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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by caliGopher View Post
    It comes down to what the strategy is. While the U, per usual, appears not to have one (make money is not a strategy) they have defaulted to the short term - make as much as you can from those who are willing to pay. The long term strategy is to fill the stadium. More butts in seats = more noise, more concession sales (even if it's minimally more), more souvenir revenue. Once you fill the stadium, you can increase pricing slowly over time. PSLs may never go away completely, but improving the game day environment would go a long way to helping the program improve. I've been to more than one Gopher game where a large vocal fan base at the end of the game could have influenced the outcome of the game.
    Ha really? At the end of the day the U has to make money to survive, how can that not be a strategy? It's the #1 thing that matters.


  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by GopherWeatherGuy View Post
    Ha really? At the end of the day the U has to make money to survive, how can that not be a strategy? It's the #1 thing that matters.
    I didnít say they didnít need to make money. I did say ďmake moneyĒ is not a strategy.

    Iím not surprised you donít understand the difference between a goal (maximize revenue, or make money) and a strategy (what you need to do to build a sustainable revenue stream - get butts in seats, improve the game day experience, look beyond tickets as revenue opportunities, etc). Most people donít understand that difference.






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  3. #18

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    It's similar with rock concerts as well. The paradigm shifted with the advent of the digital age. Bands used to make most of their money off album (remember them?) sales and would use tours to promote the latest album. Now with all the changes in music merchandising due largely to downloading, bands make most of their money off touring, which has forced ticket prices into the stratosphere. Worst seat in the house for a big-time band will probably cost you about $100.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by caliGopher View Post
    I didn’t say they didn’t need to make money. I did say “make money” is not a strategy.

    I’m not surprised you don’t understand the difference between a goal (maximize revenue, or make money) and a strategy (what you need to do to build a sustainable revenue stream - get butts in seats, improve the game day experience, look beyond tickets as revenue opportunities, etc). Most people don’t understand that difference.






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    Including you. They do currently have a sustainable revenue stream.

  5. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by caliGopher View Post
    It comes down to what the strategy is. While the U, per usual, appears not to have one (make money is not a strategy) they have defaulted to the short term - make as much as you can from those who are willing to pay. The long term strategy is to fill the stadium. More butts in seats = more noise, more concession sales (even if it's minimally more), more souvenir revenue. Once you fill the stadium, you can increase pricing slowly over time. PSLs may never go away completely, but improving the game day environment would go a long way to helping the program improve. I've been to more than one Gopher game where a large vocal fan base at the end of the game could have influenced the outcome of the game.
    It sounds like you are also confused about goals vs strategy. The goal is your target and the strategy is your roadmap to your goal. The AD has several goals and each program/team has several goals and each goal would have strategies. And of course, those goals change as you accomplish or reevaluate your targets.

    PJ could have goals like win the B1G West, improve academics, etc. and that could be accomplished by strategies like recruit more defensive linemen, improve class attendance, tutors, etc...

    Attendance is a blend of game day experience and pricing vs demand. The U has enough brilliant business minds/professors that could easily develop a series of pricing models and fan experience plans (game day, customer service, seat licenses, fees, perks, etc...). Ask the school of business to set up projects for the students to develop these plans in there classes.

    The U claims to have one of the best business schools in the country... use them. The students and professors would really love to work on real plans that help their university. Imagine the resume builder to say you actually developed plans for the U to optimize attendance and revenue, or improved game day experience, etc... And the U can recruit students by saying you can work on actual business plans instead of HBR case studies...


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  6. #21
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    Look - none of us, as far as I know, has real inside information on the goals and strategy of the U of MN athletic department. All we can go on is what we see from the outside.

    And what we see is a fairly sharp decline in the number of people attending games - which certainly appears to be connected to the increase in mandatory seat donations. (and/or the success or lack thereof by the teams).

    For all we know, the U of MN may be just fine with this. Because of the TV revenue, they may be able to meet their budget at the current level of ticket sales. So, in this scenario, they do not perceive a need to offer financial incentives to get people back into the stadium.

    On the other hand, if the U is concerned about football attendance, and they want to change the situation, then it's fair to ask, what is their goal, and what strategy do they have to meet that goal.

    From the outside looking in, it's hard to perceive that there is a strategy. And if they have a strategy, the U is doing a bleep-poor job of communicating that strategy to the ticket-buying public.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by GopherWeatherGuy View Post
    Including you. They do currently have a sustainable revenue stream.
    For ticket revenue, which is what this thread has been about?

    Or, per usual, are you pivoting to expand or reframe the topic when someone points out your off in one of your comments?

    The athletic department has a good revenue stream from Broadcast rights, if thatís what you meant, but each element of the department is a cost center or should be.



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  8. #23

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    In other college towns, like IA, WI, NE, there is nothing else to do.
    If they don't go to the football game, they literally do nothing.
    They probably don't vacation much other than the bowl games.

    It's hard to get someone to feed your pigs and milk your cows for a week.

    Also, in these areas, to climb the social status ladder, in conversations you need to say "I was at the _____ game" on Saturday. (This applies for Packer fans too).

    Sometimes they will say "I traveled to a road game to watch the ____ play. Their fans simply aren't true fans like at our home ____ games. They had bigger video boards, music between plays / during timeouts, etc."
    "Do Not Be Afraid to Be A Legend"

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