All things Derek Chauvin trial

GoldenRodents

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If you want to reduce crime in a community of humans, intense pressure is required. Successful communities apply that pressure evenly from infancy, by loving mothers and fathers, teachers, coaches. If this fails, subtract the love and hand the problem to the government who will resort to the only leverage they have detention or deadly force.
 

LesBolstad

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Given the evidence presented so far at the Floyd trial, it isn't fair for the judge to complete the trial to a jury verdict. Given the obviousness of the outcome, the jury should not be asked to risk their lives to vote their conscience.
#FreeChauvin
 

Wally

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You could just as easily argue it says a lot about Chauvin's professionalism. He stayed calm & did not get emotional. Just as the police are taught. Even with an angry crowd of people yelling at him & people filming. He stayed cool and followed his training.

He looked like a great hitman....
 


Wally

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If you want to reduce crime in a community of humans, intense pressure is required. Successful communities apply that pressure evenly from infancy, by loving mothers and fathers, teachers, coaches. If this fails, subtract the love and hand the problem to the government who will resort to the only leverage they have detention or deadly force.

You aren't a criminal because of intense pressure?

I think a better predictor is having something to lose. The more people with nothing to lose, the more criminals.
 


Angry

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You're hoping for it it seems.
I’ve already stated that I’m not. It’s my hometown. The problem is the precedent has been set and until consequences are reinstated it will continue.
 


saintpaulguy

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I think they're trying to distance the MPD from this case, which has little to do with the city making a payout to the Floyd family.

If you're an upper echelon member of the MPD, life is going to be a lot easier in this 'defund the police" environment & impending riots, if the MPD does everything possible to claim Chauvin was just a rogue cop who didn't follow policy, & bury him publicly. What's the alternative? They back Chauvin & admit their training techniques led to Floyd's death?

Burying Chauvin publicly is probably a lot better for their careers as well? It's hard to imagine anything up till, or after this case, will define them as much as how they behave now with the national spotlight on them.
So, the police lie when the truth is inconvenient? I’m surprised Eric Nelson hasn’t run with this one.
 

BarnBurner

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So, the police lie when the truth is inconvenient? I’m surprised Eric Nelson hasn’t run with this one.
Just as you protect your hide, shill, Arredondo and company are the same. And making themselves as virtuous as possible.
 



saintpaulguy

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Given the evidence presented so far at the Floyd trial, it isn't fair for the judge to complete the trial to a jury verdict. Given the obviousness of the outcome, the jury should not be asked to risk their lives to vote their conscience.
#FreeChauvin
Put that on bumper sticker for your car.
 

Wally

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Given the evidence presented so far at the Floyd trial, it isn't fair for the judge to complete the trial to a jury verdict. Given the obviousness of the outcome, the jury should not be asked to risk their lives to vote their conscience.
#FreeChauvin

PJ wants you as a guest speaker this spring....

After that they need a tackling dummy.
 

saintpaulguy

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Just as you protect your hide, shill, Arredondo and company are the same. And making themselves as virtuous as possible.
Imagine, Chauvin, the one virtuous officer in a department of liars. Call Eric Nelson now, you’ve got the winning narrative.
 




USAF

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Specifics please.
Testimony resumed with a leading law enforcement practices expert from the Los Angeles Police Department, who told jurors there were clear signs during George Floyd's arrest that should have prompted the now-fired Minneapolis officer to dial down his use of force.
 



Wally

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Imagine, Chauvin, the one virtuous officer in a department of liars. Call Eric Nelson now, you’ve got the winning narrative.

Not that they are liars, but the real truth of the MPD is pliable as it is for everyone.
 

MplsGopher

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That is factually incorrect. Three expert witnesses testified yesterday that Chauvin had his knee on Floyd's shoulder blade.
Expert: Chauvin never took knee off Floyd's neck

Officer Derek Chauvin had his knee on George Floyd’s neck — and was bearing down with most of his weight — the entire time the Black man lay facedown with his hands cuffed behind his back, a use-of-force expert testified Wednesday at Chauvin’s murder trial.

Jody Stiger, a Los Angeles Police Department sergeant serving as a prosecution witness, said that based on his review of video evidence, Chauvin’s knee was on Floyd’s neck from the time officers put Floyd on the ground until paramedics arrived — about 9 1/2 minutes, by prosecutors’ reckoning.

Prosecutor Steve Schleicher showed jurors a composite image of five photos taken from various videos of the arrest. Stiger went through each photo, saying it appeared that the Minneapolis officer’s left knee was on Floyd’s neck or neck area in each one.
 


MplsGopher

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He stayed calm & did not get emotional.
Why would he? He didn't think what he was doing was going to kill him.

As has been correctly stated time and again: intent is not needed for 3rd degree murder in MN.

Hence why he already agreed to plea guilty to that.
 



MplsGopher

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I'll ask again, even though I know I won't get an (honest) answer:

- say a person has just purposefully ingested a lethal dose of drugs (either to commit suicide or to conceal evidence of a crime)
- should it now be legal to commit homicide against that person, before they would have died from the dose?


Any takers?
 

short ornery norwegian

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Found this online on 2nd-degree murder:

Second-degree murder is generally either:
  • An unplanned, intentional killing (reacting in the heat of the moment when angry)
  • A death caused by a reckless disregard for human life
The Difference Between First and Second-Degree Murder

Putting aside felony murder, the real difference between first and second-degree murder is the intent or mindset the defendant had when they took the action they did.


so Chauvin did not have to have the intent to kill Floyd. If Floyd's death was caused by a reckless disregard for human life (such as a police officer not following the department's stated policy on use of force), then it meets the standard for 2nd-Degree murder.
 


MplsGopher

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Found this online on 2nd-degree murder:

Second-degree murder is generally either:
  • An unplanned, intentional killing (reacting in the heat of the moment when angry)
  • A death caused by a reckless disregard for human life
The Difference Between First and Second-Degree Murder

Putting aside felony murder, the real difference between first and second-degree murder is the intent or mindset the defendant had when they took the action they did.


so Chauvin did not have to have the intent to kill Floyd. If Floyd's death was caused by a reckless disregard for human life (such as a police officer not following the department's stated policy on use of force), then it meets the standard for 2nd-Degree murder.
Or ..... you can just go by the actual Minnesota state laws.

2nd degree requires intent, 3rd degree does not.
 

Nax5

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Given the evidence presented so far at the Floyd trial, it isn't fair for the judge to complete the trial to a jury verdict. Given the obviousness of the outcome, the jury should not be asked to risk their lives to vote their conscience.
#FreeChauvin
#BlackLivesMatter
 
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