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RememberMurray

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In the immense entirety of human world history, this was truly one of the greatest, most pivotal moments.

Ordinary people, from all walks of life, were tasked with performing extraordinary feats, knowing full well that the fate of their world was in the balance.

And they came through, unflinchingly. It is simply amazing. Astounding.

I wonder: would we be up to a similar task today?
 
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RememberMurray

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I had two uncles, both long deceased. One was at Normandy, the other fought in the Battle of the Bulge.

Neither one ever spoke much about their experiences.
 

RememberMurray

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"First Generation Antifa", indeed!

They certainly were...
 

KillerGopherFan

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Good thread.

I hope to visit the Normandy historical sites someday. Band of Brothers was one of the best TV productions that I’ve ever watched. Especially intrigued by the interviews of the real characters portrayed in the mini-series for perspective regarding the previous posts.

My father was a US Marine at Guadacanal and my uncle, his older brother, was awarded a Bronze Star for actions at Luzon in the Philippines. An exploding grenade cost him much of his hearing for the rest of his life.
 


RememberMurray

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Good thread.

I hope to visit the Normandy historical sites someday. Band of Brothers was one of the best TV productions that I’ve ever watched. Especially intrigued by the interviews of the real characters portrayed in the mini-series for perspective regarding the previous posts.

My father was a US Marine at Guadacanal and my uncle, his older brother, was awarded a Bronze Star for actions at Luzon in the Philippines. An exploding grenade cost him much of his hearing for the rest of his life.

The amazing thing, to me, is that they made these sacrifices without expecting anything in return beyond the knowledge that they had done their best and given their all.

Remarkable.
 

boofbonser

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Good thread.

I hope to visit the Normandy historical sites someday. Band of Brothers was one of the best TV productions that I’ve ever watched. Especially intrigued by the interviews of the real characters portrayed in the mini-series for perspective regarding the previous posts.

My father was a US Marine at Guadacanal and my uncle, his older brother, was awarded a Bronze Star for actions at Luzon in the Philippines. An exploding grenade cost him much of his hearing for the rest of his life.
Given your family’s military history, have you ever watched the Pacific? It’s the companion series to Band of Brothers. It’s not quite as good, but still a very powerful watch.
 

Norseland Store

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In the immense entirety of human world history, this was truly one of the greatest, most pivotal moments.

Ordinary people, from all walks of life, were tasked with performing extraordinary feats, knowing full well that the fate of their world was in the balance.

And they came through, unflinchingly. It is simply amazing. Astounding.

I wonder: would we be up to a similar task today?
427AF35D-AC0A-443F-8C68-A9DEF9517687.jpeg
I wouldn’t bet the farm on it
 




KillerGopherFan

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Given your family’s military history, have you ever watched the Pacific? It’s the companion series to Band of Brothers. It’s not quite as good, but still a very powerful watch.
Yes, and I agree. It was hard to match Band of Brothers b/c there were enough survivors able to give perspective on the mini-series as each episode aired. Pacific focused on fewer men, but certainly with really compelling stories.

When I was in Washington DC a few years ago, I spent an entire Sunday afternoon roaming Arlington Cemetery. I located several prominent WWII Marines and soldiers grave sites, one of those being Sgt John Basilone, Congressional Medal of Honor Marine, featured in The Pacific. Also, Ira Hayes, the Native American Iwo Jima flag raiser and Audie Murphy, US Army Congressional Medal of Honoree and later movie star, both whom died much later after the war.

Standing in a field of military tombstones, many of whom were true heroes, with not one person in site as I was off the beaten path, was even more emotionally powerful than my visit to the USS Arizona, which also stirs the emotions b/c of the solemnity and tranquility of both of those memorial sites.
 

golf

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Given your family’s military history, have you ever watched the Pacific? It’s the companion series to Band of Brothers. It’s not quite as good, but still a very powerful watch.

I was struck by the change in tone between the two movies. BoB soldiers presented as much more noble than the Pacific soldiers. This could be caused by hollywood in recent years desiring to portray america more as a villain in or perhaps hollywood just trying to be more realistic. Kinda think it is the former but not sure.
 
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mplarson7

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Along this topic, does anyone here have any recommended history podcasts about World War 2? I've been working my way through Dan Carlin's Supernova in the East about the Pacific theater (very interesting, but a lengthy listen) and would like some recommendations for when I finish this one.
 

boofbonser

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Along this topic, does anyone here have any recommended history podcasts about World War 2? I've been working my way through Dan Carlin's Supernova in the East about the Pacific theater (very interesting, but a lengthy listen) and would like some recommendations for when I finish this one.
I really enjoyed Supernova in the East. Carlin does a good job with combining narrative and analysis. I would suggest you give “the History of WWII podcast” by Ray Harris Jr a try if you are looking specifically for a WWII podcast.
 



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Yes, and I agree. It was hard to match Band of Brothers b/c there were enough survivors able to give perspective on the mini-series as each episode aired. Pacific focused on fewer men, but certainly with really compelling stories.

When I was in Washington DC a few years ago, I spent an entire Sunday afternoon roaming Arlington Cemetery. I located several prominent WWII Marines and soldiers grave sites, one of those being Sgt John Basilone, Congressional Medal of Honor Marine, featured in The Pacific. Also, Ira Hayes, the Native American Iwo Jima flag raiser and Audie Murphy, US Army Congressional Medal of Honoree and later movie star, both whom died much later after the war.

Standing in a field of military tombstones, many of whom were true heroes, with not one person in site as I was off the beaten path, was even more emotionally powerful than my visit to the USS Arizona, which also stirs the emotions b/c of the solemnity and tranquility of both of those memorial sites.
I did not take the tram tour the last time I was there but just wandered around and found Joe Louis grave as well as Lee Marvin and Glenn Miller. I knew Marvin was a marine in WW2 but not that he was a Purple Heart recipient. Miller’s body was never recovered so his daughter petitioned for the placement of a headstone.
In 2004 I was in DC area getting ready to deploy to Iraq and had the opportunity to take in the dedication of the World War 2 memorial. I didn’t get close to the speakers stand, the area was rightly reserved for ww2 vets, but I did get a chance to talk to Bob Dole for about 5 minutes.
 

KillerGopherFan

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I did not take the tram tour the last time I was there but just wandered around and found Joe Louis grave as well as Lee Marvin and Glenn Miller. I knew Marvin was a marine in WW2 but not that he was a Purple Heart recipient. Miller’s body was never recovered so his daughter petitioned for the placement of a headstone.
In 2004 I was in DC area getting ready to deploy to Iraq and had the opportunity to take in the dedication of the World War 2 memorial. I didn’t get close to the speakers stand, the area was rightly reserved for ww2 vets, but I did get a chance to talk to Bob Dole for about 5 minutes.
The year of my dad’s passing (1999), I made a significant contribution to the WWII Memorial in honor of his service. What do you get for a dying man (lung disease from a 2pack/day cigarette smoking habit) for his last birthday? Well, I got the feeling that that was the best gift that I’d ever given anyone. My father was far from a perfect man, but I let him know that I was proud of his service besides giving my love to him as my dad.

If you have relatives, living or that have passed, that served in WWII, I would encourage you to make sure that their service is documented in the WWII Memorial Registry.

Here is a link where you can register your family or acquaintances into the WWII Registry:
 

GopherJake

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I did not take the tram tour the last time I was there but just wandered around and found Joe Louis grave as well as Lee Marvin and Glenn Miller. I knew Marvin was a marine in WW2 but not that he was a Purple Heart recipient. Miller’s body was never recovered so his daughter petitioned for the placement of a headstone.
In 2004 I was in DC area getting ready to deploy to Iraq and had the opportunity to take in the dedication of the World War 2 memorial. I didn’t get close to the speakers stand, the area was rightly reserved for ww2 vets, but I did get a chance to talk to Bob Dole for about 5 minutes.
A sincere thanks for your service.
 

mplarson7

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I really enjoyed Supernova in the East. Carlin does a good job with combining narrative and analysis. I would suggest you give “the History of WWII podcast” by Ray Harris Jr a try if you are looking specifically for a WWII podcast.
I'm generally looking for podcasts on WWI and WWII...we recently discovered there was a distant cousin in the family that fought in WWI, so that spurred my curiosity to delve back into history.
 

STPGopher

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In the immense entirety of human world history, this was truly one of the greatest, most pivotal moments.

Ordinary people, from all walks of life, were tasked with performing extraordinary feats, knowing full well that the fate of their world was in the balance.

And they came through, unflinchingly. It is simply amazing. Astounding.

I wonder: would we be up to a similar task today?
Nonsense you commie liberal...;-)
 

FormerFatOL

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I was struck by the change in tone between the two movies. BoB soldiers presented as much more noble than the Pacific soldiers. This could be caused by hollywood in recent years desiring to portray america more as a villain in or perhaps hollywood just trying to be more realistic. Kinda think it is the former but not sure.

That was the portrayed public perception of the two war theaters. In Europe, soldiers traveled through cheering towns after the fierce fighting was done then fell back for some beer-drinking R&R in friendly rear areas. The German's were highly trained and formidable but Geneva Convention rules were followed (mainly).

The Pacific involved horrendous close combat fighting in nasty jungles located on tiny islands no one heard of. The Japanese and Marines rarely surrendered - usually a fight to the last body. There were no cheering crowds nor beer pubs to be found. Most people never heard of Guadalcanal even though it was one of the the U.S. military's most important historical battles (although the Pacific series no doubt helped that). Would we even know about Iwo Jima if Marine officers didn't recognize a good photo op on Mount Suribachi? Half of the group that raised that flat died within the following days.

I thought the two series portrayed that contrast brilliantly.
 

FormerFatOL

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And BTW, the OP is an insult to veterans across this country.
 

golf

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That was the portrayed public perception of the two war theaters. In Europe, soldiers traveled through cheering towns after the fierce fighting was done then fell back for some beer-drinking R&R in friendly rear areas. The German's were highly trained and formidable but Geneva Convention rules were followed (mainly).

The Pacific involved horrendous close combat fighting in nasty jungles located on tiny islands no one heard of. The Japanese and Marines rarely surrendered - usually a fight to the last body. There were no cheering crowds nor beer pubs to be found. Most people never heard of Guadalcanal even though it was one of the the U.S. military's most important historical battles (although the Pacific series no doubt helped that). Would we even know about Iwo Jima if Marine officers didn't recognize a good photo op on Mount Suribachi? Half of the group that raised that flat died within the following days.

I thought the two series portrayed that contrast brilliantly.

My father in law was an artillery man in the pacific. He got shot but survived. He talked about the exteme bravery of the gi's on the front lines.
 

Go4Broke

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And BTW, the OP is an insult to veterans across this country./

Not all veterans would would be insulted by the very patriotic and historically accurate OP.


Veterans groups decry hatred, racism in wake of neo-Nazi and white supremeacist violence

Veterans groups on Monday forcefully rejected the views of neo-Nazi and white supremacist groups following reports that the Charlottesville extremist who drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters briefly served in the military. A number of prominent veterans groups decried the violence and the rationale behind it, saying that hate speech and discrimination are unacceptable in all forms.

Vietnam Veterans of America president John Rowan issued a statement noting that “if there are any VVA members who harbor any of these bigoted ideologies, they are encouraged to turn in their membership cards. We did not don the uniform and serve our country to enable the acceptance of intolerance. He also said that the hate groups’ “bigoted ideology must be resisted by all true patriots.”

Officials at Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America called the actions of the extremists “detestable,” “cowardly” and “un-American.” “Veterans come from all backgrounds, represent the diversity of America and have stood together against our enemies overseas,” said Paul Rieckhoff, founder and CEO of IAVA. “And we will stand together now against intolerance, hatred and violence here now at home.”

https://www.militarytimes.com/veter...d-racism-in-wake-of-charlottesville-violence/

New ‘wall’ of military veterans protects Portland protesters

A group of military veterans joined protesters in the city for the first time Friday night, standing with their hands clasped behind their backs or holding Black Lives Matter signs, according to a New York Times reporter and others from the scene. “Disabled veterans 4 BLM,” one vet’s sign read.




“I am an American patriot. Federal troops defend property, but this does not give them the right to take away my constitutional freedom,” another sign from a veteran read. Federal officers have been dispatched to the city since July 4, earning criticism for “kidnapping” protesters and tear-gassing crowds that have held demonstrations over the police killing of George Floyd for more than 50 days.

https://nypost.com/2020/07/25/new-wall-of-military-veterans-protect-protesters-in-portland/
 
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KillerGopherFan

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And BTW, the OP is an insult to veterans across this country.
I’d prefer to think that he had a moment of truth rather than an insult b/c of his history here.

Most of his other threads are the insults to our country. Not this one.
 




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