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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by bga1 View Post
    Because in America the taboo against questioning the current orthodoxy on race is too strong and the price is too high. [/I]
    This is so true, and also why I find the claims of an invisible systemic racism in the US so laughable. The systemic problem is nearly the opposite.


  2. #32

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    If S2 posted it, then ultimately the article will boil down to some slant or latent agenda for disrupting funding for public services.

    But, at least for the snippet that bga posted, except for the last sentence, it seems mostly devoid of that. As far as the author's opinion on why some students are disruptive and "resist education", they may or may not be correct. For some students it possibly is the case, for others it is not.

    In general however, I do agree with the idea that we shouldn't force most kids to be in school until 18. There is some age, I don't know what it is, but before that we should have a single track for education, but after that there should be a general track called something like "work prep", and then a smaller track, into which access must be earned through aptitude, called something like "college prep".

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by bga1 View Post
    The article is fantastic and I know people personally that would back it up 100%. Here is a couple clips of it that summarize the main point, but you should read it for yourself as this teacher describes what she personally saw:
    "My NYC teaching career began a few days before September 11, 2001 at Washington Irving High School. It was a short honeymoon period; the classes watched skeptically as I introduced them to a method of teaching French using virtually no English. Although the students weren’t particularly engaged, they remained respectful. During first period on that awful day there was a horrendous split-second noise. A plane flew right overhead a mere moment before it blasted into the north tower of the World Trade Center. At break time word was spreading among the staff. Both towers were hit and one had already come down. When I went to my next class I told the students what had happened. There was an eruption of rejoicing at the news. Many students clapped and whooped their approval, some getting out of their seats to do a sort of victory dance. It was an eye-opener, and indicative of what was to come."

    Yeah...sure...

  4. #34
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    Kids have little attention span or the want to do actual work more than ever before. This has made the gap from the bottom to the top much like our economic situation. The top will always be there. The smartest kids will always be smart because they usually care more and are often more capable of succeeding. They are usually more able to handle the relationship between technology, life and school work better than the others. The bottom will always be there. The kids who really struggle will always struggle for many, many different reasons. The middle kids, which used to make up the majority, are simply falling behind. They are the ones to really worry about because they are the ones joining the bottom more than the top.

    The leaders in education (often people who have never taught) have tried to "fix" this by dumbing down curriculum. Fixing the game so to speak. Scores go up and learning goes down.

    There are many reasons for this trend becoming the norm. I'll let others begin that debate.
    Aloha Mr. Hand

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered User View Post
    "My NYC teaching career began a few days before September 11, 2001 at Washington Irving High School. It was a short honeymoon period; the classes watched skeptically as I introduced them to a method of teaching French using virtually no English. Although the students weren’t particularly engaged, they remained respectful. During first period on that awful day there was a horrendous split-second noise. A plane flew right overhead a mere moment before it blasted into the north tower of the World Trade Center. At break time word was spreading among the staff. Both towers were hit and one had already come down. When I went to my next class I told the students what had happened. There was an eruption of rejoicing at the news. Many students clapped and whooped their approval, some getting out of their seats to do a sort of victory dance. It was an eye-opener, and indicative of what was to come."

    Yeah...sure...
    Why is that so hard to believe?

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by tikited View Post
    Kids have little attention span or the want to do actual work more than ever before. This has made the gap from the bottom to the top much like our economic situation. The top will always be there. The smartest kids will always be smart because they usually care more and are often more capable of succeeding. They are usually more able to handle the relationship between technology, life and school work better than the others. The bottom will always be there. The kids who really struggle will always struggle for many, many different reasons. The middle kids, which used to make up the majority, are simply falling behind. They are the ones to really worry about because they are the ones joining the bottom more than the top.

    The leaders in education (often people who have never taught) have tried to "fix" this by dumbing down curriculum. Fixing the game so to speak. Scores go up and learning goes down.

    There are many reasons for this trend becoming the norm. I'll let others begin that debate.
    A keen observation from someone who is competent and has working knowledge. Kudos!
    Kingdom Warriors

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered User View Post
    "My NYC teaching career began a few days before September 11, 2001 at Washington Irving High School. It was a short honeymoon period; the classes watched skeptically as I introduced them to a method of teaching French using virtually no English. Although the students weren’t particularly engaged, they remained respectful. During first period on that awful day there was a horrendous split-second noise. A plane flew right overhead a mere moment before it blasted into the north tower of the World Trade Center. At break time word was spreading among the staff. Both towers were hit and one had already come down. When I went to my next class I told the students what had happened. There was an eruption of rejoicing at the news. Many students clapped and whooped their approval, some getting out of their seats to do a sort of victory dance. It was an eye-opener, and indicative of what was to come."

    Yeah...sure...
    Sounds as likely as the Muslims celebrating on roof tops that only Donald Trump saw.

    Another quality source from the Fellas.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Section2 View Post
    https://quillette.com/2019/02/10/pub...-dirty-secret/

    Phenomenal must read article.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Great article. Thanks for posting. Racist folks on gh gonna bash you. And the article.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by howeda7 View Post
    Sounds as likely as the Muslims celebrating on roof tops that only Donald Trump saw.

    Another quality source from the Fellas.
    Wait, you're opposed to Quillette as a source? LOL, that's rich. The "source" in this is a NY school teacher, who taught at 3 different schools sharing her experience. You just ear muff it there buddy, stay in your liberal bubble.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by bga1 View Post
    The article is fantastic and I know people personally that would back it up 100%. Here is a couple clips of it that summarize the main point, but you should read it for yourself as this teacher describes what she personally saw:

    Bad teaching is a common explanation given for the disastrously inadequate public education received by America’s most vulnerable populations. This is a myth. Aside from a few lemons who were notable for their rarity, the majority of teachers I worked with for nine years in New York City’s public school system were dedicated, talented professionals. Before joining the system I was mystified by the schools’ abysmal results. I too assumed there must be something wrong with the teaching. This could not have been farther from the truth.

    Teaching French and Italian in NYC high schools I finally figured out why this was, although it took some time, because the real reason was so antithetical to the prevailing mindset. I worked at three very different high schools over the years, spanning a fairly representative sample. That was a while ago now, but the system has not improved since, as the fundamental problem has not been acknowledged, let alone addressed. It would not be hard, or expensive, to fix.
    ........................


    It is not poor teaching or a lack of money that is failing our most vulnerable populations. The real problem is an ethos of rejection that has never been openly admitted by those in authority.

    Why should millions of perfectly normal adolescents, not all of them ghettoized, resist being educated? The reason is that they know deep down that due to the color of their skin, less is expected of them. This they deeply resent. How could they not resent being seen as less capable? It makes perfect psychological sense. Being very young, however, they cannot articulate their resentment, or understand the reasons for it, especially since the adults in charge hide the truth. So they take out their rage on the only ones they can: themselves and their teachers.

    They also take revenge on a fraudulent system that pretends to educate them. The authorities cover up their own incompetence, and when that fails, blame the parents and teachers, or lack of funding, or “poverty,” “racism,” and so on. The media follow suit. Starting with our lawmakers, the whole country swallows the lie.

    Why do precious few adults admit the truth out loud? Because in America the taboo against questioning the current orthodoxy on race is too strong and the price is too high. What is failing our most vulnerable populations is the lack of political will to acknowledge and solve the real problems. The first step is to change the ”anti-discrimination” laws that breed anti-social behavior. Disruptive students must be removed from the classroom, not to punish them but to protect the majority of students who want to learn.
    You are an extremely dumb motherfu***r.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by howeda7 View Post
    Sounds as likely as the Muslims celebrating on roof tops that only Donald Trump saw.

    Another quality source from the Fellas.



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  12. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by BarnBurner View Post
    Great article. Thanks for posting. Racist folks on gh gonna bash you. And the article.
    What would disagreeing make someone a racist?


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  13. #43
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    Look who spoke first!!!!!

    Just using Sportego standards. Your standards.
    Last edited by BarnBurner; 02-11-2019 at 12:27 PM.

  14. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by tikited View Post
    Kids have little attention span or the want to do actual work more than ever before. This has made the gap from the bottom to the top much like our economic situation. The top will always be there. The smartest kids will always be smart because they usually care more and are often more capable of succeeding. They are usually more able to handle the relationship between technology, life and school work better than the others. The bottom will always be there. The kids who really struggle will always struggle for many, many different reasons. The middle kids, which used to make up the majority, are simply falling behind. They are the ones to really worry about because they are the ones joining the bottom more than the top.

    The leaders in education (often people who have never taught) have tried to "fix" this by dumbing down curriculum. Fixing the game so to speak. Scores go up and learning goes down.
    Well ...... to put on my pessimism hat ........ as long as everyone relative to each other stays the same ..... you're basically talking about the kids who are still expected to go to college, because that's the next step before working that is expected by middle to upper middle class parents, and end up qualifying for schools like St Cloud St, Mankato St, etc.

    Not kids who end up going to the U of MN, U of Wisc, and higher level schools. Those schools will always be fine, because they can peel off that top layer of kids who are always going to be there.


    But the St Cloud State's of the world still need new students too, in order to survive ....

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gophers_4life View Post
    Well ...... to put on my pessimism hat ........ as long as everyone relative to each other stays the same ..... you're basically talking about the kids who are still expected to go to college, because that's the next step before working that is expected by middle to upper middle class parents, and end up qualifying for schools like St Cloud St, Mankato St, etc.

    Not kids who end up going to the U of MN, U of Wisc, and higher level schools. Those schools will always be fine, because they can peel off that top layer of kids who are always going to be there.


    But the St Cloud State's of the world still need new students too, in order to survive ....
    tOTB has shown it to have very low standards. Hope that didn't sound too dorky.
    Kingdom Warriors

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