Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: RPO

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Willmar, MN
    Posts
    1,895

    Default RPO

    I'm no elite football mind but does anyone else think the rpo hurts our running game a little?. I feel like when in a running play the o line gets out and pushes to open lanes but in rpo they pass protect and trying to run behind that is tougher since the o line just holds their block but isn't really pushing downfield opening holes. Am I way off?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


  2. #2

    Default

    Well, from what I've observed, we tend to block the RPO the same way we do a straight-up run. I've remarked in the past that it's surprising we don't get more "ineligible receiver" penalties because our OL is aggressively coming off the ball and going after LBs.

    Yesterday, we were called for it once. I don't expect that will lead to any changes.

    JTG
    Last edited by rockford; 09-29-2019 at 12:12 PM.

  3. #3

    Default

    I do not want to enter the RPO discussion but only able to hear the end of the 4th quarter on the radio. The fellas commented multiple times if Tanner keeps it he’ll score a touchdown, he’ll run forever, they are completely ignoring the QB keeping the ball etc etc

  4. #4

    Default

    RPO seems to be the biggest thing in football since sliced bread. I feel like TV commentators say a play is RPO even if they don't really know that to be the case or not.


    Is the following correct or not? The RPO is just a called handoff running play ... except if the QB sees something in the first couple moments of a play, he can zing the ball out to a receiver, and the refs "probably" won't call ineligible downfield, even though it is, because they don't call that often and it has some "wiggle room".


    So I feel like, if defensive coaches simply complain enough, and refs get more stringent on calling ineligible downfield .... it's dead.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CentralGopher View Post
    I'm no elite football mind but does anyone else think the rpo hurts our running game a little?. I feel like when in a running play the o line gets out and pushes to open lanes but in rpo they pass protect and trying to run behind that is tougher since the o line just holds their block but isn't really pushing downfield opening holes. Am I way off?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    If the play is an RPO, I assure you the OLine is simply run blocking. The only person on the field who knows if it will be a pass or a run is the QB.

    The announcers kept calling the slants an RPO, but it looked like the line was pass blocking to me. If thatís the case, it was a pass play all along.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 60's Guy View Post
    I do not want to enter the RPO discussion but only able to hear the end of the 4th quarter on the radio. The fellas commented multiple times if Tanner keeps it he’ll score a touchdown, he’ll run forever, they are completely ignoring the QB keeping the ball etc etc
    The radio guys don’t know the difference between a RPO and a Read Option. I’ll bet the play call is to hand off but designed so it looks like a read option.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MnplsGopher View Post
    RPO seems to be the biggest thing in football since sliced bread. I feel like TV commentators say a play is RPO even if they don't really know that to be the case or not.


    Is the following correct or not? The RPO is just a called handoff running play ... except if the QB sees something in the first couple moments of a play, he can zing the ball out to a receiver, and the refs "probably" won't call ineligible downfield, even though it is, because they don't call that often and it has some "wiggle room".


    So I feel like, if defensive coaches simply complain enough, and refs get more stringent on calling ineligible downfield .... it's dead.
    For sure. The guys on TV call anything with a play-action an RPO these days.
    The QB has a pre-snap and post-snap read. Usually an outside LB or a DB playing up. If the numbers are good in the box, he’ll hand off. If the defense is loading the box, he’ll pass. Usually the pass is quick enough that a Lineman is only a few yards downfield which won’t draw a penalty.

  8. #8

    Default

    With all of the discussion about the RPO on this site last week, it felt like the ESPN crew spent some time reading this site to prepare for the game. Anyways, it felt like teams have been scheming to stop the Gophers run game thus far, I can't imagine that will continue if they keep hitting those slants. I liked that they ran more outside zones yesterday too, that will free up some of those RUTM plays.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GoGoGopher12 View Post
    For sure. The guys on TV call anything with a play-action an RPO these days.
    The QB has a pre-snap and post-snap read. Usually an outside LB or a DB playing up. If the numbers are good in the box, he’ll hand off. If the defense is loading the box, he’ll pass. Usually the pass is quick enough that a Lineman is only a few yards downfield which won’t draw a penalty.
    Thanks for the reply!

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mkAz View Post
    With all of the discussion about the RPO on this site last week, it felt like the ESPN crew spent some time reading this site to prepare for the game. Anyways, it felt like teams have been scheming to stop the Gophers run game thus far, I can't imagine that will continue if they keep hitting those slants. I liked that they ran more outside zones yesterday too, that will free up some of those RUTM plays.
    With the number of talented WR we have, and with Tanner being an excellent throwing QB, they need to keep throwing the ball until teams switch their defensive gameplan to stop the pass. At that time, we can go back to run heavy.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MnplsGopher View Post
    Is the following correct or not? The RPO is just a called handoff running play ... except if the QB sees something in the first couple moments of a play, he can zing the ball out to a receiver, and the refs "probably" won't call ineligible downfield, even though it is, because they don't call that often and it has some "wiggle room".


    So I feel like, if defensive coaches simply complain enough, and refs get more stringent on calling ineligible downfield .... it's dead.
    I would say not correct. The RPO means the play called is a running play but with pass routes also attached to it. Either pre-snap but most likely post snap the QB is reading a particular defender to determine whether to hand to the RB or pull and throw to the WR who is running a route into the defenders area they are reading. OL block like a running play, thus at times they get too far downfield and can be flagged for Ineligible downfield. Which should be called more than it is on all offenses.
    A straight running play the WR would be going downfield and setting up to block the man over them.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rockford View Post
    Well, from what I've observed, we tend to block the RPO the same way we do a straight-up run. I've remarked in the past that it's surprising we don't get more "ineligible receiver" penalties because our OL is aggressively coming off the ball and going after LBs.

    Yesterday, we were called for it once. I don't expect that will lead to any changes.

    JTG
    In watching the tape for my "Up Front" review, the flag on Olson was BS. He made contact with a LB one yard off the line, took him back two yards, and the LB ran downfield when the ball was thrown. Completely legal. We've deserved penalties for this, but not on this play.

    JTG

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GoGoGopher12 View Post
    If the play is an RPO, I assure you the OLine is simply run blocking. The only person on the field who knows if it will be a pass or a run is the QB.

    The announcers kept calling the slants an RPO, but it looked like the line was pass blocking to me. If that’s the case, it was a pass play all along.
    Correct.
    I didn’t count but based on what I remember about 80% of the things described at RPO by the announcer weren’t RPO. They were simply play action passes

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GoGoGopher12 View Post
    The radio guys don’t know the difference between a RPO and a Read Option. I’ll bet the play call is to hand off but designed so it looks like a read option.
    The radio guys weren't commenting on RPO or Read Option. I think they were saying if they'd call a play asking Morgan to keep it (as he did in OT vs. Fresno for a TD) that Morgan would gain a lot of yards. Darrell mentioned it multiple times. I agree with him.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GoGoGopher12 View Post
    The radio guys donít know the difference between a RPO and a Read Option. Iíll bet the play call is to hand off but designed so it looks like a read option.
    I would trust the radio guys (Grimm and DT)long before I would trust any tv analyst. But all of the GHofers have the correct idea. The RPO is a real problem for our ÷L. Really have to have the discipline not to go after the LB until the decision is made. So far we have only had a couple of penalties. Not bad considering the number of times we have run the series. I am sure every opponent has made this a point of discussion with the game officials. Probably even to the Big Ten office.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •