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  1. #1
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    Default Here’s why high ticket prices and large stadiums are doomed

    Saw a demo of this recently and it’s incredibly cool. Once the tech is fleshed out there will be even less reason for many to fight traffic.




  2. #2
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    Football



  3. #3

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    I always thought TV brought a more comfortable and better view experience then even the “best” tickets. Attending the game has always been the social interaction with other fans, and other experiences like tailgating, paying to much for crappy hotdogs, at least in my mind.

    I see this as being better tv, not a substitute for attending the games.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DEGopher View Post
    I always thought TV brought a more comfortable and better view experience then even the “best” tickets. Attending the game has always been the social interaction with other fans, and other experiences like tailgating, paying to much for crappy hotdogs, at least in my mind.

    I see this as being better tv, not a substitute for attending the games.
    Totally agree. I go to 2-3 games per year to get the in person experience, but I really like watching the games from my couch with my dog and a steady stream of adult beverages from my fridge.

  5. #5

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    I think the Xfactor for this is when you can group chat the audio with friends watching the same game the same way. That's making a live NBA game very close to a FORTNITE/HALO gaming experience with friends who could be spread out accross the country and not available to just come over and watch the game. Probably more appealing to millenials than geezers like me.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by LakerFan View Post
    I think the Xfactor for this is when you can group chat the audio with friends watching the same game the same way. That's making a live NBA game very close to a FORTNITE/HALO gaming experience with friends who could be spread out accross the country and not available to just come over and watch the game. Probably more appealing to millenials than geezers like me.
    So explain how future revenue streams are derived to a level that supports big time college sports if nobody goes to games?

  7. #7
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    Most revenue is already coming from broadcast, not gate. I wasn’t saying it will eliminate in-game attendance for some of the reasons already stated - all things being equal sure you’d love to be there with real humans and have great seats. As the technology matures and exposure and adaption to VR ramps up amongst the general public IMO there will continue to be downward pressure on attendance. How much is hard to say. It’s hard to believe the IPhone is only a little over 10 years old but look how much things have changed in that time span.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wcfan56 View Post
    So explain how future revenue streams are derived to a level that supports big time college sports if nobody goes to games?
    Revenue would be derived from contracts to place Omnidirectional camera's at half court and be allowed to stream games, not dissimlilar to traditional contracts to broadcast TV signals. Bonus would be to providers that can support that level of data stream rate and can sell higher stream rates to customers who want lag free viewing. I don't see that much different from where the bulk of revenue comes now.

    College sports thrive if they make the in person game day experience better than watching remotely, they survive either way as I don't see the revenue dollars from broadcasting contracts going down any time soon.

  9. #9
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    The Power Conferences will follows the money trail. If it takes them to new technology into the future, they will adapt to the changes.

    I envision future digital technology like holographic imaging may be in the horizons. Nothing still replaces watching the game live and interacting socially. There will be a mix of options, but watching the game live in stadiums will never die.
    Welcome to Badger Road Kill Country!

  10. #10
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    can't remember where I read this, but I remember reading some article where the author was predicting future trends. for athletics, he predicted that in the future, pro sports and major college sports would have smaller arenas and stadiums that function like a TV studio, with smaller crowds serving as the "in-studio" audience, and most of the fans watching on TV or other devices.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by short ornery norwegian View Post
    can't remember where I read this, but I remember reading some article where the author was predicting future trends. for athletics, he predicted that in the future, pro sports and major college sports would have smaller arenas and stadiums that function like a TV studio, with smaller crowds serving as the "in-studio" audience, and most of the fans watching on TV or other devices.
    Does that mean we'll never expand the stadium?

    I don't know, I can't do VR for more than 10-15 minutes. I start getting disoriented. I would much rather have a less immersive TV broadcast over VR, but would prefer to be at the game. But again, I'm not 17 years old and been growing up with much of this technology my whole life. 20 years from now, maybe we'll never leave our house.

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