Do you wear a mask?

When you go out to places like the grocery store, do you wear a mask?

  • Yes, I think it helps slow the spread

    Votes: 48 42.9%
  • Yes, I'm not sure how much it helps but it's no big deal to wear one

    Votes: 25 22.3%
  • Yes, but only because I'm required to

    Votes: 11 9.8%
  • No, I don't think it helps

    Votes: 11 9.8%
  • No, It's my decision/I'm healthy so not at risk

    Votes: 12 10.7%
  • No, They're uncomfortable/can't use them due to a health condition

    Votes: 2 1.8%
  • No, it makes us look weak/I'm not going to live in fear

    Votes: 7 6.3%
  • Other, post below

    Votes: 6 5.4%

  • Total voters
    112

GophersInIowa

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Under investigation because he is honest. And, you dont like that one bit.
Honest about what? That hospitals get funding based on if patients are listed as Covid? No one is disputing that. But there's no proof that people are being misdiagnosed on purpose, and certainly no evidence it's happening a bunch.

And then again, he doesn't seem to understand (or more than likely is purposely not speaking the truth because people will believe him) the basics of how viruses travel.
 

BarnBurner

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Honest about what? That hospitals get funding based on if patients are listed as Covid? No one is disputing that. But there's no proof that people are being misdiagnosed on purpose, and certainly no evidence it's happening a bunch.

And then again, he doesn't seem to understand (or more than likely is purposely not speaking the truth because people will believe him) the basics of how viruses travel.
So GII knows the basics of how the virus travels and Dr Jensen doesn't.

Did I do that right?
 

GophersInIowa

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So GII knows the basics of how the virus travels and Dr Jensen doesn't.

Did I do that right?
No, people that study viruses know and I listen to them. The same way I would listen to my dentist when I have a problem with my teeth and not my general practice doctor.

He knows, he's just purposely leaving that part out because the people he's speaking to don't want to hear it. He's just playing to his audience.
 

BarnBurner

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No, people that study viruses know and I listen to them. The same way I would listen to my dentist when I have a problem with my teeth and not my general practice doctor.

He knows, he's just purposely leaving that part out because the people he's speaking to don't want to hear it. He's just playing to his audience.
Sure thing.
 

Go4Broke

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Wearing a mask doesn't just protect others from COVID, it protects you from infection, perhaps serious illness, too

While cloth face coverings aren't 100% effective, "wearing them means you're exposed to less virus. Less is coming in from other people and you're inhaling less. It's a win-win," said Dr. John Brooks, a medical epidemiologist and the CDC's chief medical officer for the agency’s COVID-19 response.

If the American public were to embrace masking now, Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the pandemic could be brought to heel. "If we could get everybody to wear a mask right now I really do think over the next 4-6-8 weeks, I really think we can bring this under control," he said in an interview Tuesday with the editor in chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Masks could mean getting less sick

A hypothesis among some infectious disease experts is that those infected while wearing masks breath in a lower dose of the virus and as a result often have less severe illness. A forthcoming article in the Journal of General Internal Medicine lays out the theory. It makes a lot of sense, said Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, an expert in health policy at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “Wearing a mask may protect the mask wearer more than we realize," he said. "This paper provides a new explanation for lower rates of death in areas where mask wearing is common, as well as an even stronger rationale for all of us to wear masks when around others."

The rationale is based on the medical concept of "viral inoculum," or how much virus someone is exposed to. The evidence about viral, bacterial or fungal exposure affecting how sick someone gets goes back to the 1930s. “We know this for gastrointestinal viruses, sexually transmitted diseases and respiratory infections. The bigger the load the more you get in your system the more severe the disease,” said Dr. Monica Gandhi, a professor of medicine and infectious disease expert at the University of California, San Francisco and co-author on the paper.

Wearing a cloth face covering is estimated to screen out between 65% and 85% of viral particles, said Dr. Chris Beyrer, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and another author. Depending on how robust the person’s immune system is, a smaller exposure seems to correlate with milder cases of COVID-19. It's probably because with a smaller amount of virus to deal with, the body’s immune system has a better chance of mounting a defense, the paper's authors suggest.

It’s seen in many other diseases, said Otto Yang, a professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA “When somebody’s infected with a virus, there’s immediately a race between the virus replicating itself and the immune system. The bigger the inoculum a person gets, the bigger head start the virus has,” he said.

It also appears people who wear masks but contract the disease are much more likely to be asymptomatic, meaning theyhave COVID-19 but no symptoms. "If you’re going to get this virus, you want to have an asymptomatic infection. As so many people who’ve survived it have said, it’s not an ordinary flu. People are very sick, even those who don't require hospitalization," said Beyrer.

The idea remains a hypothesis because the scientists don't have specific data as it's impossible to do studies in humans. “We can’t spray SARS-CoV-2 virus in people’s faces at lower and higher doses and see who gets sicker,” said Gandhi. But there is animal data. A study in hamsters found if masks were used to filter the air into their cages, they were less likely to become infected with COVID-19, and if they did get infected, they had milder disease.

There’s also ecological evidence from the pandemic that seems to bear this out. Take the case of two cruise ships that both had COVID-19 onboard. "Cruise ships in some ways are like a natural experiment. Things were done differently on different ships and the outcomes were different," said Beyrer.

The first was the Diamond Princess, where 18% of those who got infected with COVID-19 were asymptomatic. Very few passengers wore masks. A later infection hit the another cruise ship called the Shackleton. When the first case appeared, all passengers were issued surgical masks and all staff wore N-95 masks. While 58% of passengers and crew ended up becoming infected with COVID-19, a full 81% of them were asymptomatic. Another example comes from Oregon, where everyone in a fish processing plant was issued masks each day at work. While 33% of workers tested ended up being positive for COVID-19, 95% of them were asymptomatic.

In countries where a high percentage of the population wear masks, the number of cases may rise but the number of deaths falls. Some models show that if 80% of people wear masks, death rates from COVID-19 stay very low.

In the United States, San Francisco has a very high level of mask wearing, and while cases have been going up, the death rate has remained flat. In fact, there have been no new deaths since June 27. The city also is showing a high level of asymptomatic cases. A high level of asymptomatic cases means that fewer people are actually getting sick from COVID-19 and those that are are less likely to spread the disease.

Face masks could be key to getting back to as normal as possible before a vaccine is available. It will still require social distancing and hand washing, but maskingcould allow things to open up, said the CDC's Brooks. "What we’re saying is, if everybody will adopt cloth face coverings we can begin to socializing again without shutting down the economy," he said.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news...-against-catching-severe-covid-19/5431323002/
 
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Go4Broke

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Alabama just announced they will now require everyone in the state to wear a mask when they are out in public. It is the 25th state to do so.
 
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justthefacts

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Alabama just announced they will now require everyone in the state to wear a mask when the are out in public. It is the 36th state to do so.
Clearly they are just fomenting fear in an attempt to prevent Trump from being re-elected, just like Walmart is.


This will be very interesting to see in action.
 

Go4Broke

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Clearly they are just fomenting fear in an attempt to prevent Trump from being re-elected, just like Walmart is.


This will be very interesting to see in action.
I just corrected the number of states down to 25. The info on the TV report was wrong. Furthermore, Walmart just announced they are now requiring masks in all their stores in every state. Best Buy did it yesterday. Expect Target to follow suit in short order.
 

Costa Rican Gopher

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Clearly they are just fomenting fear in an attempt to prevent Trump from being re-elected, just like Walmart is.


This will be very interesting to see in action.
Nice to see WalMart got on board 19 weeks in, when the death toll is the lowest since March 14th. This move just screams "Science".

 
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howeda7

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We're shooting ourselves in the foot, re-loading and shooting the other foot. Pure idiocy.

 

justthefacts

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All deaths involving Covid-19:

4/11/2020 16,014
4/18/2020 16,909
4/25/2020 15,225
5/2/2020 12,979
5/9/2020 10,963
5/16/2020 8,944
5/23/2020 6,947
5/30/2020 5,868
6/6/2020 4,646
6/13/2020 3,702
6/20/2020 2,892
6/27/2020 1,675
7/4/2020 643
7/11/2020 272

Provisional Death Counts for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
We've talked about provisional deaths here a lot. The recent numbers are ALWAYS undercounted, and the link you have provided says so.



Read more here:


 

Nokomis

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It's such an incredibly minor inconvenience. I just don't get it.

I was again the only parent wearing a mask at my sons' baseball game last night even after the league director explicitly asked spectators to wear them (see earlier prior post for my rant). Is it a peer pressure thing? You don't want to look uncool with the other parents? I just don't get it.
 

GopherWeatherGuy

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I don't think anyone ever touted most of those countries. South Korea is normally the number 1 reference:



Also:

Plenty of experts have touted Japan and SE Asia.

South Korea took extreme measures that will not happen here.
 

Nokomis

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CDC Director Redfield says universal mask wearing could get the virus under control in 4-8 weeks and save up to 45,000 lives by November.

 

cjbfbp

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It's such an incredibly minor inconvenience. I just don't get it.

I was again the only parent wearing a mask at my sons' baseball game last night even after the league director explicitly asked spectators to wear them (see earlier prior post for my rant). Is it a peer pressure thing? You don't want to look uncool with the other parents? I just don't get it.
Yes, I think it's exactly that. Within every group there is probably a critical mass required to get enough people to wear a mask. I don't know what that is but I'll take a naive guess of 50%. Let's say there were 60 people in attendance at a youth baseball game. If 50% of them wore a mask, it probably wouldn't be too difficult to get that percentage up to 75% or 80% for the next game. You will never get it up to 100% unless there are enforced penalties for failure to wear a mask. But, most of the remaining 20% to 25% who didn't wear a mask might at least keep their distance from those wearing them.
 

GoodasGold

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Nowhere in the US Constitution does it say I have to wear a mask. 🤬
 

GophersInIowa

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Wasn't Japan and southeast Asia touted as the poster children of how masks stop the spread?

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For Japan, that's the equivalent to just about 1,000 cases a day in the US when taking population into account. I think we'd all love to be in this position right now. The spread can go in cycles. And again, no one has claimed masks completely stop the spread. So far these places have kept their peaks significantly lower than places like the US. It's not even close, honestly.
 
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BarnBurner

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It's such an incredibly minor inconvenience. I just don't get it.

I was again the only parent wearing a mask at my sons' baseball game last night even after the league director explicitly asked spectators to wear them (see earlier prior post for my rant). Is it a peer pressure thing? You don't want to look uncool with the other parents? I just don't get it.
Outdoors, correct?
 

Spoofin

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Yes, I think it's exactly that. Within every group there is probably a critical mass required to get enough people to wear a mask. I don't know what that is but I'll take a naive guess of 50%. Let's say there were 60 people in attendance at a youth baseball game. If 50% of them wore a mask, it probably wouldn't be too difficult to get that percentage up to 75% or 80% for the next game. You will never get it up to 100% unless there are enforced penalties for failure to wear a mask. But, most of the remaining 20% to 25% who didn't wear a mask might at least keep their distance from those wearing them.
I agree with this theory. The more people around wearing masks, the more comfortable others are in wearing them. The less people, the more uncomfortable people are to wear them. It would make sense if we were all teenagers, but for adults to act this way is embarrassing.
 

Ogee Oglethorpe

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I agree with this theory. The more people around wearing masks, the more comfortable others are in wearing them. The less people, the more uncomfortable people are to wear them. It would make sense if we were all teenagers, but for adults to act this way is embarrassing.
I'll be completely honest, if I'm pretty confident that I can keep a reasonable distance from anyone else, I'm not wearing a mask. I wear one in businesses that require it and say as much on the door going in, but if I can keep a safe distance from others, I just don't do it. Apologies if that makes me a bad person. My wife has been tested twice in the last 3-4 weeks (had shoulder surgery, it was required) and also was tested for the antibodies and came up negative so I'm about 99% sure that I don't have it.
 

Nokomis

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Yes, I think it's exactly that. Within every group there is probably a critical mass required to get enough people to wear a mask. I don't know what that is but I'll take a naive guess of 50%. Let's say there were 60 people in attendance at a youth baseball game. If 50% of them wore a mask, it probably wouldn't be too difficult to get that percentage up to 75% or 80% for the next game. You will never get it up to 100% unless there are enforced penalties for failure to wear a mask. But, most of the remaining 20% to 25% who didn't wear a mask might at least keep their distance from those wearing them.
Yeah, that's my impression too. People just have to get used to it. Not much of a fuss anymore at places like Menards. I don't even really notice mine anymore. Except when I go to take a sip of Gatorade and spill it down my neck.

I deliberately only wear my mask at the baseball game while seated in my collapsible lawn chair. I walk up and leave without wearing a mask to show I'm not a mask fanatic who wears it 24/7. I also wore my curved bill Gopher M hat and Century Panthers t-shirt to show I'm still a cool sports dad. You don't have to call me a vigilante hero, but you could. If I can get just one other parent to join me in wearing a mask at our kids' baseball game, I've done my job.
 

BarnBurner

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Yeah, that's my impression too. People just have to get used to it. Not much of a fuss anymore at places like Menards. I don't even really notice mine anymore. Except when I go to take a sip of Gatorade and spill it down my neck.

I deliberately only wear my mask at the baseball game while seated in my collapsible lawn chair. I walk up and leave without wearing a mask to show I'm not a mask fanatic who wears it 24/7. I also wore my curved bill Gopher M hat and Century Panthers t-shirt to show I'm still a cool sports dad. You don't have to call me a vigilante hero, but you could. If I can get just one other parent to join me in wearing a mask at our kids' baseball game, I've done my job.
More risk while seated in your own chair, outdoors?
 
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