’18 Athletic Department Study Showed Serious Racial Bias in Iowa Football

Pompous Elitist

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Or their inherently racist and privileged white parents.
You’re going to continue this and reduce the accomplishments of players to their genetics. Like feathers in the breeze, mama always said.
 

Taji34

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I suspect that’s a general sense of Iowans and Minnesotans for that matter. Lake Wobegon, etc. Nothing inherently wrong with being proud of where you come from or how you were raised. Grow some skin, people.
There is a difference between being proud of where or how you were raised, and telling others how or where they were raised was bad or incorrect.

Saying "Growing up on a farm really showed me how to keep working even when its tough or I am tired" is being proud of your rural upbringing.

Saying "Anyone who doesn't grow up on a farm doesn't know the meaning of hard work" is putting down others because they grew up differently than you (and just flat out an incorrect statement).
 

A_Slab_of_Bacon

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There is a difference between being proud of where or how you were raised, and telling others how or where they were raised was bad or incorrect.

Saying "Growing up on a farm really showed me how to keep working even when its tough or I am tired" is being proud of your rural upbringing.

Saying "Anyone who doesn't grow up on a farm doesn't know the meaning of hard work" is putting down others because they grew up differently than you (and just flat out an incorrect statement).
 

Pompous Elitist

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There is a difference between being proud of where or how you were raised, and telling others how or where they were raised was bad or incorrect.

Saying "Growing up on a farm really showed me how to keep working even when its tough or I am tired" is being proud of your rural upbringing.

Saying "Anyone who doesn't grow up on a farm doesn't know the meaning of hard work" is putting down others because they grew up differently than you (and just flat out an incorrect statement).
Is that what was said, though?

I doubt it.
 

MplsGopher

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You’re going to continue this and reduce the accomplishments of players to their genetics. Like feathers in the breeze, mama always said.
The post said that white Iowa players accused black players essentially of being lazy because of black culture.

Those players had to learn that attitude somewhere, and it could very likely be their racist white Iowan parents.
 

Taji34

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Is that what was said, though?

I doubt it.
To quote the article:
White student-athletes believe some students are treated differently but attribute it to “geographical” rather than racial differences. As an example, students not from this region may have a difficult time understanding “hard work” and “doing things right all the time, both academically and socially.”
While that statement may not be word-for-word the same as I said above, it is STILL putting down others because they grew up differently than you. That is a problem.
 

MplsGopher

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To quote the article:

While that statement may not be word-for-word the same as I said above, it is STILL putting down others because they grew up differently than you. That is a problem.
And the obvious implied context is that southern blacks are lazy.
 

Gopherlife

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Well, if a number of black people came out and said you were belittling them for the way they wore their pants, but oddly, white people who also wore their pants the same way never had that experience with you...yes, it would be looked at as a pattern and the reason you were only saying this stuff to black people would be questioned.
Aside from accounts from these players, it's hard to know whether racism was in play. I think it will stay that way. In the current climate, do you really believe white players feel like they could come out and openly state that they were treated in the same way as these black players, when they would anger so many people by doing so? They would be seen as trying to take the spotlight away from these black players and/or portrayed as condoning the behavior of the coaching staff. Why would they want to bring that upon themselves?
 

LakerFan

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And the obvious implied context is that southern blacks people are lazy.
That makes it a cultural stereotype that isn't racial. I went through some recruiting camps with my son and daughter and when we went out west or out east coaches would talk about liking to sprinkle in some midwestern kids (white or black) on their rosters because of the work ethic, even if culturally the midwest doesn't emphasize athletics as early or as seriously as other parts of the country.
 

MplsGopher

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That makes it a cultural stereotype that isn't racial. I went through some recruiting camps with my son and daughter and when we went out west or out east coaches would talk about liking to sprinkle in some midwestern kids (white or black) on their rosters because of the work ethic, even if culturally the midwest doesn't emphasize athletics as early or as seriously as other parts of the country.
Same old thing: how many white guys from the south did Iowa recruit? So how can the midwestern whites who said it know for sure if they thought that because it was always blacks and they don’t like blacks or if it was for the more innocuous reasoning that they’d like to claim?
 

Pompous Elitist

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To quote the article:

While that statement may not be word-for-word the same as I said above, it is STILL putting down others because they grew up differently than you. That is a problem.
Seems more like a misunderstanding or defensiveness, to me.
 

Taji34

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Seems more like a misunderstanding or defensiveness, to me.
Maybe, but that doesn't change that that is what they said, which was the whole root of the argument. Those words were said, regardless of the intention, and they had a negative impact. Words matter, impact matters.
 

MplsGopher

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You’re literally putting your own prejudices into the mouths of others. Can’t make it up.
The phrase you were looking for is “calling a spade a spade”.

Did I get a little too close for comfort for you?
 

#2Gopher

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Despite all this no one has de-committed as far as I know.
 

Pompous Elitist

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Maybe, but that doesn't change that that is what they said, which was the whole root of the argument. Those words were said, regardless of the intention, and they had a negative impact. Words matter, impact matters.
What words?
 

Taji34

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What words?
White student-athletes believe some students are treated differently but attribute it to “geographical” rather than racial differences. As an example, students not from this region may have a difficult time understanding “hard work” and “doing things right all the time, both academically and socially.”
 

MplsGopher

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White student-athletes believe some students are treated differently but attribute it to “geographical” rather than racial differences. As an example, students not from this region may have a difficult time understanding “hard work” and “doing things right all the time, both academically and socially.”
He'll just continue his lazy, dishonest gaslighting. "Who said it? When? What was the context?" blah blah blah

He doesn't want honest discussion on this. If he did, he'd be doing it by now.

Continue with him down this path at your own preference/desire.
 

short ornery norwegian

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Even if it's not racism, it's a level of superiority that seems to go against the very notion of team building and togetherness.

If one group of team members is saying, suggesting or implying that another group of team members - for whatever reason - just don't know how to work hard or do things the right way - that is not going to promote team unity.

It's one group of players telling another group "we're better than you."

Football is supposed to be all about unity - team - bonding - togetherness.

But at Iowa, it's apparently about one group of players telling another group of players that they are inferior.

No problem. I'm sure that makes for a cohesive locker room. It's all fine - just as long as we agree that there is nothing racial about it.
 

Pompous Elitist

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Those words were statements or quotes from some of the students, not the coaches. The full report can be read here if you’re interested:


Is the student allegation of coaches requiring “doing things right all the time, both academically and socially” inherently racist?
 

Pompous Elitist

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Even if it's not racism, it's a level of superiority that seems to go against the very notion of team building and togetherness.

If one group of team members is saying, suggesting or implying that another group of team members - for whatever reason - just don't know how to work hard or do things the right way - that is not going to promote team unity.

It's one group of players telling another group "we're better than you."

Football is supposed to be all about unity - team - bonding - togetherness.

But at Iowa, it's apparently about one group of players telling another group of players that they are inferior.

No problem. I'm sure that makes for a cohesive locker room. It's all fine - just as long as we agree that there is nothing racial about it.
It’s their perception. Their is no evidence Ferentz (or the players) has ever stated these things. OTOH, there is plenty of evidence of people becoming conditioned to look for innuendo or evidence of racism in relatively innocuous activities and discipline. Is it possible some players require more discipline, or simply don’t fit into a semi-rigid culture?
 

MplsGopher

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There is plenty of evidence that some posters choose to pretend that certain activities and discipline are relatively innocuous.

That's how they enteretain themselves on internet message boards.
 

MplsGopher

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Other posters see through your limited-value, incessant gaslighting.

The shtick gets old, and doesn't add much in the way of honest discussion.

People can participate with you as they see fit.
 

MplsGopher

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Even if it's not racism, it's a level of superiority that seems to go against the very notion of team building and togetherness.

If one group of team members is saying, suggesting or implying that another group of team members - for whatever reason - just don't know how to work hard or do things the right way - that is not going to promote team unity.

It's one group of players telling another group "we're better than you."

Football is supposed to be all about unity - team - bonding - togetherness.

But at Iowa, it's apparently about one group of players telling another group of players that they are inferior.

No problem. I'm sure that makes for a cohesive locker room. It's all fine - just as long as we agree that there is nothing racial about it.
At Iowa, like at some other programs, it's about using blacks, sometimes from outside the upper midwest, to create and sustain a massive cash cow, football factory, and discarding them like trash when they're done.
 

Pompous Elitist

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At Iowa, like at some other programs, it's about using blacks, sometimes from outside the upper midwest, to create and sustain a massive cash cow, football factory, and discarding them like trash when they're done.
The coaches perspective (from the report) is there is low “buy-in” from some student athletes.

Some of the Iowa players (and posters on GH) perspective is the coaches and The Iowa Way are racist.

Which is it? Which makes more sense to you? Perhaps both are true. I’ve not seen convincing evidence Ferentz or his irritating son are anything more than insensitive at worst, and inevitably there are going to be frictions between some players and staff. I’d guess similar allegations and issues could be made vs any coach, including our own if we dig far enough. Could that ever become a problem, with the MN culture?
 

LesBolstad

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At Iowa, like at some other programs, it's about using blacks, sometimes from outside the upper midwest, to create and sustain a massive cash cow, football factory, and discarding them like trash when they're done.
Haha, what a clown. Dude, i've seen the metrics and you're on "ignore" over 2X your nearest "rival" on GH. That should tell you something.
 
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