All Things COVID-19 College Football Impact

STPGopher

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Small towns are clearly not immune. A bar in Mpls has the same spacing concerns as a bar in Fulda. Nobody is really safe, some are just safer than than others. We know what causes transmission, for the most part. But here we are, still banging out heads against the wall. We clearly can’t force anyone to do the right thing, eh STP? Escalation between short tempered and ill tempered people leads to problems, I’ve seen.
Smalltowns are being tricked into thinking they are safe. The rest? Carry-on...
 

Pompous Elitist

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Smalltowns are being tricked into thinking they are safe. The rest? Carry-on...
I don't necessarily think it’s small town vs big city. It’s young vs old (with many exceptions). Fatalistic-minded versus safety cultists. Pragmatic vs absolutists.
 

GoldenRodents

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The scary thing is this thing was built in a Chinese lab. They have the infectious thing down, now when they add the lethality...

This was a great dry run to show our vulnerabilities. Next time, it might be the real thing.
 

MplsGopher

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I’m pretty sure some cities instituted shutdowns in 1918 to good effect. Of course, they didn’t even know what a virus was back then other than a non-bacterial particle or miasma.

Oftentimes less is more. This should be on a plaque in every household, clinic, school, hospital, boardroom, manager office. Stop, think, use evidence, avoid fear-based decisions.

More to do with crime, poverty, lack of peace of mind and recreational activities. I wouldn’t be comfortable in small town Oklahoma either for some different reasons. I suspect many people that live in urban centers would rather not live in urban centers.
I think it is a valid idea, that you're proposing. Maybe next time it will be worth a try.

Less might have been more in this case, as well. But it was never going to happen. Something had to be done, and it never would've flown to only shut down portions of a state. No state did such a thing.

How convenient for you that there are more recreational activities in wealthy areas, which de facto segregate against poor minorities. It's all tied together. You know that, but use it a thin veil to live in a place that's more white ("safe" minorities are allowed, Asians (South, East)).
 

MplsGopher

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The scary thing is this thing was built in a Chinese lab. They have the infectious thing down, now when they add the lethality...

This was a great dry run to show our vulnerabilities. Next time, it might be the real thing.
You don't really believe that fabricated lie, do you?

People will believe anything they want to believe, these days.
 

PitinoFan

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Looking at the Sweden data, and seeing how quickly New York’s numbers dropped off, it seems like it just has to run its course. That’s what’s happening in several Southern states right now. By September, nobody will be talking about Texas and Florida anymore. There’s no stopping the infections without a vaccine. Shutting down the economy didn’t even work. The key is protecting the vulnerable, which we did not do very well in Minnesota, New York, Michigan, etc.
 

MplsGopher

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Looking at the Sweden data, and seeing how quickly New York’s numbers dropped off, it seems like it just has to run its course. That’s what’s happening in several Southern states right now. By September, nobody will be talking about Texas and Florida anymore. There’s no stopping the infections without a vaccine. Shutting down the economy didn’t even work. The key is protecting the vulnerable, which we did not do very well in Minnesota, New York, Michigan, etc.
Isn't that the point?

If a vaccine can realistically get here around the end of the year, then doesn't it make sense to try to stretch out the infections until then? Try to save as many lives as we can?
 

Some guy

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Isn't that the point?

If a vaccine can realistically get here around the end of the year, then doesn't it make sense to try to stretch out the infections until then? Try to save as many lives as we can?
I think that would make total sense if you could guarantee a vaccine by the end of the year.

There still isn’t an HIV vaccine
There still isn’t a norovirus vaccine
We still have to develop a vaccine each year for the flu because it changes.

I don’t believe I’ve seen any evidence you can get Covid19 twice...but if you could that would make a vaccine pretty ineffective.


What should be done if there is never a vaccine in your opinion? I’m not a vaccine developer or scientist but I have to believe there is greater than 0 chance there is never an effective vaccine.
 

Some guy

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Looking at the Sweden data, and seeing how quickly New York’s numbers dropped off, it seems like it just has to run its course. That’s what’s happening in several Southern states right now. By September, nobody will be talking about Texas and Florida anymore. There’s no stopping the infections without a vaccine. Shutting down the economy didn’t even work. The key is protecting the vulnerable, which we did not do very well in Minnesota, New York, Michigan, etc.
Protecting the vulnerable was really tough because of the way our healthcare system is designed.
TCU units are money makers for a lot of nursing homes. But they were literal death traps for those in non tcu units on a different floor or in a different area of the building.
I think if New York could do it over again rather than building temporary hospitals that mostly weren’t used they would’ve built large temporary TCU units to keep anyone who had been in a hospital out of any nursing homes
 

MplsGopher

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I think that would make total sense if you could guarantee a vaccine by the end of the year.

There still isn’t an HIV vaccine
There still isn’t a norovirus vaccine
We still have to develop a vaccine each year for the flu because it changes.

I don’t believe I’ve seen any evidence you can get Covid19 twice...but if you could that would make a vaccine pretty ineffective.


What should be done if there is never a vaccine in your opinion? I’m not a vaccine developer or scientist but I have to believe there is greater than 0 chance there is never an effective vaccine.
HIV attacks the immune system, which is what a vaccine tries to "train". That might make a vaccine impossible. I haven't seen any evidence that sars2 virus does that.

If norovirus was killing as many as cv19 was, then probably the same type of "warp speed" funding and effort would be put into that.

"The flu" is actually caused by many different strains of virus. And it mutates much faster. Sars2 is still a single strain and isn't mutating nearly as fast, is what I've read.

Have not seen any evidence that people infected can get re-infected. Early reports were based on false positives from ineffective tests.


No idea. That's a question we'd have to try to answer if it comes to that. Hoping that it won't. What would they have done if polio or small pox never had an effective vaccine? There was greater than zero chance there, too.
 

Some guy

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HIV attacks the immune system, which is what a vaccine tries to "train". That might make a vaccine impossible. I haven't seen any evidence that sars2 virus does that.

If norovirus was killing as many as cv19 was, then probably the same type of "warp speed" funding and effort would be put into that.

"The flu" is actually caused by many different strains of virus. And it mutates much faster. Sars2 is still a single strain and isn't mutating nearly as fast, is what I've read.

Have not seen any evidence that people infected can get re-infected. Early reports were based on false positives from ineffective tests.


No idea. That's a question we'd have to try to answer if it comes to that. Hoping that it won't. What would they have done if polio or small pox never had an effective vaccine? There was greater than zero chance there, too.
still no malaria vaccine either


When do you start to try to answer that question?

we shut everything down until spring waiting for a vaccine? Do we start having that conversation then?

second round of vaccine tests might be read fall 2021...do we start having the conversation then?
 

Pompous Elitist

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I’d guess there will be a modicum of herd immunity, ie significantly slowed transmission rate) in younger peoples and essential worker populations by year’s end simply based on the realities of their socialization habits, impending school, etc. Look at the current infection numbers by age strata. Look at the minimum number of months until widespread availability of any vaccine. Consider that vaccines are not always effective in the elderly due to their inherent age-related attenuated immune response. Consider a vaccine may not always generate memory B and T cells even in younger patients. Many people simply won’t take time out of their day to go get it, or will refuse mandatory vaccines because trust in the scientific community has already been badly broken in this pandemic, far beyond the antivaxx sentiment present previously.
 

The prez sez

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The scary thing is this thing was built in a Chinese lab. They have the infectious thing down, now when they add the lethality...

This was a great dry run to show our vulnerabilities. Next time, it might be the real thing.
Back off the Kool-Aid for a while
 

GoldenRodents

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You don't really believe that fabricated lie, do you?

People will believe anything they want to believe, these days.
@MplsGopher, @"The prez sez"

Why do you guys insist an believing the approved narrative? The best and freest minds believe that the high infectiousness in COVID-19 must have been supplied by human manipulation.

Origins of COVID-19
 

Nax5

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The scary thing is this thing was built in a Chinese lab. They have the infectious thing down, now when they add the lethality...

This was a great dry run to show our vulnerabilities. Next time, it might be the real thing.
Why? Just why? If that were the case, they also unleashed the virus on their own people and all allies. It was indiscriminate. And there was no cure. So what is the end goal? Surely not world domination if everyone is dead.

Can conspiracy theories not live in the football forum? Come on lol.
 

MplsGopher

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@MplsGopher, @"The prez sez"

Why do you guys insist an believing the approved narrative? The best and freest minds believe that the high infectiousness in COVID-19 must have been supplied by human manipulation.

Origins of COVID-19
The best and freest Free of what, the bounds of scientific fact and reasoning?

I will post these links here, for other people who are curious. But I know you won't take the time to read these. You'll dismiss them immediately, because this hard evidence doesn't fit with your a priori beliefs.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-020-0820-9
The proximal origin of SARS-CoV-2

https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2020/03/26/genomic-research-points-to-natural-origin-of-covid-19/
Genomic Study Points to Natural Origin of COVID-19

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200317175442.htm
COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic has a natural origin


Also, to show that I am not (completely) a biased hack, I'll leave one more link here, which supports me 100%, but also will give you the smallest crack of a sliver to wiggle through, and I'm sure you will.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-01449-8

Animal source of the coronavirus continues to elude scientists
As a growing number of countries push for an independent investigation into the origin of the COVID-19 pandemic, many scientists around the world are already trying to uncover when, where and how the new coronavirus got into people.

Finding the source is important for preventing further reinfection, but scientists’ investigations — which include modelling, cell studies and animal experiments — are revealing how tricky pinpointing the source might be.

“It is quite possible we won’t find it. In fact, it would be exceptionally lucky if we land on something,” says Lucy van Dorp, a geneticist from University College London (UCL).

There is strong evidence that the virus originated in bats. The biggest mystery remains how it got from bats to people. Researchers overwhelmingly think that it’s a wild virus, which probably passed to people through an intermediate species. But no one has found the virus in the wild yet, so other explanations cannot be ruled out entirely.

US President Donald Trump has fuelled suggestions that the virus might have leaked from a laboratory in Wuhan, where the outbreak started. There is no evidence for that claim.

Still, other world leaders have called for investigations into the outbreak's origin. The European Union and dozens of nations are supporting a draft proposal submitted to the World Health Assembly, the key decision making-body of the World Health Organisation, which is holding a virtual meeting with member states today and tomorrow. The proposal calls for “scientific and collaborative field missions” to “identify the zoonotic source of the virus and the route of introduction to the human population, including the possible role of intermediate hosts”.

The only way to say with confidence which animal the virus came from is to find it in that species in the wild, says Arinjay Banerjee, a coronavirus researcher at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. “Other approaches will only give you anecdotal evidence,” he says.
 

GoldenRodents

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@MplsGopher: Prudence requires that we consider the laboratory source of the virus.
The ultra contagious human transmission of the virus is highly unusual. The cost of being wrong is much larger on your side.

Here is a good place to start:

The best and freest Free of what, the bounds of scientific fact and reasoning?
 

MplsGopher

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@MplsGopher: Prudence requires that we consider the laboratory source of the virus.
The ultra contagious human transmission of the virus is highly unusual. The cost of being wrong is much larger on your side.

Here is a good place to start:
Board software is screwing up the link. Here is the link, with the http modified so it won't recognize it.

h ttps://medium.com/@yurideigin/lab-made-cov2-genealogy-through-the-lens-of-gain-of-function-research-f96dd7413748


This is just click bait. It's literally every known molecular biology/genetics factoid about the virus, thrown into one "article" that no person could every hope to read through and understand. I'm sure there's some kind of formal name for this logical fallacy. Something like "superficial appearance of credibility". Does the author actually understand any of what he's annotating? Maybe some. He's not an academic, he's a CEO with an MBA. Bright guy, I'm sure, but not a scientist. Seems more like the villain from a sci-fi thriller novel.

You're just reading the last paragraph and declaring victory. You have no idea what the stuff in the middle is saying. To be honest, neither do I. And I'm not going to take the time to understand it, either.


This is the perfect type of post that appeals to you and your ilk of Qanon: can't easily be disproven, and to do so would take more time than any regular person is willing to spend, therefore you get to spin a yarn about how this proves your radical position to be true.
 

PoockItInfor6

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I just found out that the CDC started convoluting positive tests and positive antibody tests... so that explains why we have less deaths yesterday than any day since mid March at the same time as the surge in “positives”.

This feels incredibly dishonest, considering the headlines are all presenting this huge surge as a “2nd wave”, and warning of impending doom.
 

short ornery norwegian

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Hey - the thread is supposed to about the impact of the virus on College Football. Can we as least try to keep somewhat on topic?

So, let's assume for the sake of argument that, with increased testing, there will be more positive cases, but possibly fewer hospitalizations or ICU cases - due to the new infections mainly hitting a younger, healthier segment of the population.

(and yes - there will be outliers on both sides. some younger people will get pretty sick and some will test positive and never show a single symptom.)

It still gets back to the question - how will teams deal with positive tests?

This could literally decide conference titles and/or playoff berths.

if a team happens to have several key players test positive a day or two before the "big game," their season could be hosed.

so now, fans will have to track not only traditional FB injuries, but positive covid testing from week to week.

And if you're a bettor, imagine the betting lines if key players test positive. I could see a lot of games being taken off the board due to the virus.
 

OldBob53

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Given the resurgence already in states that have opened up, I don't see much chance for a college football season in 2020. Note that experts predict the virus will come back with a vengeance this fall/winter.
 

PitinoFan

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There’s talk of some Big Ten teams having contingency plans, which include scheduling home and home series with teams in the same region, including FCS teams. There’s supposedly a West team that already has a backup schedule in place. SDSU? NDSU?

 

Mulligan

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Hey - the thread is supposed to about the impact of the virus on College Football. Can we as least try to keep somewhat on topic?
It still gets back to the question - how will teams deal with positive tests?
I don't think it likely, but can imagine a scenario where a team conceals a positive result so a vital player can still take the field. As wired and competitive as football coaches are, and if the player is showing no symptoms, will everyone bench his All-American before the big game?
 

PoockItInfor6

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Hey - the thread is supposed to about the impact of the virus on College Football. Can we as least try to keep somewhat on topic?

So, let's assume for the sake of argument that, with increased testing, there will be more positive cases, but possibly fewer hospitalizations or ICU cases - due to the new infections mainly hitting a younger, healthier segment of the population.

(and yes - there will be outliers on both sides. some younger people will get pretty sick and some will test positive and never show a single symptom.)

It still gets back to the question - how will teams deal with positive tests?

This could literally decide conference titles and/or playoff berths.

if a team happens to have several key players test positive a day or two before the "big game," their season could be hosed.

so now, fans will have to track not only traditional FB injuries, but positive covid testing from week to week.

And if you're a bettor, imagine the betting lines if key players test positive. I could see a lot of games being taken off the board due to the virus.
My post was very pertinent as to whether there will be a season... the “new cases” being reported include many cases that had actually happened in January, March, April, etc. and the individual is already recovered and now has antibodies... If we are reporting those as new cases now and looking at that as a 2nd wave... no chance we have a season. If we look at the trend of deaths and can separate actual new cases... and those continue downward trajectory... we likely can have a season.
 

PitinoFan

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This is probably similar to almost all of these football players. No symptoms! Strong immune systems make quick work of the virus.

 

BleedGopher

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Dodd: Time is no longer on college football's side as myriad issues remain for 2020 season to start as scheduled

College football's biggest ally throughout the coronavirus pandemic had been time. COVID-19 struck in the offseason.

Spring practice was impacted, sure, but there was still five months until the start of the season. Plenty of time, they said, to figure out testing. Likewise, plenty of time to get players back on campus and to consider what a 2020 season would look like.

The game's stakeholders had the time to figure all of it out. That's not the case anymore.

Time? College football is running out of it, at least if it plans to kick off the 2020 season as scheduled.


We are 53 days away from Week 0. Aug. 29 is in 7 ½ weeks. Required summer workouts could begin for some teams as soon as this week. For those kicking off Labor Day weekend in the traditional Week 1, preseason camp begins in less than a month, on or about Aug. 7.

Suddenly, time has gone from ally to an unblocked blitzing linebacker.

July is likely the month we'll know whether there will be some form of a season this fall. SEC commissioner Greg Sankey recently said it is "probably a late-July time period" for a decision.


Go Gophers!!
 
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