All Things COVID-19 College Football Impact

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
15,936
Reaction score
2,536
Points
113
No, of course it doesn't.

It just looks weird to the rubes on here. Because Minnesota is such a far-flung, and highly provincial fanbase. It's not normal for "outsiders" to want to be fans of the Gophers, so they're immediately looked at with suspicion.
 

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
15,936
Reaction score
2,536
Points
113
I’m not sure you understand how clinical research works. The vast majority of original clinical research is led by MDs who have had training and experience in research. Based on your message above your impression is that MDs’ only contribution is “administering the protocol” and prescribing medicine. Of course, most research these days is sufficiently complex to require collaboration including PhD scientists, biostatisticians etc.
Right ... science is complex. Hence the need for scientists.

Doctors prescribe medicine. That's why they take the time to memorize giant lookup tables of organic chemistry. That's what a doctor is.

Diagnosis is an art. It can't really be taught. You just have to try to practice it, and get better at recognizing things when you see them.


I’m not going to look for your reply about Dr. Fauci in the other thread but it seems you’re implying that he merely summarizes what PhD scientists have done, that he has never done original research?
"Has done", means what? That really applies to your whole post, and your whole frame of reference.

If scientists and engineers develop a new medical device -- design algorithms for tuning it, design the device leads, design the case, etc. -- and they collaborate with a doctor to run a study, to have the device installed and to provide care to the participants ...... did the doctor "do science", in your opinion? In my opinion, no they did not. Hence, the need for scientists (and engineers).

Thanks for the Minnesotan passive aggressive “That was your choice, whether it was because you didn't think you were competent enough in science to go that route, or more likely because you didn't want to put the time in.” Classic!
Any time!

Question: if you're so interested in science and research ... why didn't you put in the time to get a PhD?

Another question: if a scientist has worked for 20 years in medical research, but has no MD, do you think they should be allowed to prescribe medicine?
 

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
15,936
Reaction score
2,536
Points
113
In the vein of proving that I am not a total hack, I present the following. The (mainly cited?) co-author of the Ohio State study, basically says that his original intent for doing the study, and the way he assumed and hoped the results would be interpreted, was nothing more than as a means for getting players back on the field. NOT the opposite, which has been the popular interpretation.

https://www.buckeyextra.com/sports/...tudy-says-itrsquos-no-reason-to-cancel-sports

Borchers couldn’t be reached for comment, but another co-author of the study, Ohio State cardiologist Dr. Curt Daniels, told The Dispatch that he believes interpretations of the results and the risk of myocarditis have been widely misconstrued.

Daniels said he believes the study should be used as evidence for a responsible return to athletic competition, not as a reason to pull the plug on the season. The Big Ten had not announced a decision Monday night.

“I think we have a safe way to return to play,” Daniels said. “I hope that we will find a way to do so.”

The OSU study used cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), which is a much more sensitive test than the echocardiogram and EKG typically used to test for myocarditis. Daniels was dismayed that the four positive cases dominated the headlines and the discussion instead of the findings that 22 showed no signs of the disease – and perhaps more important, a way to identify who may be susceptible to myocarditis.

″‘My gosh, they found myocarditis, there’s no way we can play,’ ” Daniels said of the general reaction. “They’re putting it out there saying it’s not safe to play. They’re not reading the article. Or if they’re reading it, they’re just putting their own spin on it, like, ‘It’s not safe.’

“It’s actually the opposite. We’re saying we actually found this, but we know a path now to say it’s safe to go back as opposed to having this uncomfortable feeling of not knowing anything” about the actual risk.
 

alchemy2u

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
4,413
Reaction score
588
Points
113
SEC claimed they had it all under control and that they knew how to protect the players.

Texas Tech reports 75 football players have gotten Covid-19, LSU coach says that most his football players have caught it. many other teams will not report how many players have gotten Covid-19.

Obviously, they did not know how to protect the players or didn't care to try.
 

LesBolstad

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
4,853
Reaction score
699
Points
113
SEC claimed they had it all under control and that they knew how to protect the players.

Texas Tech reports 75 football players have gotten Covid-19, LSU coach says that most his football players have caught it. many other teams will not report how many players have gotten Covid-19.

Obviously, they did not know how to protect the players or didn't care to try.
Anyone get sick? Hospitalized? Die?
 

SelectionSunday

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 12, 2008
Messages
22,315
Reaction score
454
Points
83
SEC claimed they had it all under control and that they knew how to protect the players.

Texas Tech reports 75 football players have gotten Covid-19, LSU coach says that most his football players have caught it. many other teams will not report how many players have gotten Covid-19.

Obviously, they did not know how to protect the players or didn't care to try.
Hey dipstick, Texas Tech is in the Big XII.
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
97
Reaction score
56
Points
18
SEC claimed they had it all under control and that they knew how to protect the players.

Texas Tech reports 75 football players have gotten Covid-19, LSU coach says that most his football players have caught it. many other teams will not report how many players have gotten Covid-19.

Obviously, they did not know how to protect the players or didn't care to try.
smart . play the fricking game.
 

SelectionSunday

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 12, 2008
Messages
22,315
Reaction score
454
Points
83
]
Is calling someone a “dipstick” necessary? Seriously, what is wrong with civility?
Stan, civility left GopherHole a long time ago, and now the lack of it has crept over from the Off Topic board.

Point taken, I’ll try to be better, but can only stomach some of the drivel from GH’s Corona Brothers for so long.
 

Cedar Rapids Gopher

Active member
Joined
Jan 7, 2020
Messages
225
Reaction score
117
Points
43
]
Stan, civility left GopherHole a long time ago, and now the lack of it has crept over from the Off Topic board.

Point taken, I’ll try to be better, but can only stomach some of the drivel from GH’s Corona Brothers for so long.
I think has gotten really bad durring Covid. I don't care what side anyone's on the politics board have gotten terrible.
 

Stan

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
3,618
Reaction score
199
Points
63
]
Stan, civility left GopherHole a long time ago, and now the lack of it has crept over from the Off Topic board.

Point taken, I’ll try to be better, but can only stomach some of the drivel from GH’s Corona Brothers for so long.
Its 100x worse on Twitter.

What’s a “Corona Brother” I’ve seen you refer to college basketball reporters as such too.
Listen, I don’t agree with some who are scared of their shadow with Covid. I’m living my life and being mindful of others. But I’m also not calling people dipstick for having a different opinion than me or for mistakenly saying Texas Tech is SEC.

You’re a great poster, I always seek yours out. I don’t want you to become a name caller.
 

bc2211

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2013
Messages
1,200
Reaction score
143
Points
63
I enjoy the occasional moments when I read a sports opinion, think ‘yeah, i agree with that a lot’, and then see it’s someone who I otherwise disagree with on corona or political stuff (mind you I avoid the OT board like the plague).

The continuing insults do sour those moments, though. The covid drama on here may drive me into retirement after a solid 9 (?) year run.
 

Iceland12

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 12, 2008
Messages
20,535
Reaction score
52
Points
48
"Not all of our players, but most of our players have caught it," Orgeron told reporters. "I think that hopefully they won't catch it again, and hopefully they're not out for games."

Asked later for further clarification, Orgeron said he didn't know the exact percentage of players who have had the coronavirus.

"Hopefully that once you catch it, you don't get it again," he said. "I'm not a doctor. I think they have that 90-day window, so most of the players that have caught it, we do feel like they'll be eligible for games."..

Orgeron's comments come on the heels of Texas Tech self-reporting five more cases of COVID-19 on Monday, bringing the team's total number of positive cases to 75 since players returned to campus in June...


 

GopherFanatic19

Active member
Joined
Sep 11, 2010
Messages
807
Reaction score
99
Points
28
Doesn’t sound like it, at least I haven’t seen any reported sick or hospitalized with these teams.
there was no need to google it for your answer. If a player was, the hypemachine media would be blasting that the player was hospitalized and or died of it.

ThE scamdemic has moved on from hospitalized and deaths to positive only tests as deaths have dropped dramatically. Who cares if 10,000 people get it and Recover. Open up and play football
 

Pompous Elitist

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 18, 2013
Messages
15,572
Reaction score
1,465
Points
113
Letter Warns Against Clinical Role for Cardiac MRI in Asymptomatic COVID Patients


The publication of several studies using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging raised public fears over increased risk to the heart in patients following infection with COVID-19. A group of physicians wrote the following letter warning against the use of CMRI in asymptomatic people following infection.



September 9, 2020

To: American College of Cardiology
American College of Chest Physicians
American College of Physicians
American College of Radiology
American Heart Association
American Society of Echocardiography
American Thoracic Society
European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging
European Society of Cardiology
European Society of Radiology
Heart Rhythm Society
Infectious Disease Society of America
North American Society of Cardiovascular Imaging
Radiologic Society of North America
Society of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
Society of Critical Care Medicine
Society of General Internal Medicine
Society of Hospital Medicine

Dear Society Leadership:

We are a group of clinicians, researchers and imaging specialists writing in response to recent publications and media coverage about myocarditis after COVID-19. We work in different areas such as public health, internal medicine, cardiology, and radiology, across the globe, but are similarly concerned about the presentation, interpretation and media coverage of the role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the management of asymptomatic patients recovered from COVID-19.

Studies123 investigating the prevalence of myocarditis in patients with recent COVID-19 have found features of subclinical myocarditis on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in patients without symptoms. Some commentators have raised concern that COVID-19 may lead to frequent, serious long-term cardiac sequelae even among people who have had mild infection and are currently asymptomatic.

We wish to emphasize that the prevalence, clinical significance and long-term implications of CMR surrogates of myocardial injury on morbidity and mortality are unknown. Further, it is unclear if the elevated T1 and T2 flagged in these studies are clinically significant, particularly in isolation, if treatment is needed, and, if so, what the management should be. These important questions should inspire future prospective studies.

Nonetheless, these reports have attracted significant media coverage, at times amplified by speculation on possible clinical implications, thus generating substantial anxiety amongst members of the general public. As a result, we are aware that some individuals are seeking CMR testing despite the absence of cardiac symptoms. We believe that, given the preliminary nature and limitations of the current evidence, testing asymptomatic members of the general public after COVID-19 is not indicated outside of carefully planned and approved research studies with appropriate control groups.

In light of your societies’ standing in the community and advocacy against low-yield testing and low-value medical care through your sponsorship of the Choosing Wisely4, Image Wisely5, and other similar campaigns, we request that you offer clear guidance discouraging CMR screening for COVID-19 related heart abnormalities in asymptomatic members of the general public.

Sincerely,

Venkatesh L. Murthy, MD, PhD, FACC, FAHA Rubenfire Professor of Preventive Cardiology Division of Cardiovascular Medicine University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI USA

Daniel J Morgan MD, MS, FIDSA, FSHEA, Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health and Infectious Diseases University of Maryland School of Medicine, Chief Hospital Epidemiologist, VA Maryland Healthcare System Baltimore, Maryland USA

Vinay Prasad MD MPH, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, USA

Edward J. Schloss, MD, FHRS, Division Chief, Cardiac Electrophysiology, The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH USA

Stephen A. McCullough, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Weill Cornell Medicine / NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY USA

Christos Argyropoulos, MD, PhD, FASN, Division Chief, Nephrology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM USA

Ibrahim Halil Tanboga, MD, PhD, Professor of Cardiology and Biostatistician, Nisantasi University & Hisar Intercontinental Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Istanbul Ataturk University, Medical School, Department of Biostatistics, Erzurum, Turkey

David L. Brown, MD, Professor of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO USA

Ritu Thamman MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA USA

Zainab Samad, MBBS, MHS, Professor of Medicine,, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan

John Mandrola, MD, Cardiac Electrophysiologist, Baptist Health Louisville, Louisville, KY USA

Ethan J. Weiss, M.D. UCSF, San Francisco, CA USA

Rohin Francis, MBBS, Cardiology specialist trainee, Essex Cardiothoracic Centre, Basildon, UK

Rory Hachamovitch, MD, MSc, FACC, MASNC, Staff Cardiologist, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH USA

Jeremy B Sussman, Associate Professor Of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI USA

Marcio Sommer Bittencourt MD, MPH, PhD, FACC, FESC, FAHA, Staff Cardiologist, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital – University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo – Brazil

David J. Cohen, MD MSc, Professor of Medicine, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO USA

Joshua E. Levenson, MD FACC, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Heart and Vascular Institute, Pittsburgh, PA USA

Benoy N Shah,MD FRCP FESC, Consultant Cardiologist, Southampton General Hospital, UK, President, British Heart Valve Society

Fernando G Zampieri, MD, PhD, Intensivist, Research Coordinator, HCor Research Institute, São Paulo, Brazil

Leticia Kawano-Dourado, MD, PhD, Respiratory medicine physician and researcher, HCor Research Institute, São Paulo, Brazil, Pulmonary Division, Heart Institute (InCor), Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; INSERM UMR 1152 – University of Paris Diderot, Paris, France

João L. Cavalcante, MD, FACC, FSCMR, Imaging Cardiologist and Director of Cardiac MRI and Structural CT Labs, Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, MN, USA

Florian Zores, MD, Cardiologist, Specialized Medical Center & Ellipse Center, Strasbourg, France

Adam Cifu, MD, Professor of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago Il, USA

Ash Paul MPH, FFPH, Consultant in Public Health, NHS South West London CCG, London SW19 1RH UK

Ashish Aneja MD FACC FASE FSCMR, Staff Cardiologist, Associate Professor of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, OH USA

David R. Tomlinson BM BSc MD, Consultant Cardiologist and Electrophysiologist and MedRxiv Affiliate, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK USA

Michael E. Johansen MD MS, Assistant Residency Director, Grant Family Medicine, Columbus, OH USA

Joseph Selvanayagam MBBS (Hons) FRACP DPhil FESC FSCMR, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, Flinders University, Senior Consultant Cardiologist, Director of Imaging, Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, Australia

Brett W. Sperry, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Missouri – Kansas City, Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO USA

Martin Ugander MD PhD, Professor of Cardiac Imaging, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

Jason H. Wasfy, MD MPhil, Director, Outcomes Research, Massachusetts General Hospital Heart Center, Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts USA

Constantine Raptis, MD, Director of Thoracic MRI and Co-Director of Emergency Radiology, Associate Professor of Diagnostic Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, St. Louis, MO USA

Eric Strong, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA USA

Leon Menezes, BA BM BCh FRCR FRCP, Consultant Radiologist & Nuclear Medicine Physician, UCL Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Barts Heart Centre, London UK, Lead Nuclear Cardiology UCL Partners

Will Watson, MB BChir, Specialist Registrar in Cardiology, Oxford, United Kingdom

Edward J. Miller, MD PhD, FASNC, FACC, Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Radiology & Biomedical Imaging ,Director, Nuclear Cardiology, Director, Cardiology Fellowship Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT USA

Marc R Dweck MD PhD FRCP FACC, Professor of Clinical Cardiology, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Evelyn M Horn MD, Director Advanced Heart Failure and Pulmonary Vascular Disease, Professor of Clinical Cardiology, Weill Cornell Medicine

Saurabh Jha MBBS MRCS MS, Associate Professor of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania

Juan C. Lopez-Mattei, MD, FACC, FASE, FSCCT, FSCMR, Associate Professor, Department of Cardiology, Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Co-Director, MD Anderson Cardiac Radiology Services, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dorian L, Beasley, MD, FACC, General and Interventional Cardiology, Indianapolis, Indiana

Erik Schelbert, MD, MS, FACC, Director, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Bogdan Enache MD, Cardiologist, Princess Grace Hospital, Monaco

David Nunan PhD, Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Brahmajee Nallamothu, MD, MPH, Professor of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School – Ann Arbor

Yiannis S. Chatzizisis, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine, Physiology and Engineering, Chief, Interventional Cardiology Section, Director, Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Director, Heart and Vascular Unit, Director, Cardiovascular Biology and Biomechanics Laboratory, Cardiovascular Division, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA

Raj Mehta, MD, Family Medicine & Clinical Informatics, Assistant Program Director, Family Medicine Residency AdventHealth, Winterpark, FL USA

Saurabh Malhotra MD MPH FACC FASNC, Imaging Cardiologist, Director of Advanced Cardiac Imaging and Cardiac Stress Testing Laboratory, Division of Cardiology, Cook County Health, Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiology), Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL, USA

Shelby Kutty, MD, PhD, MHCM, The Helen B. Taussig Professor, Director, Pediatric and Congenital Cardiology, Co-Director, Blalock Taussig Thomas Heart Center Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Ali N Zaidi, MD, Director, Mount Sinai Adult Congenital Heart Disease Center, Director, Academic Affairs, Childrens Heart Center, Kravis Children’s Hospital, Associate Professor, Medicine and Pediatrics Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY

Pamela K. Woodard, MD, FACR, FAHA, FCCP, FSCMR, FNASCI, Hugh Monroe Wilson Professor of Radiology, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Sr. Vice Chair, Radiology Research Facilities, Director, Cardiac MRI/CT, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA

 

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
15,936
Reaction score
2,536
Points
113
I think he was referencing LSU. Looks like Covid broke through the LSU and Texas Tech player "bubbles" without too much trouble.
Hahaha.

It "broke through" the LSU bubble very early in the summer. My wild guess is the players (possibly with the blessing of coaches??) organized to get everyone infected early, so it wouldn't happen during the season.

Sad thing is, some will say that was "smart".
 

MplsGopher

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
15,936
Reaction score
2,536
Points
113
Letter Warns Against Clinical Role for Cardiac MRI in Asymptomatic COVID Patients
American public should immediately be questioning this and trying to figure out what the actual agenda is that is driving this.

I wonder whom will suffer the greatest consequences of this cadre trying to shout down scientific progress, in the name of who knows what? Protecting the status quo? Preventing too many dollars from leaving certain pockets, too fast?

Maybe you can fill us in on those details, that aren't included in the Tweets?
 

GoldenRodents

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
1,635
Reaction score
321
Points
83
Hahaha.

It "broke through" the LSU bubble very early in the summer. My wild guess is the players (possibly with the blessing of coaches??) organized to get everyone infected early, so it wouldn't happen during the season.

Sad thing is, some will say that was "smart".
It was smart
 

Pompous Elitist

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 18, 2013
Messages
15,572
Reaction score
1,465
Points
113
American public should immediately be questioning this and trying to figure out what the actual agenda is that is driving this.

I wonder whom will suffer the greatest consequences of this cadre trying to shout down scientific progress, in the name of who knows what? Protecting the status quo? Preventing too many dollars from leaving certain pockets, too fast?

Maybe you can fill us in on those details, that aren't included in the Tweets?
The letter above is for those posters that don’t like their medical advice coming from Twitter.
 
Top Bottom