage to compromise for the betterment of the country (not for an agenda of any particular party) is lost among our congressional leaders. It seems that some leaders are more interested in finding blame than solutions.

I pray for my kids, grand kids, and for Mrs. H every night. Mrs. H is not doing very well.
Hope your wife gets thru this as well as can be.

My theory is that if you don't know anybody personally who dealt with it or live in an area that has few if any cases you're skeptical. It's understandable if you have those beliefs. Though if you've been against paying college players it's bemusing to see one scream "they gotta play!"

As for us, we've known at least 10 people who have contacted COVID 19. 1 died, he was in his 80's. Great guy too. Worked for me for about 8-10 years. The rest were in their teens to early 50s. 1 has sustained lifelong damage to some internal organs, 6 others say it was equal or worse than any case of the flu they've had though only 2 had to be hospitalized. 2 others showed minor symptoms at best.

Our nephew is 33. He's a cross country runner/skier and mountain biker. The kind of guy who routinely runs for miles. He was very sick for a few days the beginning of March. Before COVID was suppose to be here. When it got so bad he could barely stand-up a nurse friend told him to go to the hospital. He did. He was in the ICU for 3-4 days. Took him about 6 weeks before he could even walk a mile, let alone run one.

That said, I hope they get College Football back. And sooner than later. Hope the first reports of the Big Ten starting at least by Thanksgiving are workable and true. Just think that any school that has done a "sheetey" job protecting their own students shouldn't be talking about playing "because the "kids want too".

Think they do. Badly too. Just protect your students first and foremost.
 
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MplsGopher

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All the best to Mrs. H.



The answer is actually rather simple and recurrs throughout human history; age distribution of the youngest slice of adults has gotten large relative to the rest of adults.

They tend to be very emotional and lack wisdom. It becomes reflected in politics. Demographers have long said all civil unrest including civil wars occuring throughout history, are predicted by this number (percentage of young adults to total). I think Civil war number is 12.3%.

Anyhow, last I read we had the same percent as in 1968. You usually have trouble reading about this outside scholarly circles as it is boring. Also, fundamentally sucks as we'd all love to blame the "other side," in politics (those evil people) or our favorite pet answers regarding broken political systems. Thus, journalists ignore it like the plague. It mathematically and logically predicts unrest well before it occurs and with extreme accuracy.
No idea how true this could be, but it is an interesting idea nonetheless.

That young people have the courage to want to "radically" change the current system, far beyond what most non-young people know is "reasonable" due to "wisdom".
 

GoldenRodents

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No idea how true this could be, but it is an interesting idea nonetheless.

That young people have the courage to want to "radically" change the current system, far beyond what most non-young people know is "reasonable" due to "wisdom".
@MplsGopher can point to zero violent revolutions cheered on by the young that led to prosperity and human thriving. They are violent because they are inherently irrational and not persuasive during calm and fair debate.

As a great philosopher and composer once said...
Meet the new boss, same as the old boss...
 

MplsGopher

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@MplsGopher can point to zero violent revolutions cheered on by the young that led to prosperity and human thriving. They are violent because they are inherently irrational and not persuasive during calm and fair debate.

As a great philosopher and composer once said...
Meet the new boss, same as the old boss...
I don't advocate for violence. Ideally, regime changes should be peaceful. But others increasingly seem to want it, these days.
 

GoldenRodents

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I don't advocate for violence. Ideally, regime changes should be peaceful. But others increasingly seem to want it, these days.
There have been bloodless revolutions...these weren't championed by the young and ignorant. Compare the Glorious Revolution of 1688 with the French Revolution. Guess which side the current passions are emulating?


Go Gophers
 

Wally

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This is a football forum not politics. Please discuss politics in the "Off-Topic Board: Politics and Current Events "
Looks to me like he really wants Dunlap to re-enter the transfer portal
 

hungan1

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Thank you all for your support.

One can only be impressed with PJ Fleck.

IRC, when the shut down started (and the George Floyd killing) he focused immediately on having team meetings with the players & recruits, then parents of both the recruits & the players, and then all of them combined.

He did this instead of making a public statement first. He put the kids ahead of any PR statements.

I wouldn't be surprised if the parents of the players, Dunlop's included, trust what the Gopher staff and coaches are doing to fully support them.

The mental health of the kids are pretty fragile. Staying as a group and working out and practicing together is the best therapy.

Let's hope and pray a vaccine, or a combination of treatments happens soon.
 
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MNGopher23

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Says the guy with the Alex Jones photo.. Are you kidding me? Have you lost touch with reality troll?
I'm a troll? Please point to one of my posts or replies that even hint at me being a troll. Just because I have a picture of Alex Jones screaming equates me to being a troll? Okay... I guess we can't have funny profile pictures on this site.
 

hungan1

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Hungan your OT is spot on. It’s very discouraging. Continued prayers for your wife.
Now so I can be on-topic, I hope Dunlap is back but more importantly doing at least alright. This is a tough time.
Stay healthy and safe Gopher fans!
Mrs. H was called to The Lord early Sunday morning. I assured her I was with her to comfort her through her journey. I told her that I loved her and kissed her on the forehead. She smiled and squeezed my hand.

The cancer had rapidly progressed into her brain. She fought a courageous battle for two years. Our wedding anniversary was Saturday. She miraculously recovered with her mental capacity restored in time for my son who came from CA and my daughter and I to have about ten hours together as a family. God has granted us that extra special day with her. We are feeling utterly lost and heart broken.
 
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Unregistered User

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Mrs. H was called to The Lord early Sunday morning. I assured her I was with her to comfort her through her journey. I told her that I loved her and kissed her on the forehead. She smiled and squeezed my hand.

The cancer had rapidly progressed into her brain. She fought a courageous battle for two years. Our wedding anniversary was Saturday. She miraculously recovered with her mental capacity restored in time for my son who came from CA and my daughter and I to have about ten hours together as a family. God has granted us that extra special day with her. We are feeling utterly lost and heart broken.
My condolences. Sorry for your loss, and I hope you find peace.
 

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Mrs. H was called to The Lord early Sunday morning. I assured her I was with her to comfort her through her journey. I told her that I loved her and kissed her on the forehead. She smiled and squeezed my hand.

The cancer had rapidly progressed into her brain. She fought a courageous battle for two years. Our wedding anniversary was Saturday. She miraculously recovered with her mental capacity restored in time for my son who came from CA and my daughter and I to have about ten hours together as a family. God has granted us that extra special day with her. We are feeling utterly lost and heart broken.
So sorry for your loss. It sounds like you two had a long and amazing relationship.
 
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