All Things COVID-19 College Football Impact

Taji34

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If that's the case then why is there even a discussion about whether football can be played and if fans can go to the games? Mandate that fans wear masks and we should be good to go.
They cover that too in the article. Saying outside games to add some protection if everyone is wearing masks. The question that scientists say they don't have an exact answer to is how fans being packed in concourses and bathrooms effects the chances of transmission. The current thought is it would increase the possibility. They also mention that some stadiums greatly block the wind and sun, which is widely thought to be what helped protests have limited spread.

And I am with you on a mask mandate! The fact of the matter is enforcing that, and the broad push back in the nation against mask mandates. Mask use has been politicized, and we all know the sh*t show that happens when sports and politics mix.
 

Taji34

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Sure, all those in the MOBS that rioted, assaulted, stole and destroyed were wearing masks..... OK

The masks are a joke.

Watch the videos, even among the peaceful SJW/ snowflakes the mask wearing is spotty, and in most cases (like in the general population) people are just pretending to actually have a mask on, as they constantly move it around and touch their faces, pull it down to talk and pull it below their nose as i usually do to avoid the heat and nastiness on the rare occasion I wear a mask.

Masks are 100 percent virtue signaling and not much more, as currently implemented. Nurses and Doctors know how to utilize masks, the rest of us not so much. .... All for show
I was at many protests here in Seattle, and mask usage was near 100%, in addition to people handing out masks to those who weren't wearing them. While I can't speak to everywhere in the US, I find it hard to believe Seattle would be an anomaly.

And I repeat the numbers do not show an increase in cases related to the protests.
 

GopherGuy8

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They cover that too in the article. Saying outside games to add some protection if everyone is wearing masks. The question that scientists say they don't have an exact answer to is how fans being packed in concourses and bathrooms effects the chances of transmission. The current thought is it would increase the possibility. They also mention that some stadiums greatly block the wind and sun, which is widely thought to be what helped protests have limited spread.

And I am with you on a mask mandate! The fact of the matter is enforcing that, and the broad push back in the nation against mask mandates. Mask use has been politicized, and we all know the sh*t show that happens when sports and politics mix.
If they mandate masks and only allow 30-50% capacity idk how different the stadium would really be from say a packed Costco or similar store.

Bolded = The Truth
 

PMWinSTP

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If that's the case then why is there even a discussion about whether football can be played and if fans can go to the games? Mandate that fans wear masks and we should be good to go.
So you didn't read the article...
 

RememberMurray

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No, continue protections for the vulnerable while achieving herd immunity as fast as possible.

You simply can't spend the equivalent of a couple Iraq wars every time there is a virus the kills the medically fragile while sparing the healthy and young.

We are almost there. This thing will be gone by September.
Sorry. I really don't mean to belittle your opinion, because it is every bit as viable as mine is; but regarding the bolded part of your post, I think you're delusional.

That said, I fervently hope you're right and I'm dead wrong. I want my world back the way it was. And I desperately want to watch Gopher football this fall.
 

MplsGopher

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Sorry. I really don't mean to belittle your opinion, because it is every bit as viable as mine is; but regarding the bolded part of your post, I think you're delusional.

That said, I fervently hope you're right and I'm dead wrong. I want my world back the way it was. And I desperately want to watch Gopher football this fall.
There’s a chance he may end up being right ... but it would be a wild guess. He understands very little of the science and instead is lashing out based on emotion and gut feelings.
 

Wally

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I'm kind of surprised that nobody has mentioned the possibility that the covid case spike could be due in part to the protests and riots in June.
If the protests caused a spike why was there no spike in MN?
 

GophersInIowa

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These "leaders" are in CYA mode. Practically zero children will die


I'm pissed off that we took a mild pandemic and treated it like 1918. Yes, people are dying, but this one is milder than 1958 and 1968. We get a continuous stream of panic porn from the media, as the death counts keep dropping and we discover that half the population has existing coronavirus immunity...which means the whole thing will soon be over. The virus only transmits in close spaces like cruise ships, nursing homes and subways. It is not transmitted among the young, because of their strong immune systems.

The only reason to lock down was to give the hospitals space to handle the surge, then the governors decided they had to kill this highly infectious virus...so the hospitals lay at half capacity for weeks.

Our public health officials have been a cross between the Marx Brothers and the Three Stooges, our Governor gives ponderous briefings while locking out critical media. Meanwhile the majority of Minnesota deaths are among those with end-of-life directives.

Follow the science? The lockdowners followed a new and unproven response and moved our country several steps close to the boomer retirement debt bomb.

We could all use some Gopher football. None of them will be damaged by COVID-19.
We've already passed the US death toll for those two pandemics.
 

RahSkiUMah

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These "leaders" are in CYA mode. Practically zero children will die


I'm pissed off that we took a mild pandemic and treated it like 1918. Yes, people are dying, but this one is milder than 1958 and 1968. We get a continuous stream of panic porn from the media, as the death counts keep dropping and we discover that half the population has existing coronavirus immunity...which means the whole thing will soon be over. The virus only transmits in close spaces like cruise ships, nursing homes and subways. It is not transmitted among the young, because of their strong immune systems.

The only reason to lock down was to give the hospitals space to handle the surge, then the governors decided they had to kill this highly infectious virus...so the hospitals lay at half capacity for weeks.

Our public health officials have been a cross between the Marx Brothers and the Three Stooges, our Governor gives ponderous briefings while locking out critical media. Meanwhile the majority of Minnesota deaths are among those with end-of-life directives.

Follow the science? The lockdowners followed a new and unproven response and moved our country several steps close to the boomer retirement debt bomb.

We could all use some Gopher football. None of them will be damaged by COVID-19.
I try to stay middle of the road and try to bring people back to center. I'm of the opinion the best path to Gopher football is neither lockdowns nor unrestricted openings. If you want I will cite the info I'm basing that on and breakdown the reasons why.

You're a walking bag of conspiracy theories. Most of the crap you say is disproven by literature and statistics. Except those literature and statistics are all lies right? Unless they agree with you. When hit with real data you just run away and ignore it, maybe later provide the musings of anti-vax business majors (no offense to business majors meant). Your model country has suffered almost as much economic damage as we have. The "virus is dying" and all the counts are real as long as they're decreasing, if not doctors are lying right? Stick a cork in it.
 

MplsGopher

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Yeah I think it's ridiculous to say the protests didn't cause any spread. How much? That's hard to say. It's probably a combination of the protests, bars, parties, etc.
But the other variable that can't be controlled for retroactively is, how much of it is that now 20+ year olds have more access to the tests?
 

PitinoFan

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Today, we have the lowest number of hospitalizations since April 17th. Ironically, the peak was around the time of the riots.

 

MplsGopher

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The country hit a record for new cases today, according to worldometer. Over 70k new reported cases, first time over 70.

Deaths were “only” 850. But that’s still over 800 per day the last 4 days. Up significantly all of a sudden, but nowhere near the thousands per day of when NYC was driving it in full crisis mode.
 

MplsGopher

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Just seems silly.

You don't just shutter something that has been going strong for decades, because of a measly one year blip.

That would be like colleges saying they're forced to shutter the library and the student union, because of a lack money this year.
 

PitinoFan

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Just seems silly.

You don't just shutter something that has been going strong for decades, because of a measly one year blip.

That would be like colleges saying they're forced to shutter the library and the student union, because of a lack money this year.
They still have bills to pay, and no revenue coming in. For example, PJ still gets paid, whether they play or not, right? And all of the other coaches from all sports, Mark Coyle and his entire staff, etc. They also have facilities to pay for and maintain. It’s a big number. A lot of programs make little or no money to begin with.
 

MplsGopher

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They still have bills to pay, and no revenue coming in. For example, PJ still gets paid, whether they play or not, right? And all of the other coaches from all sports, Mark Coyle and his entire staff, etc. They also have facilities to pay for and maintain. It’s a big number. A lot of programs make little or no money to begin with.
Don't you think they could figure something out, for a year? As opposed to axing the whole thing?

I think all of the coaches could continue to live the lifestyles they've made for themselves, just fine, being furloughed.

Again, if the alternative is to cancel the athletics dept for all time moving forward ....
 

Pompous Elitist

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Just seems silly.

You don't just shutter something that has been going strong for decades, because of a measly one year blip.

That would be like colleges saying they're forced to shutter the library and the student union, because of a lack money this year.
There are pricing pressures on colleges and universities, and many athletic programs are not in the black. Not all regents and other decision makers are athletics friendly. I’d guess Brando’s hyperbole may have some truth behind it. Nobody really knows until actual decisions are made. Do athletics attract applicants at Northwestern (or pick any number of G5j the same way they do at Ohio State? Perceived anchor weight or marketing boon? May be local.
 

Pompous Elitist

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Without context it sounds very scary (and it is). These are terrible and tragic outcomes. But, what is the absolute risk and relative risk? COVID-19 is but one association - what is the incidence rate? The article notes 12 cases but the UK has had ~290,000 confirmed and likely 10x that infected although nobody really knows. The UK did not do much testing.

Some viral infections thought to induce ADEM include influenza virus, dengue, enterovirus, measles mumps, rubella, varicella zoster, Epstein–Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, hepatitis A, coxsackievirus and COVID-19. Bacterial infections include Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, Leptospira, and beta-hemolytic Streptococci. Very rarely, vaccinations have been associated



David Strain, a senior clinical lecturer at the University of Exeter Medical School, said that only a small number of patients appeared to experience serious neurological complications and that more work was needed to understand their prevalence.

“This is very important as we start to prepare post-Covid-19 rehabilitation programs,” he said. “We’ve already seen that some people with Covid-19 may need a long rehabilitation period, both physical rehabilitation such as exercise, and brain rehabilitation. We need to understand more about the impact of this infection on the brain.”
 

PMWinSTP

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Without context it sounds very scary (and it is). These are terrible and tragic outcomes. But, what is the absolute risk and relative risk? COVID-19 is but one association - what is the incidence rate? The article notes 12 cases but the UK has had ~290,000 confirmed and likely 10x that infected although nobody really knows. The UK did not do much testing.

Some viral infections thought to induce ADEM include influenza virus, dengue, enterovirus, measles mumps, rubella, varicella zoster, Epstein–Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, hepatitis A, coxsackievirus and COVID-19. Bacterial infections include Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, Leptospira, and beta-hemolytic Streptococci. Very rarely, vaccinations have been associated



David Strain, a senior clinical lecturer at the University of Exeter Medical School, said that only a small number of patients appeared to experience serious neurological complications and that more work was needed to understand their prevalence.

“This is very important as we start to prepare post-Covid-19 rehabilitation programs,” he said. “We’ve already seen that some people with Covid-19 may need a long rehabilitation period, both physical rehabilitation such as exercise, and brain rehabilitation. We need to understand more about the impact of this infection on the brain.”
I found the article interesting and informative. Context was provided, as you so deftly pointed out, in the article. Actually more than 40 cases as stated in the second paragraph.

UK has the highest test per million rate of any country with 10 million+ population, and 38% higher per million than the US.
 

Pompous Elitist

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I found the article interesting and informative. Context was provided, as you so deftly pointed out, in the article. Actually more than 40 cases as stated in the second paragraph.

UK has the highest test per million rate of any country with 10 million+ population, and 38% higher per million than the US.
IIRC many of those mentioned were temporary delirium without imaging markers that resolved spontaneously. The ones I mentioned were more likely to be the potential long-termers, ie the ADEM mentioned. Yes, some people die and some people have long term disability as with other diseases. These cases occur every year in every larger city in every country.
 

MplsGopher

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There are pricing pressures on colleges and universities, and many athletic programs are not in the black. Not all regents and other decision makers are athletics friendly. I’d guess Brando’s hyperbole may have some truth behind it. Nobody really knows until actual decisions are made. Do athletics attract applicants at Northwestern (or pick any number of G5j the same way they do at Ohio State? Perceived anchor weight or marketing boon? May be local.
I am fine with this post. I disagreed with the previous post.
 

PMWinSTP

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IIRC many of those mentioned were temporary delirium without imaging markers that resolved spontaneously. The ones I mentioned were more likely to be the potential long-termers, ie the ADEM mentioned. Yes, some people die and some people have long term disability as with other diseases. These cases occur every year in every larger city in every country.
You may want to reread to see how the article matches your recollection.

We’re seeing things in the way Covid-19 affects the brain that we haven’t seen before with other viruses,” said Michael Zandi, a senior author on the study and a consultant at the institute and University College London Hospitals NHS foundation trust.
 

MplsGopher

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The virus itself only binds to certain cells in the respiratory system. This is scientifically proven. A cell can't be attacked by a virus unless it has the right kind of receptor, and those receptors are only found in those respiratory cells.

BUT, obviously, something else then happens, to varying degrees in people, after those cells get infected.

It's the immune response, mucking things up. Somehow. Causing blood clots. Causing damage to blood vessels. Causing damage to the nervous system.


The body is a bag of chemicals, with an incredibly complex control/regulatory system. Feedback control loops. So it's not like you can just say "OK, we'll just get rid of all cytokines in the body!". That would then screw something else up.


We'll have this thing pretty well figured out and characterized .... in 20-30 years from now.
 

Pompous Elitist

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You may want to reread to see how the article matches your recollection.

We’re seeing things in the way Covid-19 affects the brain that we haven’t seen before with other viruses,” said Michael Zandi, a senior author on the study and a consultant at the institute and University College London Hospitals NHS foundation trust.
Yes, there are unusual facets like the rare neurological effects described which probably result from a deranged immune response to SARS2. Yes, there are unique factors to consider like whether antibody dependent enhancement is part of severe illness and may be an ongoing and increasing issue with future infection or with vaccination (ie second exposure to antigenically drifted coronavirus months or years later results in deranged immune response and worse disease). We don’t really know, and we don’t know what the future holds. However, RIGHT NOW, these complications are very rare and should be talked about as such until evidence warrants otherwise.
 

Pompous Elitist

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The virus itself only binds to certain cells in the respiratory system. This is scientifically proven. A cell can't be attacked by a virus unless it has the right kind of receptor, and those receptors are only found in those respiratory cells.

BUT, obviously, something else then happens, to varying degrees in people, after those cells get infected.

It's the immune response, mucking things up. Somehow. Causing blood clots. Causing damage to blood vessels. Causing damage to the nervous system.


The body is a bag of chemicals, with an incredibly complex control/regulatory system. Feedback control loops. So it's not like you can just say "OK, we'll just get rid of all cytokines in the body!". That would then screw something else up.


We'll have this thing pretty well figured out and characterized .... in 20-30 years from now.
Right. There is more we don’t know than we do know when it comes to many things. It is rational and correct to minimize transmission and spread WITHOUT inducing known and predictable knock on effects. The season may be delayed a month or two. It may not happen at all. We don’t know. All we know is things will look very different in 3-4 months in ways we can’t predict.

Without aggressive testing, risk mitigation I don’t see either school or football happening for the next 12 months, minimum. What are we doing on that front?
 

PMWinSTP

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Yes, there are unusual facets like the rare neurological effects described which probably result from a deranged immune response to SARS2. Yes, there are unique factors to consider like whether antibody dependent enhancement is part of severe illness and may be an ongoing and increasing issue with future infection or with vaccination (ie second exposure to antigenically drifted coronavirus months or years later results in deranged immune response and worse disease). We don’t really know, and we don’t know what the future holds. However, RIGHT NOW, these complications are very rare and should be talked about as such until evidence warrants otherwise.
Appreciate your clarifying posts. Yep, article covered that it is a small sample but concerning and needs to be monitored an explored.

Also, wondering why you posted UK did not do much testing?
 
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