All Things COVID-19 College Football Impact

Ogee Oglethorpe

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Terrible news, best of luck to the young man as he goes through this fight.

Fortunately for him, because he was on campus in the athletic facilities he was able to not only get diagnosed very quickly but also had access to medical resources available to him through the university and football team. Sounds like the system in place worked exactly like it was set up; kudos to George State for doing everything they can for their student athletes!
 

MGGopher

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Bummer for him. Not the first, won't be the last. Regardless of where a a person picks up the virus -- practice, game, dorm, caf, hometown, party -- sounds like the chance of cardiac complications will continue to be a story line for athletes. Add it to the ever growing list of things that scientists and other professionals are trying to understand when it comes to COVID-19.
 

#2Gopher

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Clearly won't be the last person to have to deal with this. Doesn't this open people's eyes as to what is going on? It was a blessing that he was on campus as he will get good and better care than most people with poor insurance, high deductibles, the run around in our current health care system, and not a good support team.
 

Block M

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High-end athletes hoping to have professional careers should be very wary to get on a football field, team bus, huddle etc etc. until the vaccine is out. Just too much risk. Hopefully by January we will begin to turn the corner.
 

Ogee Oglethorpe

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High-end athletes hoping to have professional careers should be very wary to get on a football field, team bus, huddle etc etc. until the vaccine is out. Just too much risk. Hopefully by January we will begin to turn the corner.
?????? I'm not sure I understand this statement whatsoever? Clearly, in the case of this young man, he was infinitely better off being in football activities than he would have been were he at home or who knows where. If anything, this case illustrates crystal clearly why these student athletes should be on campus, with their team, with their medical staffs, best equipped to handle anything like this that may arise.

I have no doubt that this young man is eternally grateful that's exactly where he was, he basically said so in his statement. Truly a blessing for him to get on this and get on it early and with the help he had available to him
 

upnorthkid

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?????? I'm not sure I understand this statement whatsoever? Clearly, in the case of this young man, he was infinitely better off being in football activities than he would have been were he at home or who knows where. If anything, this case illustrates crystal clearly why these student athletes should be on campus, with their team, with their medical staffs, best equipped to handle anything like this that may arise.

I have no doubt that this young man is eternally grateful that's exactly where he was, he basically said so in his statement. Truly a blessing for him to get on this and get on it early and with the help he had available to him
I think what he is saying is practicing and playing games is not necessary to continue to provide these kids access to medical care and facilities. If he's not, then I have no idea where he's going with this.
 

SelectionSunday

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Terrible news, best of luck to the young man as he goes through this fight.

Fortunately for him, because he was on campus in the athletic facilities he was able to not only get diagnosed very quickly but also had access to medical resources available to him through the university and football team. Sounds like the system in place worked exactly like it was set up; kudos to George State for doing everything they can for their student athletes!
Yep, it worked exactly like it was supposed to.
 

WriterGoph

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?????? I'm not sure I understand this statement whatsoever? Clearly, in the case of this young man, he was infinitely better off being in football activities than he would have been were he at home or who knows where. If anything, this case illustrates crystal clearly why these student athletes should be on campus, with their team, with their medical staffs, best equipped to handle anything like this that may arise.

I have no doubt that this young man is eternally grateful that's exactly where he was, he basically said so in his statement. Truly a blessing for him to get on this and get on it early and with the help he had available to him
There is a HUGE difference between being on campus and having access to medical staff and full contact practice/playing games/traveling between states. I don't think anyone on GH is arguing that we should send all these athletes home to be on their own.
 

short ornery norwegian

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I think the question being raised was when or where the player was infected.

If he was infected as a direct result of participating in team activities, then one could argue that he might have been better off at home.

As far as the level of care received, I don't you if you can assume that he got better care on-campus that he would have at home. that would depend on the family's insurance situation, proximity to medical care, etc.
 

Section209

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?????? I'm not sure I understand this statement whatsoever? Clearly, in the case of this young man, he was infinitely better off being in football activities than he would have been were he at home or who knows where. If anything, this case illustrates crystal clearly why these student athletes should be on campus, with their team, with their medical staffs, best equipped to handle anything like this that may arise.
My take on his comment is this.... there's a prominent view, as seen often on this board as well, that there's no reason to cancel or postpone the football season. The argument made is that this is not really a risk to these young healthy guys and anyone who thinks football is a risk is just a nancy over-reactor. I think he's making the point that there's more to this virus than many suspect and there is, in fact, a risk to these guys. Risks that could potentially not only end their football careers and professional prospects, but also impact the rest of their lives.

Players may get better care in a team provided health environment (that may be true for some and not for others). But that doesn't necessarily justify the risk of exposure inherent in the game.

Some here will say, "See, the system worked and caught it. All the more reason to push forward with a football season."

Other side to that coin is, "See, there are more risks than previously thought and we shouldn't risk exposing these kids in a very close nose-to-nose game with high possibility of exposure."
 

Lakeville Goldy

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I think the question being raised was when or where the player was infected.

If he was infected as a direct result of participating in team activities, then one could argue that he might have been better off at home.

As far as the level of care received, I don't you if you can assume that he got better care on-campus that he would have at home. that would depend on the family's insurance situation, proximity to medical care, etc.
Yeah, even if the student is dirt poor (might be richer than Scrooge McDuck for all I know) there's no saying his treatment might not have been as good or better elsewhere. I don't think HCMC is giving crappy treatment based on economic status, for example.

Everyone just assumes these players live in an outhouse in BFE that is 1000 miles from adequate health care. The reality is the vast majority of student athletes live relatively close to pretty good (at worst) health care. Some better than others, certainly. But the vast majority of players could get treated at home just as well as at a University.
 

A_Slab_of_Bacon

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I think the question being raised was when or where the player was infected.

If he was infected as a direct result of participating in team activities, then one could argue that he might have been better off at home.

As far as the level of care received, I don't you if you can assume that he got better care on-campus that he would have at home. that would depend on the family's insurance situation, proximity to medical care, etc.
And a bit more connected to schools.

Do we want to be the ones who exposed them / their teammates because we chose to have them play football?

Like it's possible they're exposed other ways because of their choices, but schools have to decide what their risk / responsiblity is.
 

Nokomis

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Terrible news, best of luck to the young man as he goes through this fight.

Fortunately for him, because he was on campus in the athletic facilities he was able to not only get diagnosed very quickly but also had access to medical resources available to him through the university and football team. Sounds like the system in place worked exactly like it was set up; kudos to George State for doing everything they can for their student athletes!
I get what you're trying to say here, but the point of cancelling the season is to reduce the risk of a student-athlete getting a serious heart-condition from Covid. No reason he couldn't get the same care if the season's cancelled.
 

LesBolstad

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Sounds as tho the heart condition was pre-existing and found during an exam post a positive China Flu result. The infection now may have saved his life down the line.
 

Ogee Oglethorpe

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I get what you're trying to say here, but the point of cancelling the season is to reduce the risk of a student-athlete getting a serious heart-condition from Covid. No reason he couldn't get the same care if the season's cancelled.
Are we really reducing the risk? How can you say that for sure? How do you know that by not participating you are not increasing your level of risk? You don't know that, you can't know that, and it's disingenuous to say that you DO know that.

This argument is like saying, on Monday you went to the grocery store and the post office; on Tuesday you went to the grocery store, the post office and the bank and on Thursday you were diagnosed positive, THEREFORE I must have gotten it at the bank. Not very well stated but you get the point. Is it possible? Sure. Do you KNOW that? Of course not

It's everywhere and it's going to be everywhere for a long time. To arbitrarily say that they are safer in these places than they are in other places is just plain ridiculous
 

Nokomis

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Are we really reducing the risk? How can you say that for sure? How do you know that by not participating you are not increasing your level of risk? You don't know that, you can't know that, and it's disingenuous to say that you DO know that.

This argument is like saying, on Monday you went to the grocery store and the post office; on Tuesday you went to the grocery store, the post office and the bank and on Thursday you were diagnosed positive, THEREFORE I must have gotten it at the bank. Not very well stated but you get the point. Is it possible? Sure. Do you KNOW that? Of course not

It's everywhere and it's going to be everywhere for a long time. To arbitrarily say that they are safer in these places than they are in other places is just plain ridiculous
I imagine the locker room is the highest risk area for these athletes. That's why some health clubs are open but not the locker rooms. Yes, it's everywhere, but certain areas are higher risk than others. This recommendation comes from health experts so isn't entirely arbitrary. I've seen this handy chart circulated on social media. For football players, you're combining working out at a gym, playing football, and going to a sports stadium into their weekly routine -- compounding risk instead of reducing.

1597954757845.png
 

Block M

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Sounds as tho the heart condition was pre-existing and found during an exam post a positive China Flu result. The infection now may have saved his life down the line.
How do you infer this from the statement? My interpretation is that he has developed myocarditis after being infected with SARS-CoV2. The China Flu thing is really small.
 

LesBolstad

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How do you infer this from the statement? My interpretation is that he has developed myocarditis after being infected with SARS-CoV2. The China Flu thing is really small.
You're small.

Where do you infer myocarditis as a direct result of China Flu?
 

Block M

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WhoFellDownTheGopherHole?

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Sounds as tho the heart condition was pre-existing and found during an exam post a positive China Flu result. The infection now may have saved his life down the line.
There are several articles already in press that specifically mention this as being caused by the Covid infection.
 

LesBolstad

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There are several articles already in press that specifically mention this as being caused by the Covid infection.
Hmm, what I found from most recent info:

"Colasurdo didn't specify which heart condition... ultimately it was the procedures and tests set forth by GSU that allowed the doctors to find this condition in my heart and help keep me safe"

Could be Chine Flu related but I'm skeptical. Could be just more #VirusPorn.
 

Bernie Bro

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Myocarditis is fairly rare, but can be brought on by nearly any viral infection, including the common cold. Prognosis for a full recovery is generally very good, particularly in healthy young adults, so this young man will be just fine. The fact remains that COVID is about as dangerous to this age group as the flu.
 

alchemy2u

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?????? I'm not sure I understand this statement whatsoever? Clearly, in the case of this young man, he was infinitely better off being in football activities than he would have been were he at home or who knows where. If anything, this case illustrates crystal clearly why these student athletes should be on campus, with their team, with their medical staffs, best equipped to handle anything like this that may arise.

I have no doubt that this young man is eternally grateful that's exactly where he was, he basically said so in his statement. Truly a blessing for him to get on this and get on it early and with the help he had available to him
Please do a little research on why conditions such as Myocarditis is much more of a problem for an elite athlete engaged in strenuous workouts.

Covid is not the flu, there are numerous studies that show it affects the heart of many of the people who are infected.

Here is just one article that shows that "recovering" from Covid does not mean you are back to normal. It is not political, it is science.

https://www.statnews.com/2020/07/27/covid19-concerns-about-lasting-heart-damage/
 

alchemy2u

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Myocarditis is fairly rare, but can be brought on by nearly any viral infection, including the common cold. Prognosis for a full recovery is generally very good, particularly in healthy young adults, so this young man will be just fine. The fact remains that COVID is about as dangerous to this age group as the flu.
Please, stop making such ignorant claims that have no basis in the truth.
 

Ogee Oglethorpe

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Please do a little research on why conditions such as Myocarditis is much more of a problem for an elite athlete engaged in strenuous workouts.

Covid is not the flu, there are numerous studies that show it affects the heart of many of the people who are infected.

Here is just one article that shows that "recovering" from Covid does not mean you are back to normal. It is not political, it is science.

https://www.statnews.com/2020/07/27/covid19-concerns-about-lasting-heart-damage/
Uhhh, I think you may have been responding to a different post here? Just a guess
 

highwayman

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Please do a little research on why conditions such as Myocarditis is much more of a problem for an elite athlete engaged in strenuous workouts.

Covid is not the flu, there are numerous studies that show it affects the heart of many of the people who are infected.

Here is just one article that shows that "recovering" from Covid does not mean you are back to normal. It is not political, it is science.

https://www.statnews.com/2020/07/27/covid19-concerns-about-lasting-heart-damage/
Interesting, but likely is not a valid “study”. The implication is that they did a full heart scan or imaging the minute they were admitted. Highly, highly unlikely. There isn’t time, and there isn’t a reason. If the baseline isn’t set upon initial admittance, it isn’t a baseline.

More likely, they did a scan upon recovery, and then guessed at what their heart was like before. Not good science. Pandering science.
 

LakerFan

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Please do a little research on why conditions such as Myocarditis is much more of a problem for an elite athlete engaged in strenuous workouts.

Covid is not the flu, there are numerous studies that show it affects the heart of many of the people who are infected.

Here is just one article that shows that "recovering" from Covid does not mean you are back to normal. It is not political, it is science.

https://www.statnews.com/2020/07/27/covid19-concerns-about-lasting-heart-damage/
from your article

“The question now is how long these changes persist,” he added. “Are these going to become chronic effects upon the heart or are these — we hope — temporary effects on cardiac function that will gradually improve over time?”

press hold on the panic button. Too early to say if these are normal respiratory virus after effects, of which myocarditis is one, that clear up over time as they have in most respiratory virus aftermaths. Certainly it is no joke to the player involved and sitting out a season is a reasonable precaution. Hopefully he is back in good health next year when we might actually play football.
 

MplsGopher

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There is a HUGE difference between being on campus and having access to medical staff and full contact practice/playing games/traveling between states. I don't think anyone on GH is arguing that we should send all these athletes home to be on their own.
If they're going to be quarantining at their parents house, that would be the safest place they can be.

If they're going to go out and party at friends' houses, that's their own poor decision making and will reflect on them for NFL teams.
 
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