Do you wear a mask?

When you go out to places like the grocery store, do you wear a mask?

  • Yes, I think it helps slow the spread

    Votes: 26 36.1%
  • Yes, I'm not sure how much it helps but it's no big deal to wear one

    Votes: 16 22.2%
  • Yes, but only because I'm required to

    Votes: 7 9.7%
  • No, I don't think it helps

    Votes: 9 12.5%
  • No, It's my decision/I'm healthy so not at risk

    Votes: 9 12.5%
  • No, They're uncomfortable/can't use them due to a health condition

    Votes: 2 2.8%
  • No, it makes us look weak/I'm not going to live in fear

    Votes: 4 5.6%
  • Other, post below

    Votes: 4 5.6%

  • Total voters
    72

golfing18now

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Real Americans don't wear masks. Got it.
I wouldn't try to defend the idiotic comment made by the customer in this case. But, as you know I'm sure, we could both find moronic tweets/comments on either side about this or any other current event. It's the world we live in.

What was interesting to me about this particular tweet by sharpest of cheeses.....if you read her next few tweets it speaks to how she views herself at "SIGNIFICANT risk". She looks to be about 30 years old, not obese, pre-diabetic, and wants to get pregnant. Somehow the message isn't getting out to people about who this really affects. 408 out of 507 deaths in MN are nursing home deaths. The median age is still close to 80. Why the pervasive and almost debilitating fear in some people?
 

GophersInIowa

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So our leading American immunologist and head of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases didn't know masks would work in March, but does now? Okey dokey.

You're really that naive?
So you don't think we know significantly more about the virus now than what we did back in early March? What incentive does he or anyone else have in now recommending masks?
 

Bad Gopher

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I wouldn't try to defend the idiotic comment made by the customer in this case. But, as you know I'm sure, we could both find moronic tweets/comments on either side about this or any other current event. It's the world we live in.

What was interesting to me about this particular tweet by sharpest of cheeses.....if you read her next few tweets it speaks to how she views herself at "SIGNIFICANT risk". She looks to be about 30 years old, not obese, pre-diabetic, and wants to get pregnant. Somehow the message isn't getting out to people about who this really affects. 408 out of 507 deaths in MN are nursing home deaths. The median age is still close to 80. Why the pervasive and almost debilitating fear in some people?
It depends what one means by significant risk. I consider me, you and everyone to be at significant risk at this time. To me, significant is less than considerable but more than negligible.

Maybe I'm more sensitive about this than others because my lungs are my one and only Achilles heel.
 

cjbfbp

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408 out of 507 deaths in MN are nursing home deaths. The median age is still close to 80. Why the pervasive and almost debilitating fear in some people?
I keep hearing this mantra around here from the usual suspects. Death isn't the only destructive effect of this disease. It has been shown to cause significant damage to lungs, heart, and kidneys in patients. A person could avoid death but have after effects that are significantly debilitating going forward. Depending upon the person, one can't be assured of being hospitalized, discharged, and being as good as new afterward.
 

LesBolstad

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So you don't think we know significantly more about the virus now than what we did back in early March? What incentive does he or anyone else have in now recommending masks?
Absolutely doesn't pass the smell test (no pun intended) at all. He knew the virus in March. My guess it's a cover his ass motive by now recommending masks. He knows their benefit is negligible at best; and per the video may cause more harm than good.
 

GophersInIowa

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Absolutely doesn't pass the smell test (no pun intended) at all. He knew the virus in March. My guess it's a cover his ass motive by now recommending masks. He knows their benefit is negligible at best; and per the video may cause more harm than good.
They didn't know how easily asymptomatic transmission was two months ago. That's one of the biggest changes.
 

GoodasGold

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Absolutely doesn't pass the smell test (no pun intended) at all. He knew the virus in March. My guess it's a cover his ass motive by now recommending masks. He knows their benefit is negligible at best; and per the video may cause more harm than good.
Here’s one endorsed by IMPOTUS himself. You can wear it to the rally!
CBA73B6E-83D0-44F8-83B0-976E611CD07C.jpeg
 

Veritas

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I think a mask helps stop an infected person from infecting not infected people far better than if stops a non infected person from getting infected by infected people. Therefore, because I am not infected, I do not wear a mask as I bike ride or go out for walks. I have had no contact with stores, etc. for seven weeks now.
 

GoodasGold

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I think a mask helps stop an infected person from infecting not infected people far better than if stops a non infected person from getting infected by infected people. Therefore, because I am not infected, I do not wear a mask as I bike ride or go out for walks. I have had no contact with stores, etc. for seven weeks now.
Have u lost weight?
 

GophersInIowa

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I think a mask helps stop an infected person from infecting not infected people far better than if stops a non infected person from getting infected by infected people. Therefore, because I am not infected, I do not wear a mask as I bike ride or go out for walks. I have had no contact with stores, etc. for seven weeks now.
I definitely don't think it's necessary to wear one when going for walks or bike rides in most situations because you're not getting close to other people. We go for walks just about everyday and people are really good about keeping their distance. When I go I usually have a 3 year old on a balance bike and a dog on a leash with me so it's hard for us to change our path. Most people are really good about walking around us on the street while we stay on the sidewalk or some will even cross the street.

It's funny because even though we're staying further away from each other, I feel like many people are friendlier when we're out on our walks.
 

Ogee Oglethorpe

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It depends what one means by significant risk. I consider me, you and everyone to be at significant risk at this time. To me, significant is less than considerable but more than negligible.

Maybe I'm more sensitive about this than others because my lungs are my one and only Achilles heel.
Do you mind if I ask what it is you're afraid of at this time? I'm not picking on you, I'm only asking you because you mentioned considering yourself and everyone at "significant risk".

I guess more specifically, what is it that today you would do but you won't do because you feel you are at risk? For example, "I would go to the grocery store but I'm not going to because I feel there's too much risk". Or maybe it's going to Best Buy or some retail store like that?

Just in general, I'm trying to understand what it is that people are afraid of TODAY. I mean, we all have some control over our immediate environment and over what WE do ourselves. I have hand sanitizer, I have masks if I need them, I make a good effort to steer clear of people I encounter, try not to touch things that others have touched (and if I do, immediately use hand sanitizer).

Using those basic practices, I can't think of a single thing that I wouldn't feel comfortable doing right now. Not a thing. So I'm trying to honestly understand what it is some people are afraid of?
 

Deleted_User

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Knowledge is power, and it's people like you who have control issues. It bugs the shit out of you that people aren't participating in the economy exactly the way you want them to. Again, money.

When it comes to risk acceptance, people are on a bell curve. People aren't stupid, and they have good instincts, but they weigh risk differently. I break it up into three categories:

RECKLESS:
This is the pastor--was it in Florida?--who held services out of defiance and recklessness and ended up dying...and probably took some of his congregants with him. These are the people who don't take the dangers at the Grand Canyon seriously and end up falling to their death. (I don't think you're in this category. I think you're more like the sociopath who eggs on others to take unnecessary risks while you sit home in safety and count your money.)

OVERLY CAUTIOUS:
These are the people who won't get within 10 feet of the Grand Canyon rim and certainly won't hike below the rim, which is the best part of enjoying the park. These folks might not even go to the Grand Canyon because of the dangers. One of the seven of my friends who I traveled to Glacier Park with was overly afraid of heights. He toughed it out for most of the trip, but he couldn't do the Highline Trail because of the quarter-mile stretch where the trail is 6 feet wide, carved into the cliff, and has a 100-foot sheer dropoff on one side. We didn't even ask him to go with us. Bless his heart--he did the right thing for him, but he missed out on the signature hike in the park.

MOST PEOPLE:
Are willing to accept reasonable risks but aren't reckless or foolhardy. Think before they do anything too risky but will hike the Highline Trail and jump out of an airplane. Will wear masks during a historic health crisis because, well, why not? Get called pussies by asshole cowboy political partisans.
One of the top 10 posts I have ever enjoyed on GH. Well stated.
 

MennoSota

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I only wear a mask when I'm on a heist. Otherwise, I wear a tutu. 🕺
 

Pompous Elitist

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I keep hearing this mantra around here from the usual suspects. Death isn't the only destructive effect of this disease. It has been shown to cause significant damage to lungs, heart, and kidneys in patients. A person could avoid death but have after effects that are significantly debilitating going forward. Depending upon the person, one can't be assured of being hospitalized, discharged, and being as good as new afterward.
This is true of a huge number of diseases and illnesses. Everything from
permanent cancer treatment side effects to residuals of benign brain tumor surgery to heart attacks to infectious diseases. Things as innocuous as long term Motrin use, dust inhalation, sun exposure, can cause issues and the list goes on. The inflammation IS severe and some people will have longer term issues after being in the ICU. Most of those people already had a number of other problems. We all get old and die eventually. Most of us start feeling “it” in our 40s.
 

howeda7

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Wouldn't that be the kicker? And he couldn't even get a rain check? The definition of oppression right there!
And Fox News hosts can't use Amazon apparently, being owned by Libs and what not. It's tough.
 

howeda7

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I'm glad the Cauldron Crew of Ansoon County is eating fresh and healthy!

 

Deleted_User

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This is true of a huge number of diseases and illnesses. Everything from
permanent cancer treatment side effects to residuals of benign brain tumor surgery to heart attacks to infectious diseases. Things as innocuous as long term Motrin use, dust inhalation, sun exposure, can cause issues and the list goes on. The inflammation IS severe and some people will have longer term issues after being in the ICU. Most of those people already had a number of other problems. We all get old and die eventually. Most of us start feeling “it” in our 40s.
This is a stretch. You have taken things so out of context. Motrin isn't even close to the effects of Covid-19.

Type 1 pneumocytes are destroyed by CV19. Type 2 then respond to regenerate into type 1, but, that uisually doesn't happen with Covid. Instead, it ultimately ends up being scar tissue. Where there is scar tissue, there is no gas exchange. The result of which is the lungs reduced capacity on a permanent basis. It is why the military will not accept recovered CV19 patients into the service. These people will ultimately be seen as having a lifelong condition as a result.

You have reached the ignore zone for being a dumbass.
 

cjbfbp

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Therefore, because I am not infected, I do not wear a mask as I bike ride or go out for walks. I have had no contact with stores, etc. for seven weeks now.
I don't think many people at all wear a mask when they are riding a bike or going for a walk. They might have one handy (just in case) but don't use it unless they have to. I had one around my neck when walking a couple of weeks ago on a path that was miles from my house and much more crowded than I expected. I flipped it up and down multiple times during the walk but that is the only time I've felt I've had to do that.

If you're not going into stores, there's probably not much reason to use one but having one available, just in case you find yourself in a crowd, is probably a good idea.
 

justthefacts

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So our leading American immunologist and head of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases didn't know masks would work in March, but does now? Okey dokey.

You're really that naive?


The way science works is that you continually observe and learn new information and revise your conclusions. I know that it's hard to take in information that contradicts your earlier beliefs, but you should try it some time.

Here's Fauci now:




The University of Minnesota commentary above says it's not proven whether cloth masks help stop the spread. In general scientists are mixed: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/04/scientists-disagree-over-face-masks-effect-on-covid-19 But what does it hurt? Koreans and Japanese wear masks, and their countries are much denser than ours, yet have much less severe outbreaks.

As for the idiotic question, "if masks work, why quarantine" the idea is that masks HELP, they're not perfect. Social distancing HELPS. Washing your hands HELPS. You add them together and it helps even more. This question is so silly and infantile that it's clear that it's not being asked in good faith. A 9 year old who sits and thinks about it for 2 minutes can figure this out. The history of the discussion for 2 months has been that there's a group of people who thinks that if they just deny hard enough, the virus will not be a problem, and then that group getting continually proven wrong about its severity.
 
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