Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 133
  1. #1

    Default H R McMaster Picked as National Secuirty Advisor

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/20/politi...urity-adviser/

    Author of "Dereliction of Duty" a book about the manipulation leading down the Vietnam path.


    President Donald Trump announced Monday that Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster will serve as his next national security adviser, filling the void left last week by the sudden dismissal of Michael Flynn


  2. #2

    Default

    A huge plus with Trump has been his cabinet picks and SCOTUS pick. Another good one.

  3. #3

    Default

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontl...c/lessons.html

    An interview with H R McMaster from PBS Frontline:

    In 1997, an Army major published a book about Vietnam that caught the attention of virtually every American military leader. The writer was H.R. McMaster and the book is titled Dereliction of Duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, The Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies that Led to Vietnam.

    McMaster's work, in particular his detailed accounting of military culpability for the failure in Vietnam, touched a resonant chord among a generation of service brass, many of whom had served there. For them, the enduring lesson was not just about the conduct and means of war, but also the responsibility of leadership. Through his research, McMaster lays bare the complicity and acquiescence of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in accepting President Johnson's fateful approach to the war. "The 'five silent men' on the Joint Chiefs, McMaster writes, made possible the way the United States went to war in Vietnam.


    What are we to take from Vietnam about the concept of graduated pressure and the use of force, particularly air power, as a form of diplomatic communication? Why not bombs for peace?

    There is a grave danger associated with calling the bombing of another country anything but war. During the period in which Vietnam became an American war, Lyndon Johnson and Robert McNamara created the illusion that attacks on North Vietnam were alternatives to war rather than war itself. Bombing, particularly from the perspective of the receiving end, is not "communication." Bombs result in death and destruction. After engaging in acts of war against another nation, there exists a degree of uncertainty in terms of the enemy's reactions. War inspires an unpredictable psychology and evokes strong emotions that defy systems analysis quantification.

    Once the United States crossed the threshold of war against North Vietnam, the future course of events depended not only on decisions made in Washington, but also on enemy responses and initiatives. Sadly, Pentagon war games predicted the enemy reaction, a massive offensive on the ground, but McNamara ignored that advice. Indeed, many people within the administration made compelling arguments against the assumption that bombing would affect Hanoi's will sufficiently to convince North Vietnam to desist from its support of the insurgency in the South. Until the massive deployment of ground troops in 1965 forced him to confront the consequences of his earlier decisions, McNamara continued to view the war as another business management problem. The notion that air power alone could solve the complex military and political problem of Vietnam was based in ignorance and advocacy by air power zealots. It was obvious to many at the time that bombing fixed installations and economic targets was not appropriate for Vietnamese communist mobile forces. Curiously, the definition of the enemy's strength derived from the strategy rather from a critical examination of the full political, cultural, and military reality in South Vietnam. Perhaps a lesson is that one should take pause before using military force for communication, punishment, or catharsis. The application of military force without a clear idea of how that force is contributing to the attainment of policy goals is not only unwise, but dangerous.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    35,053
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Section2 View Post
    A huge plus with Trump has been his cabinet picks and SCOTUS pick. Another good one.
    Sometimes the 8th pick after the first 7 laugh in your face is the right one. Ask Joel Maturi.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Section2 View Post
    A huge plus with Trump has been his cabinet picks and SCOTUS pick. Another good one.
    McMaster looks like a good pick, so far, even if McMaster cannot say no to his appointment.

    As for most of Trump's cabinet picks, I know you are not joking, which is very, very SAD!

  6. #6

    Default

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/mcmaster...urity-adviser/

    A complication for McMaster:


    An esoteric, but legally significant, point is being raised by the Senate Armed Services Committee regarding Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster’s appointment as national security adviser.

    Even though the president can install anyone he wants in the post without getting consent from the Senate, the law requires a confirmation vote for any three- or four-star general. All generals of this rank are appointed to their posts by the president and Senate-confirmed, so a change in post -- in this instance from Director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center to national security adviser -- requires that the Senate reconfirm McMaster’s rank as a three-star general.

    An aide to the Armed Services Committee says that in order for McMaster to keep his current rank, he “would have to be reappointed by the president and reconfirmed by the Senate in that grade for his new position.”

    Alternatively, McMaster could retire or step down a grade, to two-star.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    31,394
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Don't think this can possibly be a concern. The Rs control the Senate as proven by the cabinet confirmations, so there are not enough idiots like Franken, Shumer, and the like to interfere with this excellent appointment. The tit for tat measured response of dropping a few bombs is a proven failure. Just wipe them out and come home. Come home right away. Do not rebuild them. But never go wipe them out when there is another alternative. War follows failed diplomacy. Not sure there is a diplomacy for the Jihadies.
    Kingdom Warriors

  8. #8

    Default

    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/0...verrule-236065

    Overruled (according to Politico):

    President Donald Trump has overruled a decision by his national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, to sideline a key intelligence operative who fell out of favor with some at the Central Intelligence Agency, two sources told POLITICO.

    On Friday, McMaster told the National Security Council’s senior director for intelligence programs, Ezra Cohen-Watnick, that he would be moved to another position in the organization.

    The conversation followed weeks of pressure from career officials at the CIA who had expressed reservations about the 30-year-old intelligence operative and pushed for his ouster.

    But Cohen-Watnick appealed McMaster’s decision to two influential allies with whom he had forged a relationship while working on Trump’s transition team — White House advisers Steve Bannon and Jared Kushner. They brought the matter to Trump on Sunday, and the president agreed that Cohen-Watnick should remain as the NSC’s intelligence director, according to two people with knowledge of the episode.

    The incident raises questions about just how much autonomy Trump is giving to McMaster, who was tapped last month as national security adviser amid questions about whether he’d have full staffing authority over the NSC.

    It also highlights ongoing tensions between the CIA and Trump aides who are skeptical of the agency, feeding into concerns expressed by the president and his allies about the intelligence community.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ignatius L Hoops View Post
    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/0...verrule-236065

    Overruled (according to Politico):

    President Donald Trump has overruled a decision by his national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, to sideline a key intelligence operative who fell out of favor with some at the Central Intelligence Agency, two sources told POLITICO.

    On Friday, McMaster told the National Security Council’s senior director for intelligence programs, Ezra Cohen-Watnick, that he would be moved to another position in the organization.

    The conversation followed weeks of pressure from career officials at the CIA who had expressed reservations about the 30-year-old intelligence operative and pushed for his ouster.

    But Cohen-Watnick appealed McMaster’s decision to two influential allies with whom he had forged a relationship while working on Trump’s transition team — White House advisers Steve Bannon and Jared Kushner. They brought the matter to Trump on Sunday, and the president agreed that Cohen-Watnick should remain as the NSC’s intelligence director, according to two people with knowledge of the episode.

    The incident raises questions about just how much autonomy Trump is giving to McMaster, who was tapped last month as national security adviser amid questions about whether he’d have full staffing authority over the NSC.

    It also highlights ongoing tensions between the CIA and Trump aides who are skeptical of the agency, feeding into concerns expressed by the president and his allies about the intelligence community.
    WOW. So much for trying to make peace with the intelligence community. And so much for departmental independence. One ring to rule them all....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    31,394
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    After all the intel leaks it is going to get ugly for a lot of them. It should and they should serve time. The intel community became uncommonly dirty and ugly over the last 8 years. Time to clean house and reorganize top to bottom. It requires people far more competent than you have ever known. You don't have any clue. But then, why should you?
    Kingdom Warriors

  11. #11

    Default

    Yes. Clean house. That would fix the leak.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    35,053
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by diehard View Post
    After all the intel leaks it is going to get ugly for a lot of them. It should and they should serve time. The intel community became uncommonly dirty and ugly over the last 8 years. Time to clean house and reorganize top to bottom. It requires people far more competent than you have ever known. You don't have any clue. But then, why should you?
    When do you start? Will this effect your ability to testify in the voter fraud trials?

  13. #13

    Default

    http://thehill.com/policy/national-s...t-h-r-mcmaster

    More Palace intrigue:

    National security adviser H.R. McMaster has become the latest target of the leaks and infighting that have dogged the Trump administration’s early days.

    Now, McMaster, a favorite of Washington’s GOP and foreign policy establishment, finds himself in the crosshairs of anonymous White House officials as the administration mulls ramping up the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan.
    Those close to the White House describe the latest scuffle as another power struggle between rival spheres of influence. Foreign policy experts see the leaks as a reflection of a broader internal dispute over the appropriate level of U.S. involvement in the Middle East.

    Once again, Bannon is rumored to be at the center of it.

    A day earlier, Bloomberg View columnist Eli Lake reported that Trump was boiling over with rage at McMaster and had berated him in front of White House staff.

    According to that report, Trump has “privately expressed regret” for choosing McMaster to replace Michael Flynn, a fierce Trump loyalist who was fired after only 24 days on the job amid controversy over his contacts with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

    Bloomberg’s story was replete with the kinds of juicy details that have been the hallmark of tales of White House infighting.

    Trump reportedly grew frustrated with McMaster for lecturing him on policy and not giving him a chance to ask questions at briefings.

    The story said that Trump at one point “screamed” at McMaster on a phone call for assuring South Korean officials that the U.S. would foot the bill for a missile defense system, contradicting the president.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ignatius L Hoops View Post
    http://thehill.com/policy/national-s...t-h-r-mcmaster

    More Palace intrigue:

    National security adviser H.R. McMaster has become the latest target of the leaks and infighting that have dogged the Trump administration’s early days.

    Now, McMaster, a favorite of Washington’s GOP and foreign policy establishment, finds himself in the crosshairs of anonymous White House officials as the administration mulls ramping up the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan.
    Those close to the White House describe the latest scuffle as another power struggle between rival spheres of influence. Foreign policy experts see the leaks as a reflection of a broader internal dispute over the appropriate level of U.S. involvement in the Middle East.

    Once again, Bannon is rumored to be at the center of it.

    A day earlier, Bloomberg View columnist Eli Lake reported that Trump was boiling over with rage at McMaster and had berated him in front of White House staff.

    According to that report, Trump has “privately expressed regret” for choosing McMaster to replace Michael Flynn, a fierce Trump loyalist who was fired after only 24 days on the job amid controversy over his contacts with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

    Bloomberg’s story was replete with the kinds of juicy details that have been the hallmark of tales of White House infighting.

    Trump reportedly grew frustrated with McMaster for lecturing him on policy and not giving him a chance to ask questions at briefings.

    The story said that Trump at one point “screamed” at McMaster on a phone call for assuring South Korean officials that the U.S. would foot the bill for a missile defense system, contradicting the president.
    wow. just wow.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    31,394
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    No one is perfect, but I am surprised McMaster might have dome some of this. Probably didn't though, likely fiction from thehill.
    Kingdom Warriors

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •