Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1

    Default NCAA Women's Basketball Rules Committee Proposals 2019

    http://www.ncaa.org/about/resources/...n-s-basketball


    The proposals fall into three categories:

    Three Point Line:

    The NCAA Women’s Basketball Rules Committee approved an experimental rule to use the international 3-point line for postseason events, excluding the NCAA championships in each division.

    Committee members, who met this week in Indianapolis, want to examine whether moving the line back to the distance of 22 feet, 1¾ inches will enhance the game. The current women’s 3-point arc sits at 20 feet, 9 inches.
    Player Conduct:
    The committee proposed that if a player receives one technical foul and one unsportsmanlike foul in the same game, the player would be ejected. If the change is approved by the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel on June 5, the rule would become effective for the 2019-20 season.

    Committee members also proposed changing a rule related to technical fouls. If approved, the team shooting two-shot technical foul free throws also would be awarded possession of the ball at the division line when play resumes.

    Another proposal would allow referees to address any acts of misconduct, provided the official is already at the monitor to review for an unsportsmanlike or contact disqualifying foul.
    Shot Clock Reset:
    The committee recommended resetting the shot clock to 20 seconds after a field-goal attempt hits the rim and the offensive team rebounds the ball in the front court.

    The committee made the proposal in an effort to continue to enhance the pace of the game. It reasoned that a full 30-second shot clock is not needed since the offensive team is already in the front court after securing the rebound.

    Also, committee members proposed that when the shot clock is below 20 seconds, it will reset to 20 seconds when a single personal foul is called or a violation, such as an intentionally kicked ball or if the ball is hit by a defensive player’s fist in their opponents’ front court, occurs. When the shot clock is at 20 seconds or above, it will not be reset in these situations.


  2. #2

    Default

    https://www.ncaa.com/news/basketball...ens-basketball

    There are a couple of rule changes. However, unlike the men's game, the three point line will remain where it is. Unfortunately, this means a second three point line on the court.

    Shot clock reset altered for the coming season:

    The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel approved resetting the shot clock in women’s basketball to 20 seconds after an attempted field goal hits the rim and the offensive team rebounds the ball in the front court. The rule is effective for the 2019-20 season in all three divisions.
    Also, when the shot clock is below 20 seconds, it will reset to 20 seconds when the defensive team commits a single personal foul or when the ball is intentionally kicked or hit with a fist in the offensive team’s frontcourt. When the shot clock is at 20 seconds or above, it will not be reset in these situations.
    Player conduct rule altered:

    The panel approved a rule that if a player receives one technical foul and one unsportsmanlike foul in the same game, the player would be ejected. This rule is effective for the 2019-20 season.

    Also, the offended team will be awarded the ball for a throw-in at the division line when the opponents have been assessed a player/substitute or bench technical foul when play resumes.
    Another change allows referees to address any acts of misconduct, provided the official is already at the monitor to review for an unsportsmanlike or contact disqualifying foul.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ignatius L Hoops View Post
    https://www.ncaa.com/news/basketball...ens-basketball
    Shot clock reset altered for the coming season:
    Also, when the shot clock is below 20 seconds, it will reset to 20 seconds ... when the ball is intentionally kicked ... in the offensive team’s frontcourt.
    In general, the kicking-the-ball reset is a good idea (lest the defense just kick the ball until the clock runs out for the offense). There is a similar WNBA rule, but I think the reset time is lower.

    However, on the down side, that's just one more seemingly easy-to-enforce rule that is an opportunity for (already poor) referees to mess up. Last night in the Lynx game at Seattle, that rule was improperly called against the Lynx - and Sheryl Reeve was hoppin mad and yelling at the ref. The Storm was running out of shot clock, and at the same time dribbling along the baseline but running out of in-bounds territory. The Storm player simply threw the ball directly off a Lynx player's leg so that it bouced out of bounds. That's a legit play and it indeed should grant the Storm the ball out of bounds - only without the shot clock reset - which was wrongfully granted to them. The key word is "intentionally." A Lynx player did not (in this case) make any legitimate defensive move with the leg - they were just standing there in a defensive position, and the Storm player intentionally (again the key word, however this time, "intentionally by the offense") threw it off the Lynx leg. If the referees are going to *badly* enforce this rule (present in the WNBA and now in the NCAA as well), then an offensive team would be able to extend their shot clock indefinitely and infinitely (until they either make a shot or commit a turnover or lose a defensive rebound) simply by throwing the ball off a defender's leg whenever their shot clock is running low. And, if thus badly enforced, the ball would not even have to ricochet out of bounds; merely hitting a defender's leg would be sufficient to extend the shot clock. So given that a WNBA ref already got it wrong, and given how much worse NCAA refs are than WNBA refs, they better give their refs some good training on this one, or else it's going to be a fiasco.
    Last edited by CutDownTheNet; 06-05-2019 at 05:59 PM.

  4. #4

    Default

    http://www.ncaa.org/about/resources/...chairs-2019-21

    A couple of things from the NCAA WBB Committee:

    Recommends a two site regional format:
    In addition, the committee also recommended pursuing a two-site, eight-team regional format by the 2023 championship, while backing the use of the NCAA Evaluation Tool in the evaluation of teams.

    The committee’s recommendation to move to a two-site regional format effective for the 2023 championship was supported by the Division I Women’s Basketball Oversight Committee. The Women’s Basketball Committee noted moving to a two-site format would elevate and enhance the student-athlete experience, enhance broadcast coverage, create opportunity for growth of the sport and championship, build the brand of women’s basketball and expand programming targeting strategic plan initiatives that were announced in the NCAA Women’s Basketball Strategic Plan.3
    RPI remains the evaluation tool for this season. The committee will continue evaluating NET for future use:

    The committee also conducted its annual summer assessment of the Ratings Percentage Index system, noting that the RPI will remain the sole provider of supplemental data for the evaluation of teams for at-large selection and seeding of the 2020 championship bracket. The committee also will take the next steps toward the possible use of NET for the start of the 2020-21 season. Steps include the analysis of women’s basketball statistical data over multiple years to build a women’s basketball algorithm that includes game results, strength of schedule, game location, scoring margin and net efficiency (offensive efficiency minus defensive efficiency)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •