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  1. #1

    Default Dabo Swinney says Clemson may have mistakenly provided PEDs

    per Crawford:

    Clemson may have mistakenly provided performance-enhancing drugs to players, Tigers coach Dabo Swinney acknowledged to The Post and Courier on Saturday.

    Defensive tackle Dexter Lawrence, offensive lineman Zach Giella and tight end Braden Galloway failed an NCAA drug test ahead of the College Football Playoff Semifinal against Notre Dame in December and did not play in the postseason after testing positive for ostarine, a banned substance.

    “Oh yeah, I mean, there’s a chance that it could come from anything,” Swinney said when asked if it’s possible the players ingested ostarine in a Clemson-issued supplement. “They’re going to test everything and look at everything. And that’s the problem. As you really look at this stuff, it could be a contaminant that came from anything, that was something that was cleared and not a problem, and all of a sudden, it becomes there was something.”

    https://247sports.com/Article/Dabo-S...EDs-128909527/

    Go Gophers!!


  2. #2
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    Taken out of context, that line doesn’t make Swinney look great. Wonder if they tested all of Clemson’s players?

  3. #3

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    I am pretty sure we had a similar issue when Mason was the coach. Players have to be really careful about supplements.

    Sent from my LG-H820 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    Considering the poor quality and unlisted ingredients of many supplements and the shoddy quality control of some manufacturing facilities I would imagine head coaches or athletic departments explicitly ban their athletes from supplementing unless a) it is known for efficacy b) issued from the school c) sourced from a quality supplier.

  5. #5

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    They don't need supplements. Real food is plenty good.

    Rather, would suspect for these big time programs, smaller supplement brands practically beg these teams to take pallets of free crap, just so the brand can say "we're affiliated with Clemson football", etc.

    Team assumes it's just a protein shake, gives them out to players .... whoops!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompous Elitist View Post
    Considering the poor quality and unlisted ingredients of many supplements and the shoddy quality control of some manufacturing facilities I would imagine head coaches or athletic departments explicitly ban their athletes from supplementing unless a) it is known for efficacy b) issued from the school c) sourced from a quality supplier.
    100% correct ... in what they SHOULD do. Will they? It's business, so probably not.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompous Elitist View Post
    Considering the poor quality and unlisted ingredients of many supplements and the shoddy quality control of some manufacturing facilities I would imagine head coaches or athletic departments explicitly ban their athletes from supplementing unless a) it is known for efficacy b) issued from the school c) sourced from a quality supplier.
    I am sure the training staff hated reading Dabo's comments. There are people on staff who's job it is to make sure the supplements they give the players are legal and approved by the NCAA. They would have to be complete fools to issue unapproved supplements to the players directly from the team.

    Looking at the comments with the story it sounds like the substance they tested positive for is not found very commonly at all so Dabo saying they might have given it to them on accident is just him trying to stick up for his players.

    What they can't of course control is what players do on their own. If the substance had come from the team more than just 3 players would have failed the drug test.

  8. #8

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    Yeah but, there is no FDA regulation of supplements.

    Staff guy looks at the ingredient list, sees no banned substances, gives it out to players. Except ... oh whoops, the company threw in some extra crap that wasn't on the label. Welp, that's not illegal .... they're unregulated.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MNVCGUY View Post
    I am sure the training staff hated reading Dabo's comments. There are people on staff who's job it is to make sure the supplements they give the players are legal and approved by the NCAA. They would have to be complete fools to issue unapproved supplements to the players directly from the team.

    Looking at the comments with the story it sounds like the substance they tested positive for is not found very commonly at all so Dabo saying they might have given it to them on accident is just him trying to stick up for his players.

    What they can't of course control is what players do on their own. If the substance had come from the team more than just 3 players would have failed the drug test.
    You hit the nail on the head. There’s always the theoretic chance of some mild cross-contamination with a lot of caveats but I’d hope the testing limit accounts for that possibility.

    Beyond that, if players choose to fall for marketing hype and hearsay the stupid games/stupid prizes clause applies. Just don’t do it.

  10. #10
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    If you want to get paranoid about this all, watch Icarus on Netflix. Wonderful film about his type of thing

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by upnorthkid View Post
    If you want to get paranoid about this all, watch Icarus on Netflix. Wonderful film about his type of thing
    Movie watch: Mods move this post to Son's Huddle report today.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by #2Gopher View Post
    Movie watch: Mods move this post to Son's Huddle report today.
    Every high school , junior college and D1 college that I have been associated with took supplements of some sort. The Clemenson coach is correct, unless you do an investigative study if each and every item,you really have to rely on the manufacturer to be correct as to the ingredients. It is sad in a way. Sometimes kids(and coaches) want to shortcut the process by using supplements rather “using” hard work. Sign of the times.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pompous Elitist View Post
    Considering the poor quality and unlisted ingredients of many supplements and the shoddy quality control of some manufacturing facilities I would imagine head coaches or athletic departments explicitly ban their athletes from supplementing unless a) it is known for efficacy b) issued from the school c) sourced from a quality supplier.
    I know many MLB teams give players a list of approved supplements and ban anything not on the list. The approved supplements are all tested and I believe they look into their QC programs as well.

    I'm surprised that isn't a standard across professional and collegiate sports. Supplements are known for being unreliable. If they just saw the label said it was free of banned substances and assumed it must be true, it's hard to feel bad for them.

  14. #14

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    Reminds me of this: https://youtu.be/HnW4uVvIVY4

    Basically anything can be in the "Proprietary Blend" and the company doesn't have to tell anyone what's in it. Not saying that happened in this case, but totally possible that something was in a supplement in the "Proprietary Blend" and no one did any further testing for banned substances before giving it to players.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete smith View Post
    Every high school , junior college and D1 college that I have been associated with took supplements of some sort. The Clemenson coach is correct, unless you do an investigative study if each and every item,you really have to rely on the manufacturer to be correct as to the ingredients. It is sad in a way. Sometimes kids(and coaches) want to shortcut the process by using supplements rather “using” hard work. Sign of the times.
    The NCAA tests and provides lists of approved and banned substances to schools. For an NCAA school there is zero guesswork involved in terms of what supplements the players can and can not take. If the staff is not sure on a new supplement they have a means of having it checked to make sure it is legal.

    Obviously that will not be the same at the high school level or small colleges but for Clemson there shouldn't have been any chance the team gave the substance to the players unless their training staff is just totally incompetent or they are just that desperate to cheat.

    And as I said in a different post, if the team issued the tainted supplements way more then 3 players would have failed the drug test.
    Last edited by MNVCGUY; 02-10-2019 at 05:08 PM.

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