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  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompous Elitist View Post
    No worries, we all have our prejudices and I don’t expect everyone to agree with mine. My tangent is due to me finding some level of humor in the FBI sending out a wave of 300 agents and untold man hours on a college entrance prep scam (I imagine some less - or un- qualified applicants are admitted to selective schools for a variety of reasons every year, just as some jobseekers are awarded positions they not be the best candidate for), and contrasted with the lack of a single prosecution of an exquisitely calculated widespread fraud that harmed millions.
    I guess we don't know if the FBI told 300 agents "Drop what you're doing! Nobody goes home until we make an arrest! We have some rich people to catch *smirks*"; or "Hey, Bob...when you're done looking at that case about the haunted amusement park, can you check into this thing about some bribery payments and this test-taker man?...Thanks. And hey...have a good weekend."


  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompous Elitist View Post
    No worries, we all have our prejudices and I donít expect everyone to agree with mine. My tangent is due to me finding some level of humor in the FBI sending out a wave of 300 agents and untold man hours on a college entrance prep scam (I imagine some less - or un- qualified applicants are admitted to selective schools for a variety of reasons every year, just as some jobseekers are awarded positions they not be the best candidate for), and contrasted with the lack of a single prosecution of an exquisitely calculated widespread fraud that harmed millions.
    Distraction?

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by LakerFan View Post
    That's what i don't get. Who has the pull to decide to dedicate resources to find out if rich and famous people spend money to get their kids privileges they don't technically deserve?

    So your the director the FBI allocating time and you sit in a room and think, maybe we should work on national prescription medication abuse and the complicity of large drug companies, maybe we should crack down on human traffickers, maybe we should do something about identity theft especially on tax return fraud, Naww... what is really important to the average american and national security is that the right kids end up as alternates on the Yale crew team.
    They can do more than one thing.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMWinSTP View Post
    I think the story states they got it as a tip while working an unrelated case.
    And then I believe the guy who ran the "charity" that many of the "donations" were made to took a deal and spilled all the beans.

  5. #20
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    What I don't know is this - were these kids so dumb they had no chance of getting into college without cheating - or did the rich parents grease the skids so the kids could get into a particular school? that's what doesn't make sense to me.

    instead of dropping a half-million dollars to cheat your kids into USC, Full House mom could have used that money to hire tutors, or get the kids career counseling, etc to help them find a career. Instead, they decided it would be easier to cough up a half-mill to cheat the kids into USC. Where's the return on investment? is it worth a half-million just to be able to say "my kids are going to USC?" Holy bleep. Some people really do have too much money.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by short ornery norwegian View Post
    What I don't know is this - were these kids so dumb they had no chance of getting into college without cheating - or did the rich parents grease the skids so the kids could get into a particular school? that's what doesn't make sense to me.

    instead of dropping a half-million dollars to cheat your kids into USC, Full House mom could have used that money to hire tutors, or get the kids career counseling, etc to help them find a career. Instead, they decided it would be easier to cough up a half-mill to cheat the kids into USC. Where's the return on investment? is it worth a half-million just to be able to say "my kids are going to USC?" Holy bleep. Some people really do have too much money.
    Right. I get Harvard and Yale. You get a degree there (assuming these kids could hack it) and it means something. But USC? You couldn't instead go to UC Riverside or UC San Diego? Is it that much nicer? And maybe giving the kid the 500 grand and teaching them how to invest would have been a lot smarter of an idea. You can nearly live off the interest of 500 grand...
    "My life has become a single, ongoing revelation that I haven't been cynical enough." - Chrisjen Avasarala

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by short ornery norwegian View Post
    What I don't know is this - were these kids so dumb they had no chance of getting into college without cheating - or did the rich parents grease the skids so the kids could get into a particular school? that's what doesn't make sense to me.

    instead of dropping a half-million dollars to cheat your kids into USC, Full House mom could have used that money to hire tutors, or get the kids career counseling, etc to help them find a career. Instead, they decided it would be easier to cough up a half-mill to cheat the kids into USC. Where's the return on investment? is it worth a half-million just to be able to say "my kids are going to USC?" Holy bleep. Some people really do have too much money.
    It’s probably moreso just common practice. These people had unlucky timing. I’m surprised by the reaction to this more than anything like we just assume all these wealthy kids have the grades to get in. Just on average, that seems unlikely. But we live in a society where the money in your pocket determines your value and overall intelligence so I guess it shouldn’t be too surprising.
    Last edited by GopherNuts; 03-13-2019 at 12:25 PM.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by short ornery norwegian View Post
    What I don't know is this - were these kids so dumb they had no chance of getting into college without cheating - or did the rich parents grease the skids so the kids could get into a particular school? that's what doesn't make sense to me.

    instead of dropping a half-million dollars to cheat your kids into USC, Full House mom could have used that money to hire tutors, or get the kids career counseling, etc to help them find a career. Instead, they decided it would be easier to cough up a half-mill to cheat the kids into USC. Where's the return on investment? is it worth a half-million just to be able to say "my kids are going to USC?" Holy bleep. Some people really do have too much money.
    Charitable contributions can be a way to avoid taxes. There may have been more going on than a simple bribe. Some of the numbers being talked about are astounding. Something doesn’t smell right.

  9. #24

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    Iím surprised there is not more discussion in sports media about the IMG guy, who supposedly took exams for student athletes. Will there be attempts to identify who may have dishonestly met NCAA qualification and obtained athletic scholarships?

  10. #25

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    So when does the NCAA announce penalties against the U for this transgression?

  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompous Elitist View Post
    No worries, we all have our prejudices and I donít expect everyone to agree with mine. My tangent is due to me finding some level of humor in the FBI sending out a wave of 300 agents and untold man hours on a college entrance prep scam (I imagine some less - or un- qualified applicants are admitted to selective schools for a variety of reasons every year, just as some jobseekers are awarded positions they not be the best candidate for), and contrasted with the lack of a single prosecution of an exquisitely calculated widespread fraud that harmed millions.
    Do you think it is possible to investigate two things at the same time

  12. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompous Elitist View Post
    Charitable contributions can be a way to avoid taxes. There may have been more going on than a simple bribe. Some of the numbers being talked about are astounding. Something doesn’t smell right.
    Probably the most serious charges the people involved in this will face is tax evasion - this was a fake charity, and the people who paid into it and then deducted it on their taxes are (allegedly) guilty of tax fraud.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Some guy View Post
    Do you think it is possible to investigate two things at the same time
    No, I don’t.

    Hey, it’s great they clapped these guys and if any of them go on to serve time it could be a deterrent for others but let’s be real - there are probably more important issues that could be looked into. I mentioned one, and I recall things in the news like hotline tips regarding firearms and mental illness that weren’t followed up on (due to lack of manpower/hours I’d imagine) prior to the Florida high school mass shooting...could go on.

    Anyone that has ever held a busy job will tell you that no, it isn’t possible to be in two places at once.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompous Elitist View Post
    No, I donít.

    Hey, itís great they clapped these guys and if any of them go on to serve time it could be a deterrent for others but letís be real - there are probably more important issues that could be looked into. I mentioned one, and I recall things in the news like hotline tips regarding firearms and mental illness that werenít followed up on (due to lack of manpower/hours Iíd imagine) prior to the Florida high school mass shooting...could go on.

    Anyone that has ever held a busy job will tell you that no, it isnít possible to be in two places at once.
    Beat cops do it multiple times a day.
    FBI agents do it the same way.
    The phone rings. They answer. They key in some information into a database. Somebody else gets flagged to make a few calls. Yep. They can do more than one at a time.
    You can call me Shirley. The "S" has to stand for something!

  15. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompous Elitist View Post
    No, I don’t.

    Hey, it’s great they clapped these guys and if any of them go on to serve time it could be a deterrent for others but let’s be real - there are probably more important issues that could be looked into. I mentioned one, and I recall things in the news like hotline tips regarding firearms and mental illness that weren’t followed up on (due to lack of manpower/hours I’d imagine) prior to the Florida high school mass shooting...could go on.

    Anyone that has ever held a busy job will tell you that no, it isn’t possible to be in two places at once.
    Well then you aren’t very smart considering the fbi has hundreds of active investigations.

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